Warning: Grapes are toxic to dogs

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Old 06-19-06, 08:54 AM
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Warning: Grapes are toxic to dogs

Just getting the word out to all you dog owners so that you don't go through what i went through over a year ago.

my dog ate some chocolate covered raisins (about a whole 16oz can) and upon calling the vet after he vomited, rasins/grapes are MORE toxic than chocolate.

he was rushed to the vet for a 48 our stay w/ IV's and charcole induced vomiting in hopes of PREVENTING acute kidney failure.

if he didn't receive the POISIN CONTROLS recommended treatement, he could possibly (yes possibly) die of acute kidney failure.

so, don't go feeding your dogs grapes or rasins.

for more info go to www.aspca.com and search for the article. a friend of mine had just read this article the same day my dog decided to popen a can of choc/raisins. lucky for me, he called me right as i was cleaning up the vomit and once i told him what happend. he directed me call/take the dog in to the vet.

he's doing fine and no signs of damage at this time.
 
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Old 06-19-06, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by DIYliz
my dog ate some chocolate covered raisins (about a whole 16oz can) and upon calling the vet after he vomited, rasins/grapes are MORE toxic than chocolate.

so, don't go feeding your dogs grapes or rasins.
Or at least don't let them eat a whole POUND of them. You'd probably be sick too. Even coffee/sodas will kill you if you could actually drink that much of it at one time.
 
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Old 06-19-06, 07:10 PM
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I wasn't aware of this. Good to know.
 
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Old 06-20-06, 09:13 AM
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from what i was told, just a few grapes alone are just as toxic.

they are to be treated no different than poisiness berries [shrugs].

none of my dogs will ever be given a single grape/raisin at any given time.

edit: my dogs life is very important to me, just as much as if he were my own blood born child.
if i were told that my child couldn't eat peanuts, he wouldn't get peanuts. same goes for my dog. if my dog is one of the lucky ones that the grapes/raisins isn't harmful to, well I DONT EVER want to find out. plain and simple.

just a word of caution to others who value their pets life.
 
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Old 06-20-06, 09:17 AM
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http://www.aspca.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=16645

(NEW YORK, NY) July 6, 2004 -- The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center continues to caution dog owners that raisins and grapes may be toxic to some dogs.From April 2003 to April 2004, the Center managed 140 cases, each involving one or more dogs that ingested varying amounts of raisins or grapes. Of these cases, over 50 animals developed clinical signs ranging from vomiting to life-threatening kidney failure, and seven dogs died.

PennySarah Wright of Wisconsin lost her two year-old Australian Shepherd / Saint Bernard Mix, Penny (see picture) early this April to kidney failure after Penny ingested approximatelyone cup of raisins."Penny ate the raisins and vomited later that same day," recalls Sarah."I took her in to be evaluated by our local veterinarian, who felt that she was simply experiencing stomach upset, as the clinic was not aware of the potential for toxicity with raisin ingestions in dogs.A few days later, when Penny didn't improve, my veterinarian ran blood tests and found that Penny had developed acute renal failure, and despite efforts to save Penny, she passed away."

Sarah wanted to share her unfortunate loss with others "so that other dog owners can be educated about the toxic potential of grapes and raisins, and avoid having their dogs go through what Penny did." She would also like to urge pet owners to educate themselves about issues pertinent to their pets' health, in order to become an effective advocate for the medical care they receive.

Much is still yet to be discovered about the toxic principle associated with grape and raisin ingestions, as well as the exact mechanism leading to kidney damage in some dogs. It is also not clear if only canines are susceptible to developing a toxicosis, and additionally if only certain dogs are affected, or if chronic, long term ingestions can lead to the same effects as large, acute or single ingestions.As there are still many unknowns with the toxic potential of grapes and raisins, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center advises not giving grapes or raisins to pets in any amount.

The ASPCA will continue to monitor this situation, and will provide any additional information as it becomes available. Please call (888) 426-4435 if you have a pet that has ingested grapes or raisins, or you suspect may be experiencing problems.

###

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

For over 27 years, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has been the premier animal poison control center in North America. The center, an allied agency of the University of Illinois, is the only facility of its kind staffed by 25 veterinarians including 10 board-certified toxicologists and 14 certified veterinary technicians. Located in Urbana, Illinois, the specially trained staff provides assistance to pet owners and specific analysis and treatment recommendations to veterinarians pertaining to toxic chemicals and dangerous plants, products or substances 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In 2005, the center handled over 100,000 cases. In addition, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center provides extensive veterinary toxicology consulting on a wide array of subjects including legal cases, formulation issues, product liability, regulatory reporting and bio surveillance. To reach the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, call 1-888-426-4435. For more information on the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center visit www.aspca.org/apcc (1/06)
 
 

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