1957 Plaster Repair options

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Old 10-02-20, 09:48 AM
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1957 Plaster Repair options

Hi! I hope you all can give me some advice. We had a roof leak which ruined the interior ceiling and wall of plaster in our house, built 1957. It has plaster walls and ceiling. The brown coat is intact but a good portion of the plaster came off. I tried to cut it more square to maybe put on drywall but the damage being only plaster is 1/8 to max 1/4in thick. I'm thinking I just slap some plaster on there? The wall damage is approx. 12in x 25in and the ceiling is the same 12in x 25in. I bought plaster of paris but now I'm second guessing that I should use that. I saw a previous post about an exterior wall but that one seem to have a lot of damage and the brown coat also needed replacing. Durabond comes in a 45 set time but its a 25lb bag which seems like alot. I assume I need to use drywall tape for the corner transition from the wall to the ceiling? Thanks in advance.




 

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10-03-20, 04:16 PM
tightcoat
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What he said. In my market real Durabond is only common in 90 minute. EasySand and its competitors are available iin 5, 20, 45, and 90 minute set times . You can use either Durabond or EasySand or the like. If you use Druabond make sure you don't leave any high spots that you will want to sand off. It just gets too hard to sand. The others are not quite s hard. You can always add more material to fill in a low spot easier than you can sand off a high spot.
 
  #2  
Old 10-02-20, 01:00 PM
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See tightcoat's reply in this recent thread.

Scroll to the end.

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/p...ing-spots.html
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-20, 03:05 PM
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Thanks XSLEEPER for the plug. What I say n the post X linked to is good. Do not add sand. At least it looks like your finish is smooth so you want to use smooth mud.
Don't try to use that PoP. It will set before you can get it slicked down.
It looks like maybe you have more scraping to do. It also looks like when you are finished with the repair you should prime with an oil base primer to kill any water stains that you might have. I don't suppose it would hurt to tape the angle. The way it was plastered it should not be strictly necessary.
I guess the only other advice I would add is try to finish the angle both sides at the same time. The plasterer used a tool called an angle float or angle block. You can get a corner tool in the drywall tools section of most any store that has drywall tools that will do fine.
Keep the edges of the old work clean, keep the tools clean and lubricated with water. As your material sets use water from a spray bottle to mist it as you slick it down.
Maybe you will want to put a last coat of ordinary joint compound over the repair. It is OK to lap this onto the old work, keep the lapped edge as thin as possible then when it is thoroughly dry sand that joint down to nothing, prime as I said before and paint.


 
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Old 10-03-20, 12:12 PM
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I noticed in the other post you mentioned using Durabond 90. Would you recommend that over Durabond 45? I'll save the Plaster of Paris for art projects with the kids.
 
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Old 10-03-20, 01:47 PM
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90 takes longer than 45 to set so it might be more novice friendly. I'm partial to their 20 minute mud.
 
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  #6  
Old 10-03-20, 04:16 PM
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What he said. In my market real Durabond is only common in 90 minute. EasySand and its competitors are available iin 5, 20, 45, and 90 minute set times . You can use either Durabond or EasySand or the like. If you use Druabond make sure you don't leave any high spots that you will want to sand off. It just gets too hard to sand. The others are not quite s hard. You can always add more material to fill in a low spot easier than you can sand off a high spot.
 
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Old 10-03-20, 05:59 PM
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It seems, in my area I can only buy Durabond in packages of 60. I have Quick Set Lite available though in a 90min. form so I guess I'll go with that. Thank you for your help. I'll post later how it went.
 
 

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