Hard to Climbing-up on the Couch/Arthritis?


  #1  
Old 01-08-07, 10:31 AM
PineCone's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Eastern US
Posts: 599
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hard to Climbing-up on the Couch/Arthritis?

Hi:
The male Beagle at age 6, he has a problem of climbing up on the couch in the living room and day-bed in the family/back rooom. I started to notice this problem around this, past Summer. However, I dismissed this as he might have stepped on some 'sharp' object when we took him to the park where sometime, kids in the neighborhood playing and forgot to pick-up small trash that includes sode bottles.

The beagle is otherwise, healthy, pleasant and very sweet dog. Prior to this problem of limping around the house, not often, but mostly after getting back home from the Park running around for about 30-45 minutes. Seeing him on the hind leg(right one) started annoying everyone in my household as we suspect that he have gotten an Arthritis like we, human's. But, again as seeing his age, at age 6 I can hardly convince myself this being due to the Arthritis he's experiencing. Rather, he may have some 'muscle spasm' or other muscularskeletal problems?

Any imputs on this regard would be truly appreciated.
 

Last edited by PineCone; 01-08-07 at 10:45 AM.
  #2  
Old 01-08-07, 12:31 PM
N
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,654
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi Pine Cone,

One of my dogs is an 8 year old lab and she started limping last summer as well. She would limp after a walk or after sleeping. Sometimes it seemed like the front right and sometimes the front left. A couple of trips to the vet and the addition of Cosequin to her diet and no improvement. Finally we (the vet and me) decided to put her under sedation to take x-rays and do a more extensive exam. Nothing is showing to be the problem. Some possibilities could be a rotator cuff problem or some type of neurological problem in her neck. The vet did say that upon examination while she was under sedation, the rotator cuff on the left side appeared to be too loose.

Our next appointment is with an orthopedic vet on the 25th. If that shows nothing then it will be off to a neurologist.

Your dog's problem could be a disc problem in the spine that is effecting the leg or something else. I would suggest a visit to your vet. Write down all that you see before you go so you don't forget anything.

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 01-08-07, 12:50 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,893
Received 1,197 Upvotes on 1,152 Posts
Could be a lot of things. Arthritis or hip dysplasia come to mind, but a back problem is possible. This is what vets are for.
 
  #4  
Old 01-08-07, 02:28 PM
logcabincook's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Rocky Mountain Foothills
Posts: 517
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
As others have said it could be alot of things. Have your pup checked out and get to the bottom of it. It may be arthritis (I've seen it in 2-year-old Goldens) or something more serious... Best to be on the safe side!
 
  #5  
Old 01-10-07, 05:19 AM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 550
Received 12 Upvotes on 7 Posts
As mentioned there are a lot of things that could be causing the discomfort, and definitely a trip to the vet with a thorough exam is in order, in my opinion. Arthritis is also something that can occur at any age with pets, just as it can with people.

One thing that might be helpful for his comfort is to set up a smallish step up for him onto the couch and daybeds. Perhaps a small box that is half the height or similar? They also make steps just for pets with such difficulty and I am sure you would find such if you *Googled* for Pet Steps.

Hope this helps and keep us posted.
 
  #6  
Old 01-10-07, 12:36 PM
PineCone's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Eastern US
Posts: 599
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi:
Thanks all for the responses.

After having read all of your responses and concern on this, we, the family started to think of which is best for both, the beagle and us, human.

As the first responser stated, it's needed quite a money for this form of issue, due to neurological issue involved. For that, to be honest, we are NOT quite ready. We, the family have a good insurance/BCBS and another good-coverage for the family, however there is NO pet-insrance we are supposed to carry for this issue.

In the meantime, the sweet Beagle started to adjust to his current physical condition, on which he takes a nap on the thick carpet and sleeps during the night on the floor with a thick blanket next to the couch or day-bed. He rarely jumps on the couch any longer. It seems he doesn't want us any burden. For that, we are truly grateful to have such an understanding and smart-brained pet-beagle!

This beagle is, for us a third one. The very first beagle is a sort of 'stray/abandoned' beagle in the park and picked him up. The second one had Epilepsy along with other related ailments, but in the end he was not pretty site, then we decided him to sleep. Then, we have learned a lot about beagle over the years through good and bad, 'thick and thin' experience.

Until this, past late-Spring, he had a problem of urinating around the couch, but he corrected this horrible behaviour with a help of us, human's intervention. For just in case, I made a thick couch cover by hand-sewing fabric that found at local fabric store.

As of today, the pet-Beagle seems somehow OK, except a bit of limping around with one of his hind legs. If, however his condition getting aggravating, then we plan to take him to the vet for examination and advice. In the meantime, we, all enjoying a good company, the Beagle.
 
  #7  
Old 01-10-07, 08:02 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,893
Received 1,197 Upvotes on 1,152 Posts
If the dog is limping, he's in pain. It is irresponsible of you to let this continue. You agreed to take care of this animal when you adopted him, now do it!
 
  #8  
Old 01-10-07, 09:49 PM
N
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,654
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Pine Cone,

I too am disturbed at the conclusion you have come to. If this were your child limping would you just say that he/she is limping less now and doesn't need to go to the doctor?

I live in Maryland too and am involved in animal rescue. If finances are a problem or you wish to rehome your dog I would be very happy to assist you. It is MOST important that you take the dog to the vet to find out why he is limping. If it becomes too expensive we can go from there. There are groups that can help with the expense if needed and I can try and help with that.

Not taking the dog to the vet when it is obviously suffering is considered cruel and neglectful. It's also against the law. Please let me help if you need it.

Newt
 
  #9  
Old 01-13-07, 07:21 PM
PineCone's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Eastern US
Posts: 599
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Hi:
Thanks for the responses.

The beagle is fine now. This afternoon, we took him to the park where he was very happy running around all over the place.

In my guess, .... probably he had actually a slight injured paw, but without climbing up on the couch and day-bed, the time helped it heal. He's still, taking a nap on the blanket next to couch or day-bed, but he loves to jump on the bed sometme.

As to 'Arthritis,' it seems he doesn't have one, as seeing that he is able to run and walk, although sometimes I notice his walk is a bit awkward, like an old-dog's walk. Other than that, he's a happy and energetic dog.

One thing for which he has a crave is that he loves a company, even a neighborhood cat coming in our backyard for over-nite sleep due to coziness in our back-yard shed that has half opened door that resembles 'fort.'

Thanks for your great concern along with a great tip on this.
 
  #10  
Old 01-24-07, 11:45 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,126
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Torn ligament is the most common knee injury in dogs.

I'm personally familiar with this injury, as the dalmatian I often look after had it, still suffers from it despite surgery.

Put two and two together. Overly energetic running around at the park is likely how the dog first got this injury. Now every time you let this dog race and leap and so forth, straining the knee, it'll get worse later. You've noted that, related it here. So what should you do about it?

For the dog's sake, keep it leashed wherever it's going to get super-excited and overexert that knee.

I'm sorry to say that - if this is a torn ligament - surgical correction will be very expensive. Even then, you'll have to keep the dog's running to a minimum, and arthritis will develop in that joint. The dog will have better mobility though.

If you want to maintain this animal without big vet bills (and no shame in that), do please keep the running within limits. I wouldn't insist you're responsible for injuries your animal probably brought on itself. But I think you ought to protect it from it's own overexcitement.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: