Joint compound on hardibacker


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Old 04-11-21, 04:15 PM
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Joint compound on hardibacker

I am thinking of using Hardibacker cement board on the walls of a small bathroom which has a separate bathtub and shower. Most of the walls will be covered with Hardibacker and tiles and small sections of wall will be painted. Would it be possible to just cover all the walls with Hardibacker and after tiling, skim coating the un-tiled sections with joint compound? I figure this would do away with trying to make joints between Hardibacker and gypsum board -- I wouldn't have to adjust for the 1/16" thickness difference between Hardibacker and gypsum board. Also, If I decide to tile larger or smaller areas as I'm doing work I would not be limited by where I placed Backerboard and gypsum board. There would be no gypsum board where water contact was possible.

Thank you.
 
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Old 04-11-21, 05:26 PM
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Unless I'm not understanding you at all, you only need hardibacker in the wet location (in the shower area) so it would be a real waste of time to put it everywhere in the bathroom. The difference in thickness is a non issue once you tape the transition.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 12:13 PM
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Than you XSleeper;

I'm tiling around the bathtub also to the ceiling. And around the rest of the bathroom to a height of about 4'. That leaves not much area that is not tiled and so I was wondering if I could just do the whole thing in Hardibacker and skim coat the small areas that are not tiled.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 02:55 PM
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You may also want to look at bull nose tile, to include quarter bull nose and half bull nose. These may provide the transition you are looking for.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 03:36 PM
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Anything around a combination tub/shower should be hardibacker. Everything else can be floor to ceiling moisture resistant drywall. Any bump at a seam gets mudded and you will never know it's there. On the stand-alone tub walls you "could" put hardibacker on the lower 48" but are you really going to be splashing water on the walls around a stand-alone tub?
 
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  #6  
Old 04-13-21, 10:50 AM
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I always install my cement board (I personally dislike Hardibacker to install) to extend out of the shower a few inches. Then the tile finishes wherever makes sense, and then I use drywall compound and tape to fill the hole and skim the cement board up to the end of the tile (or transition piece). So no issue with skimming part of the Hardibacker.

I wouldn't do the whole bathroom in it as it's way overkill.

Lastly, I make sure the transition between the cement board and MR drywall is at least 2" away from the edge of the tile to eliminate the possibility of cracking along that joint.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 11:30 AM
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Thank you for the advice. I'm also glad to know that there is no problem with some joint compound overlapping on cement board.
 
 

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