Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Patching and Plastering
Reload this Page >

I have a kitchen wall with openings to access the chimney. What should I do?

I have a kitchen wall with openings to access the chimney. What should I do?


  #1  
Old 09-26-22, 08:58 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 242
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I have a kitchen wall with openings to access the chimney. What should I do?

House if from 1913. In the kitchen there is a brick wall covered in plaster with 2 openings. I think, one is for a circular 6.5" stove pipe. The other 12"x9" was some sort of air intake covered by a metal grille with louvers that open and close. I believe the chimney has metal liners going to the basement gas devices. I hope this is the right forum to post this.

1) Is there any reason for me to maintain access to these openings?
2) How should I close them up. I am thinking stuffing rock wool into them and then maybe cement board caulked around the edges. Filling the rectangular one with brick and cement is also possible.

Located in kitchen. Brick chimney wall with plaster over it. Circular stove pipe and what I think was a rectangular air intake.
 
  #2  
Old 09-26-22, 10:37 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,337
Received 1,628 Likes on 1,461 Posts
First, you need to verify how your furnace is vented. If there is a metallic flue lining for the furnace and nothing else is using the chimney you could seal up the unused openings. You can mortar over the openings and include some bricks to help fill the space. This would allow you to do a smooth/flush finish to make the openings disappear.
 
The following users liked this post:
  #3  
Old 09-26-22, 11:55 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: California
Posts: 2,079
Received 34 Likes on 28 Posts
A couple observations and questions. Is there a wall between where the rectangular opening and the round opening are? In the past it seems possibly deadly to have a flue and an intake in the same chimney.
I think it would be worth the price of a real inspection to make sure the furnace is properly vented.

To close up the holes do as Pilot Dane suggests. lay some bricks and mortar in and keep it all recessed enough that you can then plaster it flush. Your masonry work does not have to be pretty. If you have questions about how to plaster it to match we can help you.
Clean up the soot before you begin.
 
The following users liked this post:
  #4  
Old 09-26-22, 01:11 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 242
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
"Is there a wall between where the rectangular opening and the round opening are?"

To me it appears the chimney cross section is a hollow brick rectangle. The rectangular opening had a louvered grate and after turning to the right I can see into the empty body of the chimney. I can see the brickwork inside the chimney.

The circular opening is a ceramic pipe that also turns right. I cannot see where it goes after turning right.

In the late 1980s a metal lining was installed for the active openings, and code compliance, in the basement for the furnace and hot water heater. I do not know what the status of the circular opening in the kitchen is except that is has been blocked off with a cover you can see hanging.
 
  #5  
Old 10-01-22, 09:06 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 242
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you for your responses.

I have vacuumed the openings, do I need to do more? Should I wash down inside the vent openings? There may be some oily deposits on the inside.

I plan to buy mortar and bricks from Home Depot. Is there a specific product you would recommend? Is there a difference between mortar and cement for this purpose?

Should I brick up the entire space, or should I just brick up the 2 openings on each vent and fill the interior with rock wool?
 
  #6  
Old 10-01-22, 09:32 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,337
Received 1,628 Likes on 1,461 Posts
Cement (Portland cement) is an ingredient, not a end product that you use. Cement is the "stuff" that makes concrete, mortar and thinset harden.

For your repair I would get type N mortar mix. Make sure you get the kind that includes sand and all you have to do is add water. This is much more convenient than buying mortar and sand and making your own blend. I would also get a half dozen bricks.

Before doing the work I would thoroughly clean the outer 4" of the openings. I'd use a wire brush or steel wool and give it a good scrubbing to remove the accumulated soot and dirt so the mortar can stick to ac lean surface.

You can shove insulation into the cavity before sealing it up if you want. But, the top of the chimney must be sealed first. You don't want water or rodents coming down the chimney and soaking the insulation. I don't insulate because of the chance of it holding moisture and hosting vermin plus nothing in the chimney is insulated so there would be a very, very small gain in energy efficiency.
 
The following users liked this post:
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: