buying thinning shears

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Old 04-20-06, 04:48 PM
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buying thinning shears

I am looking for a pair of thinning shears and don't know what to get. I would like to use it to just thin the hair of a samoyed dog (they have lots of hair). Any suggestions on what I should get. I thought that a pair of thinning shears was a pair of thinning shears but they really can be expensive when you get the better ones. What makes these more expensive that the others and what different types are there. Thank you for your help
 
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Old 04-21-06, 10:24 AM
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Red face

2 suggestions--visit a grooming shop, they normally sell all types of equipment as well and talk to someone there.

I have a set of the skip tooth thinning shears (one balde is smooth and the other has the jagged edge. I se them judiciously for thinning the long haunch hair on my Collies.

#2 Thinning may not be the best way to control Sammy hair--it may just appear to be even thicker as the cut hairs grow in.

If you're trying to get rid of a lot of loose hair, look into an undercoat rake. It can pull a lot of stuff out of the undercoat and make the coat appear much thinner just by reducing the amount of dead stuff that has accumulated in the coat.

I use oneon my dogs once a week and it really controls the 'tumbleweeds' blowing around the house and keeps them from matting up.
 
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Old 04-21-06, 11:19 AM
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Cool

Actually I am trying to thin the hair because hot weather is coming and having all that hair can really make him hot. I know that one can just shave all his hair off but that really does ruin his appearance. I tried shaving a husky one time and said I would NEVER do it again because of how bad she looked. But your mention of a undercoat rake is probably a good idea so know the question is what types of undercoat rakes are there and what is a good one that you would recommend. Thank you
 
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Old 04-22-06, 08:22 AM
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I've tried a couple of different ones. My favorite is one from Master Grooing tools. It has 2 rows of teeth that are powder coated so they don't snag the skin or hair. The handle is rubberized plastic that is ergonamically designed for the human so it is easy to use for extended sessions.

I tried one with rotating teeth, but it just wound the loose hair into mats--requiring scisoors to remove the rake from the backside of a rather unhappy Collie.

Take a look at a company called Pet Edge--they specialize in selling products to professional groomers, but they will sell to anyone. Their website is very extnesive.

(I also think their Customer Service is fantastic.
I bought a bed from them back in November that fell apart when I tried to remove the cushion to wash the cover. They said it wasn't warranteed, but sent me a brand new one free of charge, even the shipping.)
 
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Old 04-22-06, 05:49 PM
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If your samoyed has the double coat as a norweigan elkhound or australian shepherd has, the undercoat rake will make a lot of difference in how much old hair comes out. All of the winter coat should be blown and hence removed by brushing. This should be all the coat removal the dog needs for comfort in the summer. Remember the insulating effect of the coat serves to keep the heat out.
 
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Old 04-29-06, 11:07 PM
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Cool

Ya he has a double coat. What is the best way to remove all this dead hair with the undercoat rack. Is it right after I baith him. Should I blow dry him and at the same time I am blow drying him brush him with the undercoat rack or perhaps it doesn't matter how or when I brush him but anytime is ok weather he is wet or dry. Also does blowing air at the spot I am brushing him help with the removal. The reason why I ask is that this dog is large and his hair is alot. You take those two things and this could take along time to do. Expecially sense I will have to do it quite often during his shedding times. I need a way that is fast. Thanks as always
 
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Old 05-02-06, 01:12 PM
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Will--
Here's the general plan I follow about 3 times a year for the 2 Lollie-Collies in my house.

Bathe with cool water and a mild dog shampoo--soap them up 2 times to make sure you are getting clean to the skin. Then rinse with a white vinegar solution--1 part vinegar to 8 parts water. This strips the leftover shampoo from the coat and skin but does no harm (unless you don't like the smell of pickles!). You can dry at this point or rinse off once more to lessen the vinegar smell.

The vinegar also makes the coat shed water instead of sucking it up and it really loosens up the coat that is shedding out so you can get rid of more of it.

Rub dry w/ a towel--like a beach towel--then blow dry on a cool setting using a pin brush, not the rake. I found the rake tends to tangle in long wet fur and it just makes everyone unhappy.

If you do not have a regular dog dryer a human hair dryer will work, but a lot more slowly. I have seen some folks use a shop vac set to blower, but I have not tried that myself--if you do use a small one-- not a lot of HP.

The dog dryer usually is strong enugh to not only dry the hair but also to 'blast' out the excess water and hair.

It's gonna been a hairy messy job, but if you dry thouroughly I would bet your shedding probelm and grooming needs decrease right away. (Make sure you have plenty of vacuum bags on hand for clean up afterward. you're not going to believe that so much hair came off your dog and somehow, he will look like his coat has doubled...don't worry it's just clean and fluffy cuz you got rid of the dead loose stuff.)

Usually the day after the bath I go through the coat agin with the pin brush and then the rake--then back to our weekly routine of linebrushing with the pin brush and raking to gather up all the loose stuff.

Like I said I do this about 3 times a year-- it's about a 3 or 4 hour job for both mutts at once, but I do get a lot of hair off of them and find a lot less floating or clumping around the house.

I figure investing half a day every three or four months isn't so bad.
 
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Old 06-03-06, 02:53 PM
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Undercoats

'Sammys' are like Akitas in that they only shed their coat twice a year (normally). While Tia's 'blowing coat' she has so much that I find myself raking her every day to keep away the tumbleweeds. I swear I could make another dog out of what I rake off! There's really no easy or quick way to get it all at once. 'digby1' was right - that undercoat is there for a reason, so don't shave.

One hint for use of the undercoat - put it in suet holders in the trees so the birds can use them for their nests!
 
 

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