Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

How would you patch this hole with drywall?


c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-05-16, 06:37 PM   #1  
How would you patch this hole with drywall?

I have a large hole in this wall and 2 similar smaller ones (not shown here) to patch, where piping sticks out and/or runs along wall exposed. I put a large piece of replacement drywall behind the piping in the picture, for reference. Thanks!
Name:  drywall1.jpg
Views: 648
Size:  17.4 KB


Last edited by c1351996; 01-05-16 at 08:00 PM.
 
Sponsored Links
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,971
VA

01-05-16, 07:06 PM   #2  
Start by finding a new plumber. Why do they think that they can plow into someones house, cause such damage and then ask for a check as if they are a hero. Then walk away richer and you are left with a unsightly hole. I will never understand the process as I am a turn key guy from start to finish.

The final pipe appears to be outside of the wall, where does that lead and was it like that all along?

 
Handyone's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 5,451
CAL

01-05-16, 07:14 PM   #3  
Cut out the damaged area square, ignore the pipe. Cut a new piece to fit.
To fit the new piece around the pipe, you can cut the new piece in half at the center line of pipe. Run the seam vertically or horizontally. You only need to carve out the edges of the new piece enough to make a hole for the pipe.
For these types of repairs I use hot mud (setting type mud). You can apply 2 or 3 coats in hours rather than days.

Edit: I'll let Czizzi get on the contractors..... Some of these guys kill me in their approach to repairs.


Brian
Cal Contractor

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-06-16, 01:38 AM   #4  
Thanks but "Lighten up, Francis" on the contractor as he is I...so at least i didn't have to write a check. Now, with that being said, how and where would you attach the drywall?

 
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,548
NC

01-06-16, 02:57 AM   #5  
On the left square the side up i the middle of stud (leaves room to nail) top of hole use a straight edge. Cut a slot where pipe sticks out and slid dry wall down Use cut out piece to fill in slot. You will have to in bed cut out piece in the mud to hols it. Looks like concrete on bottom.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,794
TN

01-06-16, 02:58 AM   #6  
First you need to clean up the hole - straighter lines are easier to set a drywall patch too. Sometimes it's beneficial to add framing [as needed] to attach the drywall to.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,971
VA

01-06-16, 03:43 AM   #7  
Thanks but "Lighten up, Francis" on the contractor as he is I
Well, I have no shame is telling you it is a crappy job. Who wants to look at a run of plumbing outside of the wall. But it is, what it is.

I would remove additional drywall all the way along the length of the wall. I would then frame out by boxing in the whole length of pipe to make a chase. I would then drywall and finish the whole area. If by opening up the wall, find a way to better way to run the pipe, then I would fire up the torch and do it again. Short cuts are never the best way to proceed.

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-06-16, 07:18 AM   #8  
Thanks!
Posted By: pugsl
On the left square the side up i the middle of stud (leaves room to nail) top of hole use a straight edge. Cut a slot where pipe sticks out and slid dry wall down Use cut out piece to fill in slot. You will have to in bed cut out piece in the mud to hols it. Looks like concrete on bottom.
Yes, it's concrete on the bottom and the flooring is concrete as well

Posted By: marksr First you need to clean up the hole - straighter lines are easier to set a drywall patch too. Sometimes it's beneficial to add framing [as needed] to attach the drywall to.
Here's a full shot to give a better perspective:
Name:  drywall2.jpg
Views: 379
Size:  38.5 KB

Posted By: czizzi Well, I have no shame is telling you it is a crappy job. Who wants to look at a run of plumbing outside of the wall. But it is, what it is...
I have no shame telling you that every plumber that I had out quoted me to do the same but a lot less cost effective job...Besides, this is in my garage so I'm not all that concerned about aesthetics.


Last edited by c1351996; 01-06-16 at 07:55 AM.
 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,794
TN

01-06-16, 10:10 AM   #9  
I like Z's suggestion to frame it out so you can enclose the pipe inside the wall. I know freezing isn't a big concern but that would also protect the pipe from damage.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
Handyone's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 5,451
CAL

01-06-16, 10:36 AM   #10  
If you can sweat copper with no leaks, you have done a good job....


Brian
Cal Contractor

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-06-16, 01:57 PM   #11  
Thanks!
What would you use to clean up the hole, cut out the damaged area (plaster not drywall, btw), cut a new piece of drywall to fit and cut a slot where pipe sticks out??

Posted By: marksr I like Z's suggestion to frame it out so you can enclose the pipe inside the wall. I know freezing isn't a big concern but that would also protect the pipe from damage.
Yes, I may have been too busy defending my crappy job but thanks for reminding me of Z's suggestion to frame, I will definitely consider.

Posted By: Handyone If you can sweat copper with no leaks, you have done a good job....
Thanks!
But, I could not have done it without the help of a good friend.

 
tightcoat's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,676
CAL

01-06-16, 03:34 PM   #12  
Think about framing the whole hole and pipe. If you have plaster it must be over gypsum lath. I see a piece of it there. Your thicknesses will not match and you can just add some framing, cover the whole area up and make it look new. I think that would be easier than trying to snake new nailers amongst all the pipes. Make sure you know where all the pipes are so you don't put a screw into a water or electrical pipe.

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-07-16, 06:51 AM   #13  
Thanks!
I will definitely consider framing.
What would you all use to clean up the hole, cut out the damaged area (plaster not drywall, btw), cut a new piece of drywall to fit and cut a slot where pipe sticks out??

 
Handyone's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 5,451
CAL

01-07-16, 06:57 AM   #14  
Cut with a drywall saw, but the plaster is harder to cut.
I wouldn't cut a slot for the pipe, I would cut the drywall down the middle and wrap the drywall around the pipe from the sides. You only need to gouge out a semi-circle on each piece.

This is going to be a pain because you also need to shim out the drywall to match the thickness of the plaster.

Building a box around the pipe would be much easier, just a few seams to deal with.


Brian
Cal Contractor

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,794
TN

01-07-16, 08:49 AM   #15  
.... and if you frame up a box to cover the pipe and missing plaster - you don't have to clean up the hole as it will be hid.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-07-16, 09:37 AM   #16  
Thanks!
Brings up some questions of supplies/tools...
1) I've got a 6-Inch FatMax Jab Saw but with future proofing in mind, what about something like a rotozip or "cutout" tool?
2) What type of mud and tape would you use for this job?
3) Does anyone have an example pic or even better a how-to video of the type of framing job being recommended?

 
tightcoat's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,676
CAL

01-07-16, 04:38 PM   #17  
I think we are picturing the new frame being deep enough to cover all the pipes. You should not have to cut a slot. If th copper pipe is touching any of the galvanized pipe put some kind of electrical insulation between th two. Surely somewhere here or n YouTube is a clip on how to cut drywall. Maybe one of he listers who is skilled in that sort of thing can make a drawing of your framing. I can build it but I can't draw it. If I were doing this I might plaster it. Plaster always fits.i sure would be irritated by that horizontal copper pipe in the way.
You ask about mud and tape. I like FibaFuse. Google it. Otherwise use paper. It might be easier to find. I would use twenty minute mud. You might be happier with all purpose. It will need to dry between coats but if you get ridges it is easier to sand. The tighteryu run your mud of any type he better.

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-09-16, 01:22 PM   #18  
Thanks!
Posted By: tightcoat I think we are picturing the new frame being deep enough to cover all the pipes. You should not have to cut a slot. If the copper pipe is touching any of the galvanized pipe put some kind of electrical insulation between th two.
There's 3/4" between the copper pipe and the galvanized pipe.

Surely somewhere here or n YouTube is a clip on how to cut drywall. Maybe one of he listers who is skilled in that sort of thing can make a drawing of your framing. I can build it but I can't draw it.
When you say "framing"...Does this mean building a small frame out of wood and covering it with the drywall?

If I were doing this I might plaster it. Plaster always fits.i sure would be irritated by that horizontal copper pipe in the way.
My mistake...This IS drywall NOT plaster on gypsum lath...1/2 inch drywall to be precise. The replacement drywall is also 1/2 inch, which WOULD fit AND it would also fit right in the 3/4' space between the copper and galvanized pipes.

That being said, everything to the right of where I stopped breaking out the drywall, on the right is actually concrete block, where you see the copper pipe disappear into the wall.

You ask about mud and tape. I like FibaFuse. Google it. Otherwise use paper. It might be easier to find. I would use twenty minute mud. You might be happier with all purpose. It will need to dry between coats but if you get ridges it is easier to sand. The tighteryu run your mud of any type he better.
Paper, all-purpose mud (run lightly), let dry, then sand.


Last edited by c1351996; 01-09-16 at 02:30 PM.
 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,794
TN

01-09-16, 01:54 PM   #19  
Does this mean building a small frame out or wood and covering it with the drywall?
yes, build a wood frame out far enough to cover the exposed pipe and then install the drywall. IMO that would be easier and look better than trying to clean up the hole, add framing as needed and install/finish a drywall patch.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-10-16, 08:45 AM   #20  
Thanks!
NOW, I see the gypsum lath; it starts where I stopped demoing the 1/2" drywall on the right, where the wall becomes concrete block, therefore my 1/2" replacement piece WILL fit.

Would you all still frame this?
If yes, what type & size wood?
How would you attach the frame to wall, especially to the concrete block and floor?

Attached Images
     

Last edited by c1351996; 01-10-16 at 09:16 AM.
 
Handyone's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 5,451
CAL

01-10-16, 09:48 AM   #21  
It seems everyone agrees boxing in the pipe would look better and be easier than fixing the drywall.

I suggest you start by cutting your piece to cover the opening and the pipe. It can be drywall, prefinished wainscot paneling, whatever. Cut it to size, let's say it's 3' high x 6' wide.

Hold that piece up to the wall (pipe), level it, and measure how far out it protrudes from the existing drywall.
Say it's 1-1/2" out. Cut wood strips 1-1/2" wide and attach the strip to the panel at top, bottom, and sides. You now have a "box top" cover.
You can secure the cover to the wall however you like. If it flexes too much in the middle, you can add some spacers off the studs.


Brian
Cal Contractor

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-10-16, 02:49 PM   #22  
Posted By: Handyone It seems everyone agrees boxing in the pipe would look better and be easier than fixing the drywall.

I suggest you start by cutting your piece to cover the opening and the pipe. It can be drywall, prefinished wainscot paneling, whatever. Cut it to size, let's say it's 3' high x 6' wide.

Hold that piece up to the wall (pipe), level it, and measure how far out it protrudes from the existing drywall.
Say it's 1-1/2" out. Cut wood strips 1-1/2" wide and attach the strip to the panel at top, bottom, and sides. You now have a "box top" cover.
You can secure the cover to the wall however you like. If it flexes too much in the middle, you can add some spacers off the studs.
Thanks!
Holding the piece up to wall (hiding the piping) at the door on the left, it meets in the middle of the door casing. Thoughts?

Attached Images
      
 
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,971
VA

01-10-16, 03:19 PM   #23  
Nice to see everyone on board with my idea. And sorry about the motivational post in the beginning, but you are doing the right thing.

Remove the door casing and proceed to fix the wall. Frame, add Drywall, use corner bead on all outside corners, tape on inside corners. Finish the box off first and then cut the door casing to fit around the new box. Caulk the door casing to the new box and paint.

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-10-16, 04:25 PM   #24  
Thanks!
No problem, I do what I can. Framing is a good idea but now with having to remove, cut and replace the door casing, this is starting to become not so easy.

Also, with framing, I won't be able to open the door all the way or without the door handle hitting the new framing, unless I add some kind of door bumper or wall guard, which will cause the open the door even less.

With that said, just curious, would anyone go ahead and "fit the new piece around the pipe" and "cut a slot where pipe sticks out" like Handyone and pugsl originally suggested, respectively?

 
tightcoat's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,676
CAL

01-10-16, 07:18 PM   #25  
There is often, maybe usually, more than one way to do something. Your initial picture did not show the whole problem and most of us agree framing around the pipes is easier than cutting and fitting. Not absolutely better but certainly easier and more pleasing aesthetically. If you like looking at the pipe and want to cut and fit that is still an option..
Let us know what you do and how it turns out.

 
c1351996's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 369
FL

01-10-16, 08:29 PM   #26  
Posted By: tightcoat There is often, maybe usually, more than one way to do something. Your initial picture did not show the whole problem and most of us agree framing around the pipes is easier than cutting and fitting. Not absolutely better but certainly easier and more pleasing aesthetically. If you like looking at the pipe and want to cut and fit that is still an option...
Let us know what you do and how it turns out.
Thanks!
As everyone has helped me progress in the planning of this project, the whole problem has come to light through pics, along the way. That being said, finally seeing the whole problem, perhaps others may want to share a fully informed opinion?


Last edited by c1351996; 01-10-16 at 10:34 PM.
 
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,971
VA

01-11-16, 01:33 AM   #27  
The box should only go up the wall high enough to cover your pipe leaving what would be a shelf after the fact. It should not interfere with the door handle in any way.

 
Search this Thread