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Few Mudding Questions


danalfrancey's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2017
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03-22-17, 06:02 PM   #1  
Few Mudding Questions

First time doing a project with taping/mudding and I learned watching youtube videos if that means anything. But i'm having a few issues and hoped to get some feedback.

1. Over the 200' of tape I put down there is one strip where the tape was too dry and there are a few bubbles in a 1 foot section. How are those best dealt with since they have a coat of mud on top? Cut out the piece and just replace the tape? Pop them to release the air and mud over??

2. When I am applying the second coat of mud I am seeing a lot of streaks form. I cant tell if it is just contamination of the mud with small dry pieces or dust. It happens at random places in the 10" knife path. I tried adding some water and remixing my mud and it helped a little but they still appear now and then. Its going to make the top coat difficult!

3. I used all purpose pre-mix so far.. should I switch to another product for the final coat? I am almost out of my current 4.5gal container and need more anyway. It looks like the stuff you mix with cold water might work better?

4. If I switch to the product that isn't premixed, it looks like it is sold in specific working times. How do you do a large project with product like this? I get that I can and should mix small batches, but doesn't the container you mix in keep turning hard? And doesn't the mud pan get full of hard nasties while you mix a new batch?

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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03-22-17, 07:30 PM   #2  
1. Cut it out. You can't mud over it or it will bubble.

2. You are probably picking up dried bits of mud that you are the wiping into your pan. You need to practice keeping your mud clean by keeping a eye out for those bits and scraping them off the walls and corners before you mud. If you have crap in your mud that is on your knife you don't put all that mud back in your pan. You also need to make sure the bucket stays clean and that as you use it make sure dried bits around the edge don't fall in and contaminate the whole bucket. Scrape the bucket rim down and throw it away... if any bits fall in the bucket, skim them off and throw it away... I always wash the bucket sides with a wet cloth and keep it clean. Lid should be kept on when its not in use and should be clean as well. Bucket mud also needs to be mixed with a heavy duty drill and paddle, with a bit of water. Contrary to what many think it is not always "ready to use".

3. No.

4. Setting compounds are generally not intended for the final coat. They are used more for taping and second coats. It is harder and less prone to cracking, which is why it is often used as the first coat. Since it is harder you will also find that even though it is called easy sand, it does not sand as quickly as the premixed joint compound does. Easy Sand is on the label to distinguish it from the brown sack durabond that is NOT easy to sand at all. When setting compound starts to get hard in the pan you scrape the pan out and throw it away, then wash the pan before mixing another small batch.

 
danalfrancey's Avatar
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03-24-17, 10:06 AM   #3  
Thank you xsleeper,

Another question has come up for me,

I used all purpose joint compound to attach tape, after drying I covered it with a second coat of all purpose. Then Sanded.. and now coated with a 3rd coat, this time light weight joint compound. Its 1/2" drywall and these are beveled joints.

After sanding again (which was minimal) I can still faintly see tape through the mud in places. Will that be a problem down the road or should I do a 4th coat? The transition feels smooth and even by hand.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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03-24-17, 10:19 AM   #4  
As long as the tape is covered and hasn't fuzzed when you sand it, it will be fine. I suspect you didnt wipe the tape down tight with your knife so it must be slightly raised.

Check your joints with your widest knife. Hold it across the joint, perpendicular to the wall, and look to see if there is any gap. If there is a gap, the recessed joint isn't full. Also get a bright light (i use 300 watt) in there and check your work.

 
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03-24-17, 10:48 AM   #5  
One of the biggest "technical" things I learned about mudding was cleanliness. Your hock/tray and knife must be clean. Hardened blobs will cause annoying streaks when you go to apply the mud. The cleanliness also applies to the bucket. Always keep the lid on the bucket and plastic sheet spread evenly over the mud to prevent it from drying out. Use a smaller knife to wipe all the mud off the walls of the bucket and smooth the mud before laying down the plastic sheet, especially when calling it quits for the day. I even follow up with a damp rag to make sure there is no mud stuck to the sides that can harden and fall into the mud.

Generally you should not see the tape. Like XSleeper mentioned as long as you haven't fuzzed the paper it will take paint OK. If you did sand into the paper it creates a fuzz that will show through the paint. In that case you will need to skim on another coat.

When mudding and especially sanding and inspecting before paint you can not have too much light. I often set up a high powered work light close to the wall and shining down the wall to help make defects stand out. It's amazing how a coat of paint can make defects magically appear so paying careful attention before painting really pays off.

 
marksr's Avatar
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03-25-17, 03:16 AM   #6  
... and if defects show up during the primer coat it's no big deal to make repairs, sand and spot prime before moving on to the finish coat of paint.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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