Fish dying


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Old 02-06-13, 08:51 PM
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Fish dying

My daughter has a fish bowl at her mom's place. She had a beta for about three years but it died a month or so after they moved to a new place. The replacement for that one died so my ex-wife put the bowl in a warmer room for the second replacement in case the temperature of the house was a problem but that one died in a couple days as well.

Now, I've had neither fish nor a water softener in my life but this new townhouse does have a water softener. Could the salt from that be the killer here?
 
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Old 02-06-13, 09:07 PM
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It's probably something different about the water... not necessarily the soft water, although that's a possibility, but tap water in general. Could also be the temperature, or temperature shock when it is being transferred, since they like warmer water.

Here's a couple links:

Betta In A Bowl - A Guide To Keeping And Caring For A Betta In A Fish Bowl
Changing Betta Fish Water | How to Change Beta Fish Water

Both mention using a water conditioner.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 03:03 AM
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Mitch17,

My first suggestion would be that the fishbowl needs to be cleaned properly with a TINY bit of bleach and warm water, and let to air dry. Any plants (plastic) rocks etc, can also be cleaned with the bleach solution, and let to air dry. Since Betta's need their water treated, as do all fish, be sure they are using a proper water conditioner for the fish in the water going into the bowl.

The links that XSleeper gave are a good start.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 07:27 AM
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Sounds good, thank you both.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 07:32 AM
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I used to have fish, for a really long time. When it came to water, I used to fill up buckets (just for water to be used for fish) and let it sit at least 5 days or more. This will clear the water of any additives that might have been used. Any of these additives can kill them, especially chlorine.
Also the temperature has to be pretty much exact. I would always put the fish in a bag with the previous water and let it float in the new water for an hour or two so the fish adjust to any temperature change.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 07:43 AM
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It's not expensive, would buying distilled water be a good idea?
 
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Old 02-07-13, 07:55 AM
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I wouldn't use distilled water, but the bottled spring water should be OK. It's basically tap water that's been sitting around to get rid of chemicals and additives, like I used to do.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 07:57 AM
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In which case the tap water is cheaper and easier. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 09:04 AM
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Just age the water and add some drops to eliminate chlorine. Do not use a completer water change, do it in stages over time to eliminate "shock". Keep everything stable in the bowl and the bigger, the better for betas since they like to build bubble nests and do not like to be frustrated. - I made the BIG mistake when starting out and put in an aerator!!!

The preparation for breeding is amzing, but not as good as the the actual process and the rearing, Avoid light changes and major air circulation if you try to breed them.

Dick
 
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Old 02-07-13, 09:08 AM
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I'm just going to add, that I used to clean the tanks with salt water, then rinsed well, rather than use bleach. Even a trace of bleach is very toxic to them.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 09:28 AM
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Bleach is ugly stuff, it's only in my house because I use it to clean the deck. I like the salt water idea.
 

Last edited by stickshift; 02-07-13 at 02:01 PM.
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Old 02-08-13, 12:08 AM
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For reference to those concerned about using bleach. I worked with 200+ aquariums ranging from 10 gallon to 205 gallon sizes. We ALWAYS used one capful of bleach to 5 gallons of water to disinfect the tanks. They were allowed to air dry and not once did we have an issue with fish dying after a cleaning of any of the 100+ tanks. Anytime we got a contagious disease in the tanks that was not easily treatable or we lost a lot for no apparent reason, we cleaned the tanks.
 
 

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