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Painting after drywall repairs


Michael Rivers's Avatar
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03-01-17, 11:26 AM   #1  
Painting after drywall repairs

I'm doing several repairs in my bathroom and will do at least a few patches throughout the house. The bathroom, at the very least, will get all new painting. How should that be done?

First concern; the bathroom walls are horrible and (unless you tell me otherwise) I will using a lot of joint compound and sanding to smooth out all walls and build up a 2-sq-ft section where the sheet rock is sunken about 1/4".

Second; (again, tell me not to) I plan on painting a semigloss.

1) Should I use Gardz everywhere? Is an oil primer sufficient (if the latter, what brand should I use)?
2) How should the buildup be done? Sand wall, prime, compound, sand, prime, paint; or sand, compound, prime, paint?
3) Is any acrylic fine after oil primer?

Anything else you think I should know?

Thanks

 
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03-01-17, 11:37 AM   #2  
Gardz is usually only called for when painting over exposed gypsum [where the drywall paper is torn] or to seal leftover wallpaper adhesive. Oil base primer is only needed to seal stains and/or create a bond over oil base enamels [when switching to latex] Latex can be applied over oil base primer.

What type of paint and what condition are the bath rm walls in before you apply the joint compound?


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03-01-17, 11:47 AM   #3  
lots of thin coats of compound, min sanding, final step is good PVA primer over the patches.

What type of paint is there now?

 
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03-01-17, 11:54 AM   #4  
I've always considered PVA primers not to be the best primers although they are generally adequate when priming raw drywall/joint compound followed by flat wall paint. Not the best primer if the top coat is going to be an enamel. It usually best to use the primer stated [or similar] on the finish paint's label.


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03-01-17, 12:08 PM   #5  
1) Looks like no reason to use Gardz. Good to know.

2) No idea what paint is on the walls. How can I test?

3) Walls are generally ok. I'm doing a few patches where I removed unused baseboard heater control and wires, repaired around the tub, and replaced a receptacle. There is one 2-sq-ft. area that is rather concave ( ") that I want to fill in since it would affect the baseboard molding. Finally, there is another area that was obviously (and poorly) patched that I want to sand smooth and fill.

What's your suggestion(s) on paint to use?

Thank again

 
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03-01-17, 12:47 PM   #6  
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html

Most any latex primer works over raw joint compound but the better primers will seal better making the sheen of any latex enamel you apply hold out better. If this is a bath with a shower, I'd recommend using a bath enamel [has extra mildewcide and is formulated for the harsher environment]


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03-01-17, 01:20 PM   #7  
Bath enamel it is, then. Thanks.

Pretty sure the only alcohol I have lying around is distilled. Maybe I can find goof off at the office. I'll try to do that test soon.

 
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03-02-17, 05:59 AM   #8  
Do you recommend a brand of paint for bath enamel? Home Depot is easiest for me, but I do have a few other options.

 
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03-02-17, 06:07 AM   #9  
I believe I can speak for Mark and say neither he nor I would buy paint at Home Depot. Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore and the two lines which get the most endorsement around here but keep in mind all manufacturers make multiple lines of paint and I wouldn't use anyone's lowest line. For what it's worth, Zinsser Perma-White is often considered to be the best kitchen and bath paint but it can't be tinted all that much so it's a good choice if you want white or something soft; bold colors won't work.

 
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03-02-17, 06:15 AM   #10  
I don't buy paint at HD but they might sell some Zinnser primers. Zinnser's 1-2-3 primer would be a good choice. If they also sell the PermaWhite and white or light pastel works for you - that would be a good option. Otherwise go to a local paint store [not dept] and discuss your needs/budget with them.


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03-02-17, 06:48 AM   #11  
Both Bengamin Moore and Sherwin Williams are available here. I'll speak with someone.

Thanks again

 
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03-02-17, 07:02 AM   #12  
In small towns I don't mind using Do it Best paints... says right on the can that its made by SW. I have always found them to be high quality paints.

 
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03-02-17, 07:06 AM   #13  
I don't think I've ever used that brand/line of paint. SWP makes some great paint but they also have some bargain basement coatings that I won't use. Same thing with Glidden. A lot of folks now think that Glidden paint is terrible because of the Glidden line that is sold at a big box store - it's their bottom line coating I've used it before but will not use it if I have any say about the paint purchase!


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03-02-17, 07:17 AM   #14  
But I'd be fine going with SW's Bath Paint? I'd be more than just a little pissed if I spent $60 on a gallon of paint that didn't work well.

Hmm. Should I be using that expensive paint for all the trim as well? This simple "replace the bathroom carpet with LVP" project escalated quickly. I'm very upset that I did the floor before I came up with all these many other issues.

 
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03-02-17, 08:38 AM   #15  
IMO, trying to save a couple bucks on paint is never worth it.

 
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03-02-17, 08:58 AM   #16  
Agreed. I'm just trying to be certain that what I do buy IS the correct one for the project.

 
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03-02-17, 09:38 AM   #17  
You don't generally want to use wall paint on doors and trim. You would use a paint specifically for trim, like SW ProClassic waterborne enamel. Paint trim first, then you will be able to cut in with your wall color later.

 
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03-02-17, 10:18 AM   #18  
I would have painted the other way. Thank you for preemptively correcting me.

 
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03-02-17, 12:14 PM   #19  
I really like the SWP ProClassic waterborne enamel! While trim enamel can be used on walls, wall enamel shouldn't be used on trim. IMO it looks best if the trim has more sheen than the walls. I like satin or eggshell on the bath walls with semi-gloss on the woodwork. .... but it's not like there is any set rules As far as I know SWP's bath paint only comes in their higher grade coatings.

While the trim can be painted first or last - it's easier to paint it first .... except the baseboard, you'd paint it last.


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03-02-17, 01:44 PM   #20  
Slightly tangential;
Since I do not have the baseboard yet, should I paint it before I install it and then touch up the nail holes, or install it first?

 
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03-02-17, 02:04 PM   #21  
I'd prime and apply 1 coat of enamel before it's installed, then caulk/putty and apply a 2nd coat of enamel.


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03-02-17, 04:50 PM   #22  
I'd finish painting all the trim on the wall, (prepainting is fine) and then just put a little painters tape on the baseboard after its been caulked and cut in but before i roll to keep it clean- to keep any roller splatter off of it. But I'm sure Mark has painted miles and miles more than I have.

 
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03-03-17, 03:12 AM   #23  
About the only time I've taped off the base is when painting walls with stained trim. It's best to pull the tape as soon as you are done in case any paint has seeped under the tape [so you can wipe it off while wet] although with painted base it isn't a big deal to touch up those areas when dry. Personally I wouldn't use tape ..... but whatever works

I'd hate to know how many miles of base I've painted over the years.


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