Fixing poor Drywall Patchwork


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Old 04-30-16, 12:13 PM
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Fixing poor Drywall Patchwork

Moved into a new house. Finding multiple areas with terrible drywall patch jobs. I attempted to sand one down as far as possible, I reached the mesh of the patch and couldn't go any further. It wouldn't be an issue but most patches are the size of a fist and one is about as big as a football. How do I fix these the right way. I don't want the areas to be noticeable at all. Preferably to look like they were never patched.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 01:28 PM
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Your images don't show anything. You might want to put something else next to it as a contrast or reference. As to how fix it? Wait for some one like Marksr to reply.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 02:09 PM
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#1, Patch never should have been done with mesh tape!
Now you have to build it up much thicker and wider to spread out the humps it makes.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 02:50 PM
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The problem is likely that the patch was not feathered out sufficiently. If you want to make it disappear you will need to use a 10" wide knife. Take your football sized patch... you need to start by applying a nice smooth layer of mud (less than 1/8" thick) over the patch to cover the tape, (which you likely should not have sanded all the way down to the tape.) I would use easy sand 20 for a repair like thus, if you wanted to try to get it done in an afternoon. All you want to do is put a square of mud over the patch. Don't over work it. After you apply the mud, you can kill the edges, tapering them slightly, by running the knife around the perimeter of the patch... 3/4 of the knife will be off the mud, and 1/4" will be on the mud... you press the knife tight to the wall where there is no mud and then twist your knife by lifting the other side of the knife. Easier to do Tha to explain. Basically you just want to kind of taper the mud a little on the edges... doesn't have to be be perfect.

Then once it's dry, you won apply any mud in the center... focus on the perimeter. Run your 10" knife around the perimeter of the patch, making a big circle around it. This will make your repaired area about the size of a 24" wide circle by the time you're done... maybe a little larger.

For your final coat, you can skim the whole thing with ordinary joint compound, which is a little easier to sand. If you put it on real thin, wiping it tight to the wall, it will dry pretty quickly.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 02:55 PM
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Hi JW and welcome to the forum. I'm glad Norm posted as I couldn't see anything either. But we will take your word to start . Try some pictures at an angle, not sure if it will lessen the flash washing them out.
Are these parches in one area or far apart? The reality is, a patch or butt joints will always have to deal with a bump. The lower and wider you can make it the less noticeable it will be.

Bud
 
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Old 04-30-16, 04:03 PM
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While most good repairs start with a little sanding, latex paints are not conducive to sanding. It's often better to apply more mud over a bigger area as described above. While I couldn't tell from the pic I suspect the wall has a little texture [maybe only roller stipple] Not duplicating the texture will make the repair stand out. Texture can be made from thinned down joint compound, the thinner the j/c - the lighter the texture will be.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 04:50 PM
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Name:  1462057496282.jpg
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Size:  11.2 KB thanks for all the input, having a heck of a time trying to get pictures from my phone straight to the site and finding the lighting to show what I'm talking about. Hopefully this image gives a little better insight. I understand spreading compound and feathering it out to put it short - is there anyway to match this to the surrounding wall? I don't suspect simply painting after feathering will accomplish this?
 
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Old 04-30-16, 05:05 PM
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It looks like you have a splatter texture. This is done with a hopper, thinned joint compound, and a air compressor. Compare the picture on this page... is that the kind of texture you have?
 
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Old 04-30-16, 05:27 PM
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Uncertain of the texture. Here is two more pictures. One of plain wall, the other with one of the 20 awful patch jobs that took place.Name:  20160430_192355.jpg
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Size:  22.0 KBName:  20160430_192422.jpg
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Size:  13.5 KB
 
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Old 04-30-16, 07:21 PM
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Much better pics. I would sand those down and reapply as the others have said. Many people won't agree with me, but I like using UGL's 222 LITE Spackle and patch. It has very little shrinkage.

 
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Old 05-01-16, 03:37 AM
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That is an orange peel texture. While I prefer to use a hopper gun you can buy aerosol cans of orange peel. On small repairs you can often get by using a sponge to 'pat' the thinned down j/c on. Unless I'm mistaken you can't thin down spackling to make texture. I don't use spackling mainly because I always have a bucket of j/c on hand
 
 

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