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Bathroom project replace drywall or patch, sand and paint

Bathroom project replace drywall or patch, sand and paint

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  #1  
Old 04-15-19, 11:39 AM
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Bathroom project replace drywall or patch, sand and paint

Hello everyone,
Long time lurker at the forum. Have fixed a lot of little things over the past couple of years with the posts I've read here. Thanks for that. However, this is my first big project..well, big for me anyway. So, here goes...yes, it's another bathroom question.

House is only 18 years old (one owner, us) but we had some paint issues crop up on us in our bathroom. I let it go too long, with finances being what they are and my timidness to tackle this. But, armed with my newly minted paint scraper, I went to work.

Pictures below, but here is what happened. I scraped the paint that was peeling off, but it went a lot higher than I thought. I kept peeling. I'm pretty sure I took a layer of paper off the drywall. Ok, ok...here is the question(s).

1. Do I continue with what I have started? My plan is to use joint compound to fill in the gaps and then tape as normal, bringing tape all the way down to the top of the shower (like it was when I started). Then once the taping is done, primer the heck out of it with a good primer (KILZ?) and then texture (from a can) and paint with a good bathroom paint and of course caulk. I think I am on the right track here, just dont know about the inner corners other than hard work and elbow grease.

2. Or, do I somehow cut drywall out and replace? I really don't want to cut out all four surfaces out to the corner and have to deal with that. I was wondering if I could cut half way and just butt join the new boards?

I'm facing a huge issue right now getting the inner corners cleaned out so that I can retape and have 6-8" to feather out. Have I taken the back surface too far down by removing the paper? Thereby making the choice for me? Can I just replace that sides and the back? I'd love to hear some suggestions.

Thanks for reading my long post. I'm looking forward to hearing back! I also have higer detailed photos if needed.
 
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05-23-19, 09:57 AM
NWHikerOR
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Smile

Hi Everyone,
I just wanted to show you the finished pics. Sorry for the delay, but life got in the way! Anyway, I finished this weekend and here is the result. I painted the walls a new color as well. I took this picture right before I dropped the doors back in.

Couple of things I learned. Know how a caulking gun works BEFORE you attempt to use it. Don't assume unless you want all the caulk coming out the back. Same goes for texture-in-a-can. Glad I practiced on the left over green-board. Not perfect, but certainly not bad. I think it looks pretty good for a first timer. Lastly, don't skimp on the paint brushes. Get the best you can.

THANK YOU TO ALL THAT HELPED!!

PIlotDane, MarkSr and XSleeper, I truly could not have done this without your guidance. Thank you again so much for helping. I posted some finish pics. Overall, I've never even attempted something like this and with your help, I think it came out pretty darn good. Thanks again!
 
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Old 04-15-19, 11:49 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd be inclined to cut out and discard where there is mold. The rest can be patched or replaced. Any exposed gypsum [missing paper] needs to be coated with either Zinnser's Gardz or an oil base primer before you apply joint compound or latex primer or paint.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 11:56 AM
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Hi marksr,
First, thanks for replying and also, thanks for the other posts you made over the years. I've learned a thing or two from your posts!!

Ok, I like the idea of cutting and replacing as well. One, I think its a better way to go and two, I think it will require less work. My question then is, do I cut the drywall in between studs or on the stud? The ceiling is going to be a no-brainer since the beams will run perpendicular, but hte walls I am not sure.

I am thinking of replace the whole backside, and half of the ceiling and walls? Then I can tape, etc
It seems like doing those inner corners is just a pain, whereas I can eliminate a little bit of work but cutting it out.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 11:59 AM
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Cut the sheetrock down the center of the studs. You want to leave half the stud (3/4") to support the edge of one piece of sheetrock and the other half of the stud supports the sheetrock butting up to it. If you screw-up and cut beside the stud I just screw a scrap of 2x4 to the side of the stud to provide something to mount to.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 12:02 PM
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Thanks Dane!! I have a stud finder, but they should be 16" on center right from the inner corner correct?
 
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Old 04-15-19, 12:19 PM
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Most are on 16" centers but some builders use 24" centers ..... and then there is the odd wall with a strange layout.

I find it easier to cut the drywall along side of a stud and then add a nailer next to it to attach the new piece of drywall to.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 06:49 PM
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Butting up against existing walls

Ok, got the new drywall in, but my question is this. Do I just tape and mud over the the joint or should I sand away or remove the paint that is currently on the remaining wall?

all the patching posts I see just tape over the joint onto previously painted wall section and then feather out. Is this correct?
 
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Old 04-17-19, 06:51 PM
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Yes that is correct. No sanding required.

If you have any sort of gap between the new drywall and old you will want to fill that gap with mud (wipe it down tight) and let it dry before you tape. That sort of thing will make your tape pucker out otherwise.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 07:03 PM
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Sweet!!! I might have been making this harder than it seems.

so, I fill the gap if needed, tape, mud over tape, let dry, then mud again and start feathering...correct?

Sorry for silly question but dont want huge bulge in wall or miss a step.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 07:17 PM
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Fill any gaps around/between sheets, let it dry.

​​​Thin your joint compound slightly, bed tape in mud, wipe down tight, let dry. You don't leave a lot of mud on the wall on this step.

Mud again, barely covering tape with mud... using a wide knife. Let dry.

Mud again... focus on smoothing / filling up the previous coat and feathering the edges out a little farther.

Skim coat, to try to clean up anything that isn't smooth. Let dry.

Sand, but don't sand so agressively that you sand into your tape! Use a bright light to shine on the walls so you can see everything. Circle and repair (skim) any imperfections you find... then lightly sand those repairs.

Prime the walls. Lightly sand the walls before painting.

There are likely tons of YouTube videos on this if it helps . Remember that putting on multiple THIN coats is far better than thick coats and LOTS of sanding.

A fan in the room will greatly speed up your dry times.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 09:20 PM
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Thumbs on the YouTube. Been watching for weeks. Plus, the help on this site is really amazing!!

Thank you thank you thank you to everyone for all help so far! I couldnt have even started without you!!
 

Last edited by NWHikerOR; 04-17-19 at 11:54 PM.
  #12  
Old 04-18-19, 02:26 AM
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It's not uncommon for a few defects to go unnoticed until you prime. Pay special attention while the primer is wet and shiny. If you see any bad spots, remember where they are and go back to fix them once the primer is dry.
 
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Old 04-18-19, 10:18 AM
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So, I thought I would post some pictures of the progress.I took MarkSr's advice and removed the old drywall and used a nailer. I have to redo the side panel tonight because I didn't get the nailer flush and have this 1/4" edge.

Lesson learned - put your nailers in first, before you start inserting drywall. That way, you'll have just a bit more room to drive your screws for the nailers.Also, drywall breaks very easily when cutting. You can actually man-handle it a little bit...but don't go to far!!

Anyway, I'll keep adding pics as it goes...tonight = mudding the seams with advice from XSleeper!
 
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Old 05-23-19, 09:57 AM
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Smile

Hi Everyone,
I just wanted to show you the finished pics. Sorry for the delay, but life got in the way! Anyway, I finished this weekend and here is the result. I painted the walls a new color as well. I took this picture right before I dropped the doors back in.

Couple of things I learned. Know how a caulking gun works BEFORE you attempt to use it. Don't assume unless you want all the caulk coming out the back. Same goes for texture-in-a-can. Glad I practiced on the left over green-board. Not perfect, but certainly not bad. I think it looks pretty good for a first timer. Lastly, don't skimp on the paint brushes. Get the best you can.

THANK YOU TO ALL THAT HELPED!!

PIlotDane, MarkSr and XSleeper, I truly could not have done this without your guidance. Thank you again so much for helping. I posted some finish pics. Overall, I've never even attempted something like this and with your help, I think it came out pretty darn good. Thanks again!
 
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marksr, XSleeper voted this post useful.
  #15  
Old 05-23-19, 10:24 AM
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Nice job - mudding and taping drywall is something of an art and it always looks worse before it looks better (at least for me!)

Feels awesome, doesn't it? Plus, think of the money you saved by DIYing it.
 
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Old 05-23-19, 10:51 AM
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Yeah...my wife was giving me a hard time because I kept walking in there every 10 minutes marveling at my work. Total cost of the project was about $200, give or take. Would have been much more spendy without this site.
 
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