whats the best way to keep a dog from barking outside?

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Old 02-22-05, 11:12 AM
T
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whats the best way to keep a dog from barking outside?

We have a 10 and half year old chow chow pure and she is the nicest dog in every way, except for one thing that drives us nuts. She loves to go outside during the day, and she always woofing and barking at the neighbours , or a pedestrian, or cats she notices.,
Can't keep her inside all the time , because she scratches and goes nuts to go outside. I sometimes wish there was an animal Ritalin product to keep her quiet. I occasionally take her for a walk or car ride, but that isn't feasible at other times of the day 8 to 6 .. I was thinking of a muzzle., would that keep her quiet?
You would think a ten.5 year old dog ( mid 70's in human years) would just want to sleep all day, but she only sleeps from 10 pm to 6 am/8 am.
 
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Old 02-22-05, 02:12 PM
SJ702
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Hi Ttodd,
Could your Chow be bored? Have you provided toys for her to play with? The large treat balls are good for giving you dog a 'job'/task, as she tries to get the treats out of the ball. Many dogs especialy the working, hearding or sport breeds need busy work to keep them out of trouble.

Here is an article from the SPCA that may be of some help...
http://www.sspca.org/Dogs_BarkingDog.html

 
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Old 02-22-05, 02:38 PM
T
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No she's not bored just doing her job of protecting and warning us of danger nearby..
of course the danger is just people who belong in the neighborhood.

Her bark is a woof woof woof type of sound that drives us batty.

we live in a townhouse developement and want to keep the peace during the day.
 
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Old 02-22-05, 02:52 PM
SJ702
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Well the above mentioned article covers that too...

Territorial/Protective Behavior

Your dog may be barking to guard his territory if:

*The barking occurs in the presence of "intruders," which may include the mail carrier, children walking to school and other dogs or neighbors in adjacent yards.

*Your dog's posture while he's barking appears threatening -- tail held high and ears up and forward.

*You've encouraged your dog to be responsive to people and noises outside.

Recommendations:

*Teach your dog a "quiet" command. When he begins to bark at a passer-by, allow two or three barks, then say "quiet" and interrupt his barking by shaking a can filled with pennies or squirting water at his mouth with a spray bottle or squirt gun. This will cause him to stop barking momentarily. While he's quiet, say "good quiet" and pop a tasty treat into his mouth. Remember, the loud noise or squirt isn't meant to punish him, rather it's to startle him into being quiet so you can reward him. If your dog is frightened by the noise or squirt bottle, find an alternative method of interrupting his barking (throw a toy or ball toward him).

*Desensitize your dog to the stimulus that triggers the barking. Teach him that the people he views as intruders are actually friends and that good things happen to him when these people are around. Ask someone to walk by your yard, starting far enough away so that your dog isn't barking, then reward him for quiet behavior as he obeys a "sit" or "down" command. Use a very special food reward such as little pieces of cheese or meat. As the person gradually comes closer, continue to reward his quiet behavior. It may take several sessions before the person can come close without your dog barking. When the person can come very close without your dog barking, have them feed him a treat or throw a toy for him.

*If your dog barks while inside the house when you're home, call him to you, have him obey a command, such as "sit" or "down," and reward him with praise and a treat.

*Don't inadvertently encourage this type of barking by enticing your dog to bark at things he hears or sees outside.

You may want to contact your vet or a behavorist/trainer if this is becoming a problem for the neighborhood.
 
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Old 02-24-05, 05:50 PM
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Then again, instead of teaching your dog that it is ok for a stranger to walk up and give them a treat, and they will be subsequently quiet and non-protective of your and his property, you could try training with a bark collar.

It gives a mild electric shock when the dog barks, and can be used to teach dogs when it is ok to bark, and when it is not.

Dogs can be the best burglar alarm system ever invented, unless we teach them that there is never an alarm condition.
 
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Old 03-03-05, 08:43 AM
mooreisbetter
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Talking

Try a bark/shock collar, you will have to shave the hair on the under side of the neck so the prongs will touch the dogs skin since it is a chow. It didn't work on my pit bull he just got used to the shock and wore the batteries out....it might work if your dog is not so stubborn!
 
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