Drywall over medicine cabinet

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-30-16, 10:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 78
Drywall over medicine cabinet

I have a medicine cabinet I would like to drywall over. Picture is below. It is surrounded by studs. My question is, what is the easiest way to trim the drywall around it to expose the stud? I have a feeling that it is going to end in a crumbling mess and not a clean cut at all even using a utility knife. I don't have any drywall experience. Just trying to do it myself.

Name:  2016-05-30 13.36.30.jpg
Views: 315
Size:  13.3 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-30-16, 11:13 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 45,114
I would use an oscillating saw. Other than that.... sheetrock knife.

Oscillating Tools - Power Multi Tools - Power Tools - at - The Home Depot

If you don't have one..... they start at around $35 from places like Harbor Freight. Makes an awesome overall tool to have and right now.... the perfect choice for your personal Fathers Day gift.

On sale right now.... Oscillating Tools - Oscillating Multifunction Power Tools
I have the red Chicago model from HF. I use it constantly.
 
  #3  
Old 05-30-16, 11:23 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 3,138
Or just nail in some pieces of 1x2 or 2x2 to the existing frame and fasten the sheetrock to that. No trimming necessary.
 
  #4  
Old 05-30-16, 11:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
My vote goes to Carbide's suggestion. WAY easier to add the listings than to cut back for a half-lap on the existing framing.
 
  #5  
Old 05-30-16, 12:42 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 78
Thanks for the suggestions. I did read right after I posted about nailing in some 1x2 to existing frame. If I go that route, do I have to go all the way around the frame with the 1x2? Once it is in, how many dry walls screws do I need to use to go up each side and across top and bottom? Thanks, its all new to me so this helps.
 
  #6  
Old 05-30-16, 12:42 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,946
I also vote for CT's suggestion. I's just screw a 2x4 on each side. An advantage not mentioned is try to nail to close to the edge of Sheetrock it tends to crumble. Adding 2x4 you can get further from the edge. I say screw in the 2x4s because it is easier than nail. Drill slightly angled holes the size of the screws in the 2x4s you add to make screwing easy.
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-16, 01:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
Yep, 2x2, 2x3 or 2x4 will be easier than 1x material. You don't have to fit them in a precise manner, gaps at the ends of about an inch are just fine and dandy. I personally like to see screws every four to six inches but that may be overkill. I also use a bit of glue in addition to screws to hold the listings in place.
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-16, 02:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 78
Might be a silly question but rather ask then do something wrong. Can I attach the 2x2 or 2x3, etc, to the studs with extra dry wall screws? They just seem to sell big boxes of 50 screws when I only need like 10. So I'd rather not buy another box of screws. I'm figuring I can't use them.
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-16, 02:32 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 12,186
Yes. You can attach the 2x in any means necessary.
 
  #10  
Old 05-30-16, 03:43 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 1,472
You really should use 1-5/8" screws to attach the drywall, in which case you would need longer ones to attach the 2x's. It's probably a moot point in this case, but the reason for 1-5/8" screws is so that you won't contact properly installed electric cables, which should be routed through 3/4 holes in the center of the studs. In your case, you can see what you have, so yeah, I might just grab a handful of 2-1/2" screws from the shop myself. Your opening looks wider than 14-1/2", and it's probably fine, but, if so, I would toenail a vertical 2x in the center as well.
 
  #11  
Old 05-30-16, 04:08 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,946
Yes, 3" dry wall or deck screws. You need 3/16" holes drilled in the 2x4s your adding to keep them from being pushed away by the screws.

Another advantage to screws is they are kinder and gentler. Banging on a finished wall with a hammer may jar who knows what.
 
  #12  
Old 05-31-16, 03:12 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,813
Another vote for screwing in a 2x4 on each side.
I'd start the screws first then set the 2x4 in place and drive it home.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes