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Crappy work coming back to haunt me.


skeeter_ca's Avatar
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CAL

12-08-17, 07:01 PM   #1  
Crappy work coming back to haunt me.

I had a door installed in my bedroom going outside to the pool area about 10 years ago when we bought our house. Everything was fine till this summer during a rain the carpet became wet. It appeared to be coming from under the threshold after splashing on the patio bricks. I decided to replace the door and seal the new one up good. When I pulled the old door frame I found the worst install job I have ever heard of. No sealant or sealing attempt of any kind. The only caulking was around the outside trim pieces and those were coming off by themselves. Two studs were cut out to make room for the door with a little still hanging from the top to act as cripple studs. . Two trimmer studs installed with two 2x4's acting as a header not fully touching the cripple studs and a couple shims shoved between the header studs. When I moved them with my hands they fell out. The whole frame could rock back and forth and was only attached to the house by the dry wall nails and toe nailed at the bottom. This pisses me off so much. If the installer guy had not died several years ago I would be giving him a call.

Sorry got off track. What I would like to know is how should I treat the stucco as shown in the pictures concerning a vapor barrier. It is torn back almost all the way back to the studs about 8" all the way around.

skeeter

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XSleeper's Avatar
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12-08-17, 07:10 PM   #2  
Stucco is usually hammered out a minimum of 6" away from a door so that the paper can be salvaged and lapped 6". Your problem is that you have no sheathing... just paper over the studs. Any hammering will ruin the paper. And if you only have a couple inches of paper left to begin with, that's not much for overlapping.

Stucco is difficult to do correctly, so we would usually recommend a professional for something like this. Do you intend to try and diy?

You also need a king and trimmer studs and a header and your electrical is kind of in the way.

 
skeeter_ca's Avatar
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12-08-17, 07:23 PM   #3  
I thought he was a professional!

Yes I am planning DIY. I am also planning on installing king studs, trimmers and a header with solid contact with the top sill plate. I should be able to work around the wiring.

So I should overlap the current paper as far back as I can but do I attach it to the stucco someway or the door frame once installed.

skeeter


Last edited by skeeter_ca; 12-08-17 at 07:47 PM.
 
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
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12-09-17, 04:05 AM   #4  
Sleeper is the pro here but I will add my suggestion.

I would try to do all the work on the drywall side and avoid messing with the stucco as much as possible. Perhaps you could use spray foam to act as a vapor barrier?


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tightcoat's Avatar
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12-09-17, 05:47 AM   #5  
Use a notched mason chisel and cut the stucco next to but on the far side of the stud from the opening. Don't beat too hard. you want to cut the stucco not keep breaking it back. You have the advantage of being able to get to the back side of the stucco. Hold a heavy hammer against the back side or have a partner do it then on the face hit against the backer to crumble the stucco out of the woven wire. Once you have this done and the cut made on the far side of the stud you can slip paper behind the existing. At the head you don't have to be quite so careful with the underlap because it is protected by the overhang. You still need to expose some woven wire in order to tie new lath to the old. I prefer diamond mesh metal lath for patches. if you have it, even better than a mason chisel and hammer is a small pneumatic chisel to make the cut. Don't let it beat too hard. It is hard not to cut the paper. that is why you cut to the far side of the stud. the stud supports the stucco better than cutting in between studs but once it is open on the far side you can slip new paper back there. The more lap the better but sometimes you have to settle for what you get.

 
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12-09-17, 08:57 PM   #6  
if you lath this with diamond mesh metal lath as I suggest you should make sure thelathfills the whole area. thewovenwire is too coarse to hold the stucco without some kind of backing and paper alone is not enoughbecause it is not taut. That works in large areas butnot so well in patches thus the diamondmesh lath cut to fit the opening precisely. as far as I can tell it matters not ifthe wovenwire laps over or under the new lath. I have doneit bothways and usually do what is easier in whichever case.

 
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