Environmental trigger for shedding in dogs?


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Old 12-11-06, 03:14 PM
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Environmental trigger for shedding in dogs?

I brush my dog [almost] every day, and dry mop the floor, too. I don't mind doing this, or I wouldn't, if it worked.

My house looks like it's alive, and could use a trim.

I think this might be due to the unusually mild winters we have been having; my current theory is that the shorter days are causing the dog to grow a thcker coat, but the warm air is causing it to fall right out.

I have started leaving the dog enclosed in two rooms on the first [colder] floor, with the lights on, during the day. Are there any biologists out there who know if this poor chemist is on the right track?
 
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Old 12-11-06, 04:24 PM
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Don't have an answer for you but just wanted to say I have the same situation going on lately. Looks like the fur is growing up the walls all around with tumbleweeds everywhere else And the more she's brushed, the more she sheds!
 
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Old 12-11-06, 05:30 PM
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I doubt that artificial light and cool rooms will have much effect on the shedding your dog exhibits. Some breeds shed more and more frequently than others. My Aussies shed almost all of their undercoats in the spring over a span of a couple of weeks. They shed some almost all year long. In the late fall, the heavy winter undercoat comes in, but there is a lot of shedding to go along with it. I think that they shed the latent undercoat that has been around during the summer. Of course, this in one reason that Australian Shepards are high maintenance - they need brushing all year long.

So check your breed, it may just shed that much. Otherwise, check the dog's health. Poor nutrition may be a part of the problem, especially if the dog has bare spots or loses the long guard hair in noticeable amounts.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 06:13 PM
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Here's a couple of sites that should be helpful too.
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/shedding.htm
http://www.nzymes.com/Articles/dog_skin_hair_problems.htm

Newt
 
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Old 12-11-06, 06:23 PM
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Oh, I've had this dog a long time. It's only in the last few years the shedding has gotten out of hand. His coat [and skin] is healthy, but I can brush him down to a summer weight coat very easily; in the past, his coat would stay thick.

I used to walk him a lot more in the cold [about an hour a day], but we're both getting a little old for that.

Oh, I have a natural spectrum light source for the light.

If this works, I let you know.
 
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Old 12-12-06, 07:18 AM
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Well, pooh, I know all about dogs and other animals for that matter, and mine is healthy, is fed an expensive brand of food and has no skin conditions or bald spots, LOL! She's half Chow and half Husky, so she's definitely a cold weather dog with a lot of hair that sheds all the time. However, this past month we've had extreme warms and colds as far as the weather goes and like jh's dog, has been shedding excessively this past month. So, this problem is more likely weather related rather than poor health related, don't you think?
 
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Old 12-12-06, 05:21 PM
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Stress might do it too. Holidays are stressful for many pets, and they pick up on the parents' stress as well....
 
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Old 12-29-06, 02:19 PM
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Report on trying to overcome environmental triggers.

In addition to keep the dog confined to cool well-lit rooms during the day, we added daily long walks in the early morning.

It didn't really work. I do seem to be removing less fur during the daily brushing, but there has been no noticeable dimunition of shedding.


The good news is that keeping him confined to two rooms during the day does keep the rest of the house significantly cleaner.
 
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Old 12-29-06, 03:30 PM
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Hate shedding? Get an American Hairless Terrier!

Some breeds simply shed more than others. Most tend to shed some all the time. Those cute little breeds that need to be kept trimmed are usually lighter shedders. Some breeds have a seasonal shedding period. Outdoor breeds that are kept inside simply are not outdoors enough for their bodies to recognize that the season has changed.

Shedding is natural. If it's going to fall out all over the house, it's best to spend some time outdoors every day to diligently brush and spend some quality time together. The more you brush outside, the less will be lost inside.
 
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Old 12-29-06, 04:23 PM
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My spouse's very good idea was to brush the dog in the basement; if it's too cold out, I don't take the time to do a thorough job, but it's warm enough in the basement.

Those Swiffer-type mops are great at picking up pet hair.

I think it is FINALLY going to get cold soon, so I'll watch to see if he starts to shed less. His coat and skin are still nice and healthy.

Re: the AHT
My cat is bigger than that.

[And I always get embarassed for dogs that need to wear sweaters; if I could get past that, I'd probably adopt a greyhound.]
 
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Old 01-01-07, 06:44 AM
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Smile

I sympathize with you, JH. I have 2 Collies who seems to do nothing but leave furballs everywhere this year.

I did start adding Lipoderm to their diets a few months back even though they eat a premium food, it seems to have helped some.

They get baths about every 6 weeks and I found using a forced air blast dryer really blows the hair off of they while drying.

You haven't mentioned you pups coat length, but a few implements that i find helpful are a rubber 'ZoomGroom' to pull the loose stuff off without throwing it around too much. I also recommend an undercoat rake for long-coated breeds to pull the loose fluff out of the coat.

Hope that helps, but I agree that the warmer temps are wreaking havoc on the dogs shed cycles.
 
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Old 01-20-07, 01:45 PM
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Up-date on shedding.

My dog FINALLY has a winter coat. It came in virtually overnight. And he is much more comfortable [he's stopped scratching his back on any rough surface he can find.]

I skipped the brushing and mopping for two nights, but that third night I still got barely a brushful of hair off of him, and I can see the difference in his coat. It is much thicker. [When I first posted I would get a brushful off in a single stoke.]

This co-incided with the temperature finally dropping below freezing most nights, but, since the inside temperature has not changed, and it is usually warmer when he gets his morning walk, I don't see how that could have been the cause.

So after a month of brushing him thoroughly almost every night and walking him at least half an hour every other day [usually longer and more often] and leaving him outside at least that long every night [which he does not like], it seems that a couple of sub-freezing walks re-set his fur retention clock.

So, for any entrepreneur out there, here is a business opportunity. Convert an old meat freezer into a kennel and rent the space in 1/2 hour increments to desparate dog owners. Recommend a initial 3-day treatment, and weekly refreshers.
 
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Old 01-20-07, 07:09 PM
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Jhomeowner, wonderful news! I thought of you the other day when I vacuumed the house and didn't have to change the bag until I was done! With 4 large dogs and 2 cats, it get a bit hairy around here.

"So, for any entrepreneur out there, here is a business opportunity. Convert an old meat freezer into a kennel and rent the space in 1/2 hour increments to desparate dog owners. Recommend a initial 3-day treatment, and weekly refreshers."

You gave me a good giggle with that one!!
Newt
 
 

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