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How do I secure drywall with no stud


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01-28-17, 09:08 PM   #1  
How do I secure drywall with no stud

Hello all!
I have studs at the arrows but how do I secure the drywall piece in the middle with no stud?
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01-28-17, 09:17 PM   #2  
You either cut the drywall to fit the studs or add a stud.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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01-28-17, 09:28 PM   #3  
Thanks!
How do you add a stud?

 
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01-28-17, 10:05 PM   #4  
You toenail it to the top and bottom plate.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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01-29-17, 03:26 AM   #5  
Looks like it would be easier to cut drywall back to studs and either add a nailer to both sides or cut drywall 1/2 way into stud. That take a lot of practice.

 
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01-29-17, 03:29 AM   #6  
If it's just a short distance you can insert a piece of lumber and screw it to the existing piece of drywall leaving some lumber exposed to screw the new piece to. If it's full length you need to add a stud!


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01-29-17, 03:54 AM   #7  
I have studs at the arrows but how do I secure the drywall piece in the middle with no stud?
You guys must have better eyes, what are we looking at, is that a metal post in the middle or a "future" wall?

 
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01-29-17, 04:02 AM   #8  
I agree.
That picture makes no sense at all.
A picture from further back might give us some idea of what we are looking at.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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01-29-17, 04:19 AM   #9  
Glad I'm not the only one that didn't understand the pic .... which is why I gave a generic answer.


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01-29-17, 05:19 AM   #10  
I missed that also'....................

 
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01-29-17, 05:39 AM   #11  
He already has up dry wall at the stud on each side. So the studs are behind the dry wall. He is just saying that he has studs in the existing wall behind the two outside pieces of dry wall, but no stud behind the center piece.

If it were me, I'd either take down the two outside pieces of dry wall & add one whole piece on the exiting studs, IF the distance between the studs is 48". If not, I'd just add TWO studs (thats just me) at each of the two existing joints of drywall.

To add a stud, just go to the hardware store & get a 2X4 "stud". Just stand it up in the existing wall at the edge of the dry wall & drive a nail in the top & bottom of the stud at an angle. Make sure you divide the difference of the stud between the edge of both sheets of drywall so you can screw each sheet of dry wall to the stud.

 
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01-29-17, 06:34 AM   #12  
Posted By: marksr If it's just a short distance you can insert a piece of lumber and screw it to the existing piece of drywall leaving some lumber exposed to screw the new piece to...
Ideally, what size piece of lumber would be inserted?

Posted By: Dixie2012 He already has up dry wall at the stud on each side. So the studs are behind the dry wall. He is just saying that he has studs in the existing wall behind the two outside pieces of dry wall, but no stud behind the center piece...
What Dixie2012 said!

My apologies for the confusing pic.. I'm not at location so I'll do my best to be more clear. This is a small top left corner of a larger rectangle area between 2 studs, which are 16" on center. I used leftover pieces of drywall, which I had to cut to fit so drywall is up temporarily, to check fit.

 
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01-29-17, 06:40 AM   #13  
So that is not a steel I beam we are looking at? If not, then cut 4 pieces of 1x4 13" long, remove your fitted piece and place the 1x4's laterally between the studs, behind the drywall, screwing them through the drywall on either side. Now, you have sufficient support to apply your new drywall piece and tape and mud. I would cut is a little better, but you have what you have.

 
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01-29-17, 09:11 AM   #14  
Nope, not a steel I beam...Just a gap as drywall is not screwed in, yet. How about using 1x2s and/or small scrap pieces of 5/8 in. x 5-1/2 in pressure treated fencing, as follows?:

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01-29-17, 09:52 AM   #15  
I know I wouldnt do it like that. For me, it just wouldnt give either of the three pieces (especially the center piece) enough stability. But, I'd like to know the size of that center piece.

 
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01-29-17, 10:05 AM   #16  
Nope, like this. One, top, two midspan and one bottom.

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02-06-17, 09:45 AM   #17  
Posted By: Dixie2012
...I'd like to know the size of that center piece.
The size of that center piece is 10".

 
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02-06-17, 11:30 AM   #18  
If its only 10", I'd take each of the side pieces back to the center of each stud & put in one piece from center of each stud where you have your red arrows. Personally, I'd never try patching in a piece like your picture shows.
1) there is way too much gap between each sheet
2) you're going to have three seams to patch &
3) for me, I think it'd be more work to add 2 studs & patch those three pieces than cut back to the center of the studs on either side & put in once piece.

That's just me. Its what I would do.

Good luck

 
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02-06-17, 02:17 PM   #19  
Posted By: Dixie2012 If its only 10", I'd take each of the side pieces back to the center of each stud & put in one piece from center of each stud where you have your red arrows. Personally, I'd never try patching in a piece like your picture shows.
1) there is way too much gap between each sheet
2) you're going to have three seams to patch &
3) for me, I think it'd be more work to add 2 studs & patch those three pieces than cut back to the center of the studs on either side & put in once piece.

That's just me. Its what I would do.

Good luck
Thanks!
I know it's not ideal but I only had a scrap piece to use without having to buy a full sheet, which I have no idea, how I'd get it home in my Civic so I'd have to rent a truck for one sheet...A 2'x2' is too short.
1) The gaps aren't as bad as they look. I haven't screwed anything in, yet and the middle piece is leaning back and to right, in the pic.
2) Yes, three seams...Could be good practice, as this will be my first attempt at drywall. FWIW, this is in garage.
3) I could get away with two pieces, if I buy another full sheet because there is a copper pipe to cut in, where the middle piece meets the piece to the right.

 
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02-06-17, 02:32 PM   #20  
You might check some houses under construction or being remodeled, they'd likely give you what you need out of their scrap pile.


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02-06-17, 02:55 PM   #21  
3) I could get away with two pieces, if I buy another full sheet because there is a copper pipe to cut in, where the middle piece meets the piece to the right.
No matter how you repair this, if there is a copper pipe back there (water, electrical, whatever) make SURE you remember to measure & mark where this copper pipe is so you wont run a screw (or nail) into that pipe when screwing (or nailing) up your drywall. Its important that you remember to do this... measure & mark so you know where it is once the drywall is up.

 
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02-10-17, 11:43 AM   #22  
Posted By: marksr

You might check some houses under construction or being remodeled, they'd likely give you what you need out of their scrap pile.
That is a great idea, thanks!

 
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02-10-17, 11:46 AM   #23  
Posted By: Dixie2012 No matter how you repair this, if there is a copper pipe back there (water, electrical, whatever) make SURE you remember to measure & mark where this copper pipe is so you wont run a screw (or nail) into that pipe when screwing (or nailing) up your drywall. Its important that you remember to do this... measure & mark so you know where it is once the drywall is up.
I will make sure I do that, thanks!

 
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