Neighbors Dog Hates Me

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  #1  
Old 10-21-05, 06:36 PM
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Neighbors Dog Hates Me

My neighbor just purchased a border collie puppy. I have tried to be nice to the dog since she started living next door. I give him pieces of meat and other treats. When the dog is outside by herself and I am doing something the dog watches me constantly. When I move something large which she can see, she barks constantly and growls at me as if I was stealing something from her yard. I took the garbage cans to the curb on monday and the dog went nuts, barking and growling at me. I don't know what I have to do to make the puppy stop barking at me. My neighbors and my yard have a fence inbetween. My neighbors had a border collie before but she died about a month ago. The border collie that died did the same thing and I was accused of teasing her. What can I do to make the dog stop barking at me?
 
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Old 10-22-05, 07:10 AM
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You might try one of these products:

http://www.countrysidepet.com/level.itml/icOid/1964
http://www.opamerica.com/product_inf...oducts_id/1774
http://www.tbotech.com/dogchaser.htm

or stop by your local pet supermarket (Pet Smart, Etc.) and see what they have and/or recommend.
 
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Old 10-22-05, 08:30 AM
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My suggestion is to talk to your neighbors and see if they will let you come over and really get to know the pup. I would not be giving meat as treats to the puppy without their permission. Personally I poison trained my dogs so that they would not take food from anyone but myself and a few select other people, and always (except with me personally) only out of their own food bowl.

As for the large item barking issue...border collies are herding dogs and see things as their property oftentimes. She may be thinking you are doing something with one of her *flock* and that is what is causing her agitation.

Talk to the neighbors about your concerns and see if you can't all get together to get to know each other better. Knowing the dog well enough to have her identify you as ok will be the best bet at solving the problem.

Keep us posted.
 
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Old 10-24-05, 10:32 AM
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The problem is not you it is the breed of dog. My wife grew up with a Border who was the same way until he died. Borders have very good personalities but they are herding dogs. The like to have everything in order. When the dog sees you outside, especially moving things around, you are throwing off her "order".

I'd try talking with your neighbor and visiting the dog on a regular basis (when the owner is there) so hopefully the dog will get used to you. That should hopefully help.
 
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Old 11-03-05, 08:58 PM
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border collie

If the suggestions above don't work for you, try this:
When the dog is quiet, start from your door (or down the block, or across the city) and sit still for a few minutes. Once you think the dog has noticed you, but isn't barking, move a couple steps closer. Repeat this procedure VERY slowly, backing up any time the dog gets agitated. Do this for as long/as often as you can, each time getting closer and closer. Once you actually get to the fence, then it's time to start over again. Start back a bit, and toss a ball, or do something similarily mildly active. Just gently throw it up and catch it. If he starts barking, stop immediately, and back up again. Get closer and closer again, until you're at the fence. Repeat with more and mroe activity, such as doing jumping jacks, tapping on a pot with a spoon, etc. Anything you can think of, until you can basically do anything near the fence without the dog reacting. Then do some of the stuff in the dark, when its raining, etc, to acclimatize the dog to different situations. Finally, make sure the dog has adequate shelter. Border Collies, depending on where you live, are not designed to live outdoors, and need a sturdy, warm dog house, as well as proper food and water to survive.
Courtenay
 
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Old 12-12-05, 06:09 AM
bleulune
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maybe you should visit your neighbor more often,and then his dog would be more kind to you?!
i mean!!dogs are often unfriendly with strangers,partly becauce of their protection instinct.as long as you contact with them more often,they will be friendly with you.this is according to my personal experience.
 

Last edited by bleulune; 12-16-05 at 12:43 AM.
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Old 12-16-05, 01:44 PM
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My dogs are like that,, A. Sheperd and B. Collie. I have even tried to give the neighbors little dog treats to give them.. they are just extremely protective.. they dont care who you are 9 or 90. Same way in the back of the truck. But people can come in yard through the house and everything is fine as long as they dont try and pet them right off the bat.
 
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Old 12-18-05, 07:27 AM
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Looks like you've gotten a lot of good advice here. My rough collies are much the same with barking at strangers--even friends who move their stuff or rearrange their world.

You don't mention whether or not your neighbor is doing any formal training with this pup, but I think that would help a lot. I used to show dogs in obedience and even though the 2 I have now are not in competitive obedience they have attended classes for most of their 5 years. It also helps to have refresher runs in the back yard. Unfortunately this is something the owner needs to address.

Does the owner make an appearance when the dog goes off? If not, it's a lost opportunity to teach the dog some manners--regardless of breed and instinct even a herding dog can be taught some control in situations like those you mention.
 
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Old 12-18-05, 02:13 PM
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reply to "digby1"

I tried what everyone said to try but found the the idea that "hd_sheena" suggested worked best. Now the dog runs the other way when I get near her. She tries to get into the house where she lives when the door is closed. So far everything is working great. I hope it keeps up. My neighbors are the kind of neighbors who like dogs but wouldn't spend any money on for any kind of training, so I had to figure something out. I will see how thing go this summer when the dog is out more.
Phil
 
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Old 01-26-06, 06:15 AM
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Glad you found a solution that is working.
 
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Old 01-26-06, 06:41 AM
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solution

hd_sheena came up with the solution that worked best. He talkes about it in item #5. The only time the dog barks at me now is when its master is outside at the same time. Otherwise the dog runs from me.

Phil
 
 

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