Drywall crack around tub

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  #1  
Old 06-21-19, 07:25 AM
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Drywall crack around tub

Hi All,

Tenant is moving out and during walk-through found this situation in bathroom around the tub.
As you can see in the picture, the crack is along both the side and top of the bathtub. I applied some pressure to the drywall on the left side of the curtain rod, and it can be pushed in a bit.

I think it was because the exhaust fan not being used during showers and tenant said that the fan was not used during showers.

Anyways, what are my options to fix this, any potential issues I should check that might be caused by this?

I have only patched holes on drywall, so my experience is rather limited in this aspect.

Thanks in advance!

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  #2  
Old 06-21-19, 07:49 AM
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I'm sure you would like to be able to blame the tenant but that is just a crappy tub install and drywall job to blame. The tenant is not to blame at ALL for this.
 
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  #3  
Old 06-21-19, 08:24 AM
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Good to know.
But the original question still remains
 
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Old 06-21-19, 08:33 AM
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The issues are, is the surround flange securely fastenened so that it cannot flex and break the drywall? Is the flange covered by 1/2" of drywall? (or was the rough opening the wrong size... and the drywall or mud that is over the flange so thin that it couldn't possibly hold up) Was durabond (moisture resistant and harder than joint compound) and tape used to finish the perimeter of the flange? And is there solid 2x4 framing behind the flange so that it has something to fasten to?

I suspect the answer to all the above is no.
 
  #5  
Old 06-21-19, 08:43 AM
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I do appreciate the insight. Being this is a new home construction finished in 2012, I have no idea the answers to all of the above questions.

I am just a homeowner trying to see what are my options to address this issue...
​​​​​​
I was hoping this won't be a big deal but guess not? Are you suggesting that we tear the drywall down to check and address all the above mentioned points? Or, is there some middle ground here that we could get this fixed in a reasonable way without too much resources spent?


Thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 06-21-19, 09:03 AM
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Its hard to answer without being there to look at it in person. I really think the rough opening was probably too big which is why there was barely any mud covering the flange in the first place. If it was my house I would probably remove the drywall left of the tub to the next stud or two over... and cut about 3" down from the ceiling and remove all the drywall above the tub surround... at least on the side its cracked.

That will open up the wall enough for you to see if there is sufficient framing (If not add it) and then redrill holes in the flange and install stainless truss head screws every 12" or so. The flange HAS to be solid. Then the mud needs to be thicker over the flange. So you may want to shim the outside perimeter of the flange before you replace the sheetrock so that the drywall flares out slightly where it meets the flange. This will allow you to mud over the flange with at least 1/4" of durabond and tape.
 
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Old 06-21-19, 09:15 AM
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Sounds like it's not going to be a diy job for me

To help clarify, I attached a picture with markings. If I push on the red part, the drywall can be pushed in a bit. The blue part close to the tub was not moving at all.
Maybe a stupid question, is the flange sort of like a "lip" that goes around the tub and that is underneath the blue part?
 
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Old 06-21-19, 09:42 AM
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Yes, the flange is a lip... a nailing flange for the tub. It's supposed to be securely fastened to the framing. The drywall is also not supposed to be able to flex at all. Any movement in either will crack the drywall. Drywall cracks when it isn't secured to the framing sufficiently. And your drywall probably isn't fastened well because there isn't enough framing to prevent it from moving.

If someone patches it the way it is, it may look better but it won't last long.
 
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Old 06-21-19, 09:45 AM
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If the tub is secure, you could get some wood or pvc trim (casement or similar type of molding) and nail/glue it around the tub surround. It's not the 'right' fix, but it's a heck of a lot easier!
 
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Old 06-21-19, 10:51 AM
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So... if the tub is secure, which it seems is, then the other portion of the drywall isn't secure enough which caused this to happen?
 
  #11  
Old 06-22-19, 03:08 AM
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I'd probably skim a coat of Durabond over it and hope for the best. If that fails then I'd look into removing drywall and starting over. That is assuming when you press against the drywall it doesn't give.
 
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