drywall joint over existing texture


  #1  
Old 05-27-17, 07:56 PM
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drywall joint over existing texture

Hi all,

I thought I had enough paint scraped away to avoid this, but here I am with a joint mudded over the adjacent texture and paint.

What's the best way to finish this off?
Sand down to as flat as possible? Scrape everything flat with a knife? Dig out the whole thing and start over?
Any tricks?

This is a first coat with setting compound on ceiling (pic is rotated 90 deg, sorry)

Thanks for any help. I'm a first timer at this and it's going slow.

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Last edited by chandler; 05-28-17 at 03:25 AM.
  #2  
Old 05-28-17, 03:05 AM
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Sand and/or add j/c as needed to get it smooth. Then you'd texture the repair to match the rest.
 
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Old 05-28-17, 04:48 AM
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Blend the patch into the existing texture by using a damp sponge and work the higher JC down so that it eases into the texture around it. Then you add texture to the areas that need it to blend completely.
 
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Old 05-28-17, 05:24 AM
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This is a first coat with setting compound
Setting compounds aren't water soluble so a damp sponge won't work if the setting compound has already dried.
 
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Old 05-28-17, 07:17 AM
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While setting type compounds are harder, You can rub them down with a damp sponge to blend it into the existing texture. Takes some elbow grease, but it will make for a better patch. I use setting type compound exclusively and have done this numerous times.

First, scrape with a wide drywall knife to take down all the bumps and ridges in the new compound and then work on the edges until you get a better blend.
 
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Old 05-28-17, 07:57 AM
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You can use a sanding sponge, which also keeps the dust down.
Your patch is not that bad, don't be afraid to add a little more mud in a thin layer.
Mix your mud nice and creamy and spread it thin in one try with a wide knife. Once you get one nice coat, sanding should be easy.
You can match the texture with orange peel texture in an aerosol can.
 
 

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