Over-patch on concrete slab?

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  #1  
Old 02-01-17, 07:36 AM
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Cool Over-patch on concrete slab?

Hi again - back for more help.

50+ year old concrete block house seems to have been over-patched in places. Bedroom wall (Concrete not drywall - they don't put drywall over concrete do they?) has lumps of some kind of patch with many layers of paint over it. Looks like someone got overzealous removing drapery hardware and had to do some heavy patching. A couple of times. It sticks out of the wall up 1/8" to 1/4" in places. The biggest area is about 6" wide. wide. Some as small as an inch or two.

What is the best way to fix these? Do I go in with a chisel, scraper? dremel?
What about after I get the excess off? What do I use to even it out? Suggestions for creating a workable texture?

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  #2  
Old 02-01-17, 07:41 AM
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I used to live in fla, most of the block houses have the interior walls furred out and then drywall attached to the furring strips. I did rent a house long ago that was built in the 50's - all the interior walls were concrete block. Either way, I'd just scrape it a little and apply joint compound as needed to smooth it out, then texture to match.
 
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Old 02-01-17, 04:11 PM
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If the wall is solid and dry I see no reason why you could not use drywall compound to fill them. Getting the texture is the question.

When we lived in CA they had stucco finish, think is was also called knock down. I actually liked it vs the smooth walls we now have.

Anyway they sold an aerosol can of texture with different nozzles, basically a spray drywall compound.

You had to work at it and feather it out but I was happy with the patch job. Might be something you could try!
 
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Old 02-03-17, 05:26 AM
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Thank you for the help.
Not quite sure what to use to scrape with but I'll see what the big box place has. I just need to remember to take is slowly. Love the idea of the spray on texture. I'm sure it will look better than it did before.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 05:56 AM
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I'd just use a stiff putty knife to scrape it. Basically all you need to do is knock down any high spots prior to applying j/c.
 
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Old 02-03-17, 06:15 AM
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Well that sounds easier than I thought it might be then. I'm ready for a DIY task to go smoothly.
 
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Old 02-04-17, 07:56 AM
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oh oh

Am I getting a little over-zealous here? Part of that looks like the brick.
But to the right where it looks like there are pencil marks - it's still raised some.
So I stop here and try to do a feathering thing or something?
 
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Old 02-04-17, 09:30 AM
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What happens if you lay a straight edge across that area? If it is all low you don't need to remove any more assuming it's all bonded to the wall. If there is a high spot you can either chip away at it or feathered out your repair further to hide it.
 
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Old 02-04-17, 11:45 AM
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It's even. I was just afraid I was going too far. So now I have uncovered some places where they used the big anchors in the wall and theres a big hole now. Do I fill that with joint compound or try to squeeze caulk in there or???
I keep forgetting that starting something can open up another whole can of worms. I'm realizing that ceiling needs painting now too. Good time for it I guess.
Thanks again for your help.
 
  #10  
Old 02-04-17, 01:50 PM
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Joint compound is fine for the anchor holes. If the holes are big you'll need to apply a coat of j/c, let it dry and hit it again as thickly applied j/c tends to crack as it dries. I'd use a setting compound like Durabond as it won't have that issue and dries quicker but regular j/c will do fine.
 
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