How to repair this wall ?

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  #1  
Old 03-21-19, 10:41 AM
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How to repair this wall ?

Hello,
I am looking to repair this wall under one of my windows in my home. Built in 1957. The wall has been cracking/bubbling for a while, so today I took a scraper and scraped off what I could. I assume the damage was maybe from the old wood windows leaking, but I replaced the windows two years ago. The wall itself seems solid, except for obviously the layer I'm scraping away. How do I fix this? They're plaster walls, should I buy some plaster and go over this? Use joint compound? Any help appreciated. Looking to paint this area soon which is why I decided to handle this now.

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  #2  
Old 03-21-19, 10:48 AM
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I'm sure actual plaster would be best but that's outside of my skill set. What I would do is; scrape off all the loose, prime the area with Zinnser's Gardz and then skim coat as needed with a setting compound like Durabond. Durabond closely resembles plaster in strength/hardness. The prime coat gives the setting compound a leg up on adhesion. Regular pre mix joint compound dries softer/slower and is water soluble.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-19, 04:52 PM
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What marksr says. I like to use EasySand by USG or a competing brand. DuraBond is also by USG. It is harder and stronger than the EasySand (18# per bag) materials. It is nigh unto impossible to sand so if you use it keep the old work clean. That is don't lap the new over the old. When it is still wet scrape or wipe the old work clean. Maybe you will want to put one coat of regular joint compound over the repaired area to smooth it out a little better and it is sandable.
I would do this with plaster but plaster is not as amateur friendly as the light weight setting compounds.
 
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Old 03-23-19, 12:15 PM
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I tried plaster repair in the past, and it didnt go so well Haha. Wasnt really able to sand and made a mees. I am leaning towards the regular joint compound. Just wasnt sure if joint compound would adhere to this, and I'm sure I'll need to do multiple layers. Would using just joint compound to slowly build the wall back up here not be a good idea?
 
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Old 03-23-19, 01:22 PM
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The only reason not to use regular joint mud is the time it takes to let it dry. If you put on too much it shrinks and cracks and I think that weakens the bond. But if you make a mistake it can be sanded out and more put on if you take off too much.
 
  #6  
Old 03-31-19, 01:52 PM
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Thanks for the responses.
I am going to chip away as much as i can and begin the repair on this wall. My only question is about the zinnser gards that was mentioned. Should the zinnser gards be applied over this wall/cement like texture before I apply the skim coats of joint compound? Also after sanding and smoothing the area, should I apply another coat of the zinnser gards over the newly smoothed repair area before paint?
Thanks in advance!
 
  #7  
Old 03-31-19, 02:20 PM
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The gardz is a single coat only to prepare the plaster so that your mud can bond. Do it once, after you chip off loose plaster.
 
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Old 04-05-19, 09:43 AM
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Thank you for all of the responses so far. Today I took the bottom trim off around the window and chipped away all loose paint/plaster and heres what I ended up with.
1. Should I use some great stuff window foam and fill in the crack between the bottom of the window frame and the wall framing?
2. The part of plaster where theres a chunk missing- how do I fix this? I know I cant just mush compound in it. The wall is about 1/2 inch- 3/4 thick. Should I just cut it out and replace with drywall? Other than that spot towards the top, the rest seems relatively solid.

As always, any input appreciated!
 
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Old 04-05-19, 09:56 AM
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Yes, fill the gap with spray foam but you don't want it to gush out past the jamb, so use it very sparingly... get the straw as far back as you reasonably can and go easy on it, don't spray full blast.

The void, you need to cut away anything loose, any paper, etc. Prime everything in and around the void with oil primer. Once the primer is fully dry, fill the void with setting compound. For that sort of thing I usually will have a bag of 5 minute setting compound. (Comes in bag form, you mix up what you need with water and a 4" knife in a drywall pan. Mix it as stiff as you can, it should not drip off your knife. Work fast or it will set up on you if you stir it too long.)

Stick a thin board or piece of plywood into the gap below the jamb so that it sticks our like a form... then apply the 5 minute mud. Be sure you press it into the void tightly. Lay it on smooth as possible, flush with the plaster... don't build it out thicker than the plaster or spread it way out onto the plaster. Once it's dry tap the form out of there then you can tape the approximate edge of where the chunk was missing to reinforce the patch, then continue skimming over the wall.
 
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Old 04-05-19, 10:07 AM
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I bought some zinnser gardz like what was recommended earlier in the post, will that work as the primer?
I will have to get the setting compound as I only have the stuff that comes premixed in a tub. When you say "tape the edge of the chunk that was missing" do you mean put drywall mesh tape around it?
Thank you!
 
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Old 04-05-19, 10:11 AM
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Gardz will work. I don't use mesh tape. But yes, you would tape over the 5 minute mud or if you are fast, lay the mesh tape into the repair after you spread it on and smooth it out, pressing the tape lightly into the surface. You will want it a little runnier if you are using mesh tape.

Yeah, don't use premixed mud for this. Only for the skimming afterward.
 
  #12  
Old 04-05-19, 02:29 PM
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To what X says I would add will this be covered by trim or molding? Maybe you don't really need to fill the missing chunk at all. Some outlets sell the five minute mud in little cartons that are probably about 5#. The bags are 18#. The little carton will cost almost as much as the bag. I would buy the bag and use it to start evening out the plaster. You might not be able to work fast enough to use 5 minute mud. you can try 20 minute or 45 minute. You could use that material as X describes. You will have to wait a bit longer to do the next operation. Do it before lunch and come back and smooth it off and do the rest of the work. There is nothing inherently wrong with using the premix stuff on the rest of the area. it will likely take two or maybe even three coats to get it flat and smooth. The advantage of the setting mud is that you can do it all the same day rather than over a two or three day period.
 
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Old 04-05-19, 04:14 PM
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Thank you for you're input guys. About half of the area missing will be covered by trim, so definitely would need to fill in at least some of the missing chunk anyways.
When I fill the missing spot- I would think you would want to do that in coats rather than just all at once.. wouldnt the mud not dry right and crack if its too thick?
I could be completely wrong, but just figured I'd ask.
 
  #14  
Old 04-05-19, 04:26 PM
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That is why you fill it with the setting compound. You fill it 99% full with that, then you skim over it with regular joint compound. Setting compound doesn't shrink as it dries, so fill it up. This isn't our first rodeo.
 
  #15  
Old 04-05-19, 04:46 PM
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Figured I'd confirm with the experts first thanks again guys!
 
  #16  
Old 04-06-19, 03:15 AM
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Setting muds dry chemically, that's why they can be applied in thicker coats. Regular j/c dries by evaporation and will shrink some as it dries. It will crack if it's applied too thick. Plus it's difficult for the mud deep in the repair to dry.

Not sure if it was mentioned earlier but setting compound has set time frame it can be used before it hardens. Any unused mixed mud needs to be discarded before it sets up in the pan. Instead of mixing up the whole bag you only want to mix up what you can use before it sets.
 
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