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Replacing a wide section of drywall


Victor43's Avatar
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08-07-16, 11:09 PM   #1  
Replacing a wide section of drywall

OK the question is simply if the width of the drywall (wall) to be cut out and replaced is nearly is slightly less than the distance between the studs then is it essential to screw in the replacement piece to the studs or can you use some sort of piece of wood to support the patched or new piece ? The reason that I am asking is because the stud is only 1.5" wide and if the cut is not perfect (vertically) then how will the new section of drywall stay in place. Also the section of the drywall to be cut out its width is less than the distance between the two vertical wall studs.

Also is it essential to use tape for the seams or can you just use joint compound without the need or use for tape ?

Thanks


Last edited by Victor43; 08-07-16 at 11:38 PM.
 
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08-08-16, 03:08 AM   #2  
If you want to ensure a good place to screw the new drywall, cut it the exact inside measurements of the studs (14 1/2"). Then place two 2x4 nailers in each side of the cut out and fasten them to the existing studs. You now have sufficient nailing space on the new drywall without having to worry about missing the stud or making an errant cut.

 
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08-08-16, 03:12 AM   #3  
Ya, it's a lot easier to add framing than try to cut the drywall away from half of a stud. It's also easier to cut the drywall in a straight line when using the edge of the stud as a guide.
You always tape drywall joints! Just using j/c [no tape] will result in the joint cracking.


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08-08-16, 07:25 AM   #4  
Use paper tape, not the mesh stuff.

 
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08-09-16, 02:07 AM   #5  
@thanks everyone. I understood that tape is essential but one question how should the layering be done so that the taped seam does not seem like an elevated vertical bump or vertical hill after the three coats of joint compound has been applied ?

 
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08-09-16, 03:00 AM   #6  
You float thinned mud around the area with a wide knife until it blends. You'll do that on your other 3 threads concerning sheetrock repair as well.

 
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08-09-16, 03:03 AM   #7  
Each coat of mud will be wider than the previous which will minimize any hump.


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08-09-16, 08:34 PM   #8  
Thank you very much everyone.

 
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