Ceiling Repair

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  #1  
Old 11-29-15, 02:26 PM
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Ceiling Repair

Bathroom on upper level of the home has ceiling damage from an issue with the foundation. (Foundation has been fixed.) There is a large area, approximately 24 x 30 inches, where the ceiling plaster has cracked away. See attached images.

With an area of repair this large, I am unsure what material to use. I have read in many places that Structo-Lite is the best route to go as a base, with a different finish coat such as joint compound.

Would appreciate any advice, tips, etc you can give.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-29-15, 04:18 PM
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Explain what you are showing us in th pictures.
This does not look like he damage 8 would expect to see from a foundation problem. How deep is the effected a Area? What is th base coat? Is it firm and hRd? Is there any sagging? How old is the house? At first glance it looks like you have plaster over an unknown substrate And the finish has come loose. Is this correct? Has the fan always been present in the bathroom? Does the fan work?how far from th fan to its exterior outlet? What is Above the Celine? Attic? Another story? What kind of roof do you have? Is the roof in good condition?

I have a couple ideas but tell us more. This might be a very simple fix.
 
  #3  
Old 11-29-15, 05:35 PM
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The top photo shows the area I need to repair and the bottom photo is a close up, showing the "depth" of the affected area. It is approximately 1/16" deep. The area overall is quite firm/hard, except for the a fist-size section in the very middle of the white area that is a little soft.

The more I think about this, could it be water damage? (That a previous owner simply covered with a drop ceiling.)

I believe you are right -- the finish has come loose off the base layer (which is plaster). I have lived in the house for 9 years and the fan has always been present. But...so has this problem. Just discovered it when I tore out the drop ceiling.

Fan works and is about 8-10 feet away from its external outlet. (Exhaust hose goes into the attic -- which is just above this bathroom -- and out the side of the house.)

Roof in very good condition. Standard asphalt shingle.

There is no sag in the ceiling. House built in 1927.

Thanks for the help!
 
  #4  
Old 11-29-15, 05:55 PM
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You probably have gypsum plaster over wood lath. Maybe it is over metal lath. That is not unheard of in houses but wood lath is more common. If the plaster is sound then I would do this. Scrape off anymore of th finish that comes off easily. You have to be the judge of when to stop. You might be able to scrape it all off but if it gets hard to tak off quit. Now to finish it I would suggest a setting type joint compound like EasySand by USG. There other brands. The number on th bag 5,20.45,90 is th set time in minutes. Mix enough to fill it out flush with the existing try to do ths without lapping the new material onto the existing. Keep the old work clean. When the material sets then you can let it dry and skim it with a thin coat of regular joint compound. Get it as smooth and flat as you can then when it is dry sand it, look for any defects in your work, correct them, sand them and then prime and look again for defects. You want this to look as good as the existing. Get T like that then spot prime any defects and paint.
You can use r gulag jo Not compound to do this it might take an extra day or two for it to dry. Keel you r coats thin. You don't want her high spots. You can always ad more. It is easie to add more than to sand off too much

Any more questions put them here. Let us know he it goes.
 
  #5  
Old 11-30-15, 05:20 AM
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You can use r gulag jo Not compound
I'm sure TC meant regular joint compound

What are all the dots on the paint?
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-15, 07:26 AM
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Not sure what the dots on the ceiling are. Possibly nicotine? (The former owner was a smoker.) Although nicotine may not make that pattern.

There is also a mold issue in this bathroom, but that's another issue altogether.

Thanks for this great help!
 
  #7  
Old 11-30-15, 12:31 PM
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I'd take some bleach and scrub a portion of the ceiling and see what that does. Generally it will completely remove mold but might only smear nicotine. While it's best to wash off what nicotine you can it usually isn't feasible to remove it all so an oil base primer should be used to seal it [so it won't bleed thru latex paint] If the existing paint is an oil base enamel - oil primer will also bridge that gap.
 
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Old 11-30-15, 03:53 PM
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My clumsy fingers on the virtual keyboard of the iPad do that to me once in a while.

marksr

You can use r gulag jo Not compound
I'm sure TC meant regular joint compound

What are all the dots on the paint?
 
  #9  
Old 11-30-15, 03:57 PM
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I think that nicotine will make a pattern like in the pictures. The smoker probably sat and smoked and read and worked and the smoke was in the air and attracted to the cool surface of the lid. Moisture condensing on the ceiling would cause ti to form little droplets of smoke, water and nicotine. I've seen it a lot in old houses where smokers lived.
 
  #10  
Old 11-30-15, 05:38 PM
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Got it! Thanks a bunch. Appreciate the great advice!
 
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