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How to drywall ceiling around drain pipes.


SturdyNail's Avatar
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02-08-17, 07:29 PM   #1  
How to drywall ceiling around drain pipes.

Hello,

My son had to have some plumbing work done to fix a leak. What he is left with is a piece of the ceiling drywall missing and drain pipes coming down through that open space, as shown here:
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I told him I'd patch it if I could, but I'm not sure how to patch around those pipes. I was thinking of adding blocking between the joists--running as close as possible to the pipes so I have something to screw the drywall to.
Are there any hinged "boots" or collars available to fit around the pipes?

Thanks in advance for your ideas.

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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02-08-17, 07:44 PM   #2  
Might be easier if you cut out more drywall on the back side and left side of the pipes. Cut the drywall so that it is a perfect rectangle, with sides that are parallel... not odd shaped. I would attach cleats to the joists on the left and right, (3/4" above the bottom edge of the joists) then fit some 3/4 plywood between the joists so that it fits nicely around the pipes. (Cut the plywood, mark center of the holes then cut the holes with a hole saw) then cut that piece in half through the middle of both holes. Now you can insert those 2 pieces around either side of the pipes. Attach to the cleats. The bottom of the plywood will then be flush wit the bottom of the joists. Cut the drywall the exact same way and then screw it to the 3/4 plywood.

 
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02-08-17, 08:01 PM   #3  
Exactly. You can you tube "how to drywall around pipes" for several videos.

 
marksr's Avatar
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02-09-17, 04:42 AM   #4  
While the better you make the drywall fit, the easier it will be to finish but tape and mud can hide a lot of errors


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SturdyNail's Avatar
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02-09-17, 09:42 AM   #5  
@xsleeper, thanks. I like the idea of using 3/4" ply. It seems like it will be a bit tricky to get the holes to line up properly. I'll probably mock it up with cardboard first.

Thanks @Norm201. I'm going to head over to YouTube now.

@marksr, my taping and mudding leaves much to be desired, but I will give it my best shot :-)

 
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02-09-17, 09:48 AM   #6  
Like I said, starting with a nice rectangle hole makes everything easier. Then all you have to do is measure to the center of each pipe... make an X, and know the pipe diameter.

 
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07-18-17, 11:06 PM   #7  
Same boat plus floor and wires

Hi all - I'm having a similar issue. I live in a 3-family home and there was an issue with the main drain that runs through all 3 units. Now I'm left with a big hole in the ceiling and the floor (I'm snug in the middle of my neighbors).
Besides the drain pipe, there is also the hot/cold pipes to the 3rd unit, some romex wiring going up there, and a hole in the floor.

Previously it was all covered by plywood, as a box from the ceiling to the top of the cabinet. Below the cabinet was just covered up with duct tape (no clue why). The hole in the floor may have been there all along.

Anyway, what I want to do is replace the chase, but this time from floor to ceiling as much as possible. I have an idea for the ceiling given your responses already, but how should I deal with the floor? The wires - should they be contained in some way?

The pics are of the old galvanized pipe. Its now replaced by PVC but still same set up.

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marksr's Avatar
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07-19-17, 02:40 AM   #8  
Welcome to the forums slimavarela!

Assuming it's not feasible to relocate the plumbing and wiring I'd build a frame and cover it with drywall. Maybe tile the bottom portion if you can get matching tiles. Under the cabinet I'd just cover it with a plywood box.


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pugsl's Avatar
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07-19-17, 03:44 AM   #9  
Just frame it out but go as far to right from window as you can Will give room for curtains.

 
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07-19-17, 03:15 PM   #10  
Thank you for the welcoming!
Those both sound like good solutions.
Should I tie down the wires to something? Or is it alright to just let them sort of be free within the box? Will the hot water pipe damage them at all?
Thanks again, you all!

 
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07-20-17, 02:58 AM   #11  
Is that PVC in the pic under the cabinet? PVC isn't rated for hot water although CPVC is. Are you certain it's a hot water pipe?


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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