skinny pointer

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  #1  
Old 02-13-06, 10:09 AM
Cathy
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skinny pointer

I purchased a pointer that is a puppy from the humane society in the area. He is so scared and skinny. I've had him a couple days and he now has diarrea. So potty trainning him pretty hard. I also have a lab mix that is about 7 months old. Their first meet was less than happy. What do I do about his diarrea? Also how do I make the two dogs next meet better? If you can help and please excuse the misspelled word. Thank You.
 
  #2  
Old 02-13-06, 01:50 PM
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first the diahrea, it will take time for his system to settle down emotionally and physically. get him on the same food as your other dog (should still be a puppy formula) and give him time to get used to it. have him checked for parasites. your other dog is enforcing his dominant status in the home. it's normal. let the older dog know you're not going to tolerate the behavior, and don't force a friendship. they should both have seperate food and water dishes and be fed with some distance between them. both should have seperate places to sleep. avoid any competition for your attention other than playing together. the younger one will have to submit or become the alpha male and there's not much you can do to stop it.
 
  #3  
Old 02-13-06, 02:11 PM
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At least one of the dogs is insecure and that is not the time to introduce a new dog. Keep them away from each other until they've both become somewhat comfortable in their surroundings.
 
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Old 02-14-06, 01:44 PM
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The puppy might be having diarrhea because of a change in diet, a different water supply, because it is stressed out, or it might be a health issue.

Like someone else said, a trip to the vet should be taken to make sure it's not a health issue.

As far as the dgs meeting, you might want to put the litte one in a crate or set up a gate and let them meet through a gate so they feel a bit more comfortable with each other.
 
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Old 02-14-06, 02:23 PM
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I agree that the puppy probably has mental issues to get over. New home, food, and another dog to contend with.
Shelters usually have a Vet check out the animals they have for various reasons.
My Siberian Husky came from a shelter and the diarrea was a problem from day one. Our Vet said to try a non-soy food. It worked rather quickly. Glad I found a brand at Kroger store that was a little less expensive than Iams. My outside dog (Husky/Malmute mix) eats anything, including his dog house, with no problems. I now have a "drop-off puppy" that also eats anything I put in front of him. He looks to be full blooded Black Lab. Web feet and all.
A Vet visit could solve most of your problems and is highly advised.
 
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Old 02-14-06, 03:27 PM
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i've raised and cared for more than my share of animals and found one constant. cheap dog food is not worth any savings at all. not even if it's free. high vegatable content is bad. i know the conventional wisdom among high end breeders is to use products like iams and eukanuba, but i've raised enought puppies on those and good ol purina with no obvious difference. clear eyes, shiney coats, healthy weights, and lack of skin problems. i firmly believe all pups should be on a puppy formulation for at least one year. my weimeraners stayed on for two years. when they started to show weight increase the were gradually switched over to an adult formula. my two are litter mates obtained six months apart. some serious fighting with serious vet bills. eventually they sorted it out and are now best friends. btw i do like the crate idea. it shows the older dog that the pup is no threat to his teritory and tells the pup he doesn't have the run of the house. good luck
 
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Old 02-15-06, 05:25 AM
Cathy
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skinny pionter

Thank you for the info on the diarrea. I have another problem. I tried to have the my animals meet. The older puppy wanted to play and layed down next to the new puppy. The new puppy snaps and wanted to fight. The new puppy backs himself into a corner. Scrappy (the older puppy) just wants to play. I think I might have mistake. I understand that it takes time for the puppies to become friends. But, Spanky (the new puppy) doesn't want friends. He snaps and goes after Scrappy anytime he see him. I don't know what to do? Any suggestion.
 
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Old 02-15-06, 05:39 AM
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he probably had to be aggressive in the enviornment he was living in when you got him. on trick i've used is to have his food dish always full. it won't work with every dog, some will just eat till they bust. new toys might also help disolve the terratorial problems.
 
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Old 02-15-06, 02:16 PM
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Train the puppies so that you can control them and prevent these aggressive encounters. Have one sit, then remove it from the area to its crate. Establishing dominance is an activity that will ensue in the fullness of time.
 
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Old 02-16-06, 09:27 AM
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Since I was slow to respond to this thread...and agree mostly with the advice already given I won't add to that part, but, I did have a bit of a suggestion about the diahrea.

You may want to try to find a product at your local pet supply or feed store called Bene-Bac. It is a paste you can give to help return the intestinal flora to a healthy state. Oftentimes when diahrea is present it is due to a lack of this bacteria. Stresses in environment and such can cause this to happen.

It contains a good dose of the bacteria needed to help resolve the issue.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 02-26-06, 08:46 AM
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Just wanted to add...

Putting a large breed dog on an ordinary puppy formula can encourage fast growth, which can lead to many joint and bone problems. My border collie was fed puppy food for 12 months, and had to have an operation for $1200 to fix it. Feed either a large breed puppy formula, or plain old adult food to prevent fast growth.
 
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Old 03-05-06, 01:55 PM
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with puppies I avoid puppy food we go right to adult food with our labs otherwise with all the extra crap and fat in the puppy food, even the large breed foods fillers, they grow too fast and can have health problems with joints. Go for a good average food. we use Purinal One. Little doodles little waste and fed very little compared to others. Iams and Eucanuba(sp) are some of the worst to use. As are the Kibbles and bits/chuncks, and een the cheap store brand is bad stuff. Target though has come up with their own brand that is 100% identical to Purina one for $5 more a bag.

For the Diahrea water and foods do play a roll in it. I have had a rough time with our Brown she explodes if she gets any other unfiltered water away from home. EDITED--VET ADVICE the change in water is usually needed. Even if its a brita filter.

What exactly is going on between the old dog, already at home, and the new pup? Are they all out fighting? is it a growl to keep them away? Who gets food and treats first? attention first? tails up and wagging or are they stiff? who do you think starts it? is it a look or when they are out playing? male/female dogs? fixed? Ages? all needed to point you into a better direction to get them to be pals. I hate to use a crate to train them to like each other. To me a crate is only for use while I am away and for bedtime if you like. We don't use them any other time.

we just went though an introduction with a 2 year old pup we are boarding and it took nearly a week for him to be relaxed and out and for the 6 pack of ours to all relax. neo our oldest (6 yrs old) will growl at the boarded pup when he gets to close or when he is naughty and tried to up his place in the pack. Now nearly 2 weeks later he has been playing with our pack and even relaxed enough to sleep with our 14 week old playing with his ears. For never being around another dog and always crated at home he has done remarkably well. He is a new dog thats for sure.

Hope this all helps you out
 

Last edited by hd_sheena; 03-06-06 at 11:31 AM.
  #13  
Old 03-05-06, 08:40 PM
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I recommend checking with the vet prior to administering medication to your dog for an undiagnosed problem. Diarrhea is often due to changes in food or water or both. A gradual change will help ease this transition. Recall that medicine dosages for adults are usually for humans in the range of 150 to 200 pounds. Since your dog is not likely of the same mass, the medication may be suitable but the dose could cause irreparable harm. Kaopectate contains salicylate (aspirin).
 
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Old 03-05-06, 09:21 PM
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EDITED--VET ADVICE Also for most things if you are keen on watching your pet you will notice what causes the symptoms and can call the vet if need be and be told to withdraw food for 24 hours then introduce rice and boiled burger the next day and in 4 days be back to the food. If that was the case all my crew would get is rice and boiled burger as each gets upset tummy and diahrea every so often. Could be even from the extra yummy we sneek in. It is just like humans. Maybe it was that greasy burger we ate that gives us the runs. Its the same for our four legged friends. Not everything means running to the vet. VET ADVICE--EDITED OUT
If your pocketbook is deep enough to run to the vet for every little thing then by all means do it, but the average person doesn't have that deep of a pocket to dig into every week. It takes common sense sometimes and not a trip to the vet to be told go home and thanks for paying me $60.
 

Last edited by hd_sheena; 03-06-06 at 11:29 AM.
  #15  
Old 03-06-06, 10:05 AM
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Easy guys. Let's reccomend they take the dog to the vet, and leave it at that. I had one of my dogs have a SEVERE reaction to a medication that was "self administered", and nearly lost him. This list is not for recommending medications or veterinary treatment. Let's simply let them know the possible causes for the problem, and recommend a call to a vet. For all we know (being over the internet) this dog could have a myriad of other problems the owner doesn't recognize that would make aspirin VERY harmful. Our pup was on Meloxicam for a joint problem, and when he started vomiting, he was given peptobismol. He then reacted SEVERELY, and to the vet we went. Well... Pepto has an ingredient similar to aspirin, and meloxicam is aspirin-based. mDOes the average person know that? CALL YOUR VET. Thanks guys,
Courtenay
 
  #16  
Old 03-06-06, 11:51 AM
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yes asprin in large doses can and are very harmful as are mixing medications like in humans. Here is what is in the books reguarding asprin. 1 5grain asprin tablet per 30 pounds every 6 hours. and Kayopectate 1 tsp per every 5 pounds every four hours. these amounts of the asprin is safe. Also a side note on the kayopectate about 2 years ago they changed the formulation of it and added the asprin, prior to that there was no asprin in it.
 
 

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