Dog trouble


  #1  
Old 12-12-04, 03:05 PM
stevenardigo
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Dog trouble

We have a wonderfully behaved 50lb lab mix that we adopted 1.5 years ago. Over the course of his life with us he has become increasingly more freaked out about having his nails trimmed. It culminated today with him biting the groomer (thankfully, no serious injury) on the hand. what can we do to prevent future incidents???
 
  #2  
Old 12-12-04, 05:29 PM
T
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Trimming dog's nails

Get your dog used to the idea of having his feet handled. When he's snuggled up with you on the couch, massage his paws. Let him get used to the idea that feet can be handled without trimming. Get a pair of nail clippers and keep them in plain site so that the dog gets used to the idea of seeing them and does not have to associate fear at the sight of them. Teaching your dog to shake hands is another way to get him used to having his feet touched. Always give a reward when he shakes hands so he will associate a reward with having his feet touched. Cut one nail a day and give a treat. In matter of a few days, you can get them all cut. Always start with the back feet because dog's seem to get more stressed out over having their front nails trimmed. Keep clippers sharp. Stay calm and talk in soft tones so that the dog gets used to the idea that you are helping him. Try different positions until you find one that works--dog lying on lap, dog in bath, dog standing, etc. If you happen to cut too deep, apologize in a calm, sympathetic tone and apply Kwik Stop or other product to stop bleeding. It's always best to begin getting your dog used to the idea of nail trimming when it is a pup, but older dogs can be trained, too, with patience. Trimming your dog's nails at home where he feels secure may be more effective than at the groomer's where he may already be stressed out about having to go because he associates pain and fear with the visit.
 
  #3  
Old 01-17-05, 04:58 PM
bigp
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Talking

Twelvepole got it perfect. You're going to have to become a foot fanatic. Every day play with your dog, but take some time holding and grooming their feet. All it really takes is time. Good luck.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-18-05 at 04:06 AM. Reason: NO ADVERTISING IN SIGNATURES; NO LINKS
  #4  
Old 01-22-05, 09:11 AM
R
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Nail clipping

Hi-
Also be mindful of the pressure that you are putting on the dog's toe when you are holding it for cutting. Sometimes it's not that the clippers hurt, but that your other hand has the toe in a vice grip to hold it steady, and that pinches! Perhaps the groomer did that. Remember to examine each nail closely before you cut it. Sometimes dogs crack or split the nail, or injure the nail bed. Nail injuries aren't serious, but they can be painful and may cause a dog to snap when his paw is handled.

As an alternative, you may want to consider investing in a good nail file and doing your dog's nails that way. It does take longer, but you don't have to worry about accidentally cutting into the quick. Don't forget to give lots and lots of treats while you do it!
 
  #5  
Old 01-26-05, 09:23 AM
Onnendu
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One thing you might want to try is a small, cordless Dremel grinder with a medium-coarse sanding drum. My greyhound has hard nails and the pressure required to cut through the nail makes her yelp but the grinder is quick and painless (just a bit of vibration that you can desensitize them to - one nail at a time and lots of treats!).

On the plus side, if you grind too far, the rotation of the drum will actually help cauterize the quick.

One thing to watch out for (although I think you have a Lab so it shouldn't be a problem) is any long toe hair - try to hold it out of the way or trim it first so it doesn't wind on the grinder (one or two hairs may get pulled out which isn't a BIG deal but you certainly don't want that to happen to a big chunk of hair!)

My other 4 dogs don't have a problem with the grinder either and I use it to smooth rough edges after cutting.

Onnendu
 
  #6  
Old 01-26-05, 10:13 AM
B
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My wife uses a Dremmel tool on nails occaisionally. To keep from winding hair into the tool (which REALLY disappoints our dogs ), she pokes the nail through an old nylon stocking. Works really slick!

Bruce
 
  #7  
Old 02-06-05, 10:37 AM
Dianna
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Cool

Originally Posted by Bruce H
My wife uses a Dremmel tool on nails occaisionally. To keep from winding hair into the tool (which REALLY disappoints our dogs ), she pokes the nail through an old nylon stocking. Works really slick!

Bruce

What a clever trick!
 
 

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