Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Insect, Pests and Animal Control. Home Pets and Farm Animals > Pets, Wild and Farm Animals
Reload this Page >

What are the signs that an American Pit Bull Terrier is a bad seed?

What are the signs that an American Pit Bull Terrier is a bad seed?


  #1  
Old 06-24-20, 08:59 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
What are the signs that an American Pit Bull Terrier is a bad seed?

My daughter wants an APBT so in helping her find one I've been talking to other owners and I'm learning that every now and then you can get one that is incorrigibly aggressive.
In other words having to be constantly restrained anytime it meets someone who's not living in the house. Or worse yet if the owner spends some time away and it's used to a temporary caretaker then it attacks the owner.
She'd want a dog that can protect the house but not attack any guest she has over, including me.
What are the signs, early on, that this dog will be nearly impossible to train to behave?
 

Popular Reply

 
10-20-20, 03:03 AM
marksr
marksr is offline
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,241
Received 427 Votes on 382 Posts
I'm thinking if you have any doubts maybe you should consider a different breed.
 
  #2  
Old 06-24-20, 03:24 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,556
Received 966 Votes on 887 Posts
You may get better results if you tell everyone what your acronym means.
 
  #3  
Old 06-24-20, 04:08 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,913
Received 108 Votes on 95 Posts
APBT=American Pit Bull Terrier.
 
  #4  
Old 06-24-20, 04:22 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 62,628
Received 1,608 Votes on 1,480 Posts
Title changed to better reflect the topic,
 
  #5  
Old 06-24-20, 04:43 PM
Shadeladie's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA - USA
Posts: 4,673
Received 178 Votes on 144 Posts
It's a hard one to answer since dogs can be different once you bring them home.
I would get one thru a pitbull rescue. They've lived with and evaluated the dogs they adopt out, so can tell you just what to expect.
 
joecaption voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 06-24-20, 05:06 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,913
Received 108 Votes on 95 Posts
Sorry but just not a pit bull of any type fan.
Just to unpredictable!
Had one living down the street from me that got along get with kids, my dog would go down there and they got along great.
Owner comes by the house with the dog on the leash and it tried to rip my dogs throat out.
 
  #7  
Old 06-24-20, 10:33 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
would a doberman, shepherd, or rottweiler be less unpredictable?
 
  #8  
Old 06-25-20, 03:32 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,987
Received 143 Votes on 116 Posts
Michael, Visit this site and you will probably change your mind about having a pit bull. They are by far responsible for the most dog attack fatalities than any other breed. I also disagree about "rescue" pit bulls. As JoeCaption said - they are unpredictable. One day they are sweet loving dogs and the next they are eating your kid's face off.
 
  #9  
Old 06-25-20, 05:16 AM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
Michael,

There are alternatives to the APBT which is still a very temperamentally unstable breed. This is mainly due to lack of committed breeding programs and lack of solid foundation dogs of stable and sound temperaments.

If she has her heart set on a "Bully Type" I would encourage you to contact a reputable breeder of American Staffordshire Terriers who has been breeding AND showing their breed for at least 10 years. Any reputable breeder will have dogs of stable temperament and be just as much a family dog, as a protector with proper training.

Staffies or AmStaffs are solid and predictable dogs with the same positive attributes that the APBT has, but without the instability(when purchased from a responsible and reputable breeder) that Pitbulls have.

I would steer you clear away of any dog not bred by a reputable breeder for any sort of protection work...it saves a lot of heartache and dangerous situations, when you know the background and bloodlines of such a dog.

I am definitely not "anti-Pitbull" at all, but I also have seen what can happen with any of the Bully breeds when the dogs do not have a stable mentality, which comes from a reputable and responsible breeding program.

Do keep us posted on what you choose to do.
 
  #10  
Old 06-25-20, 05:31 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,241
Received 427 Votes on 382 Posts
You might want to check with your insurance company before getting a dog. My homeowner's ins either excludes liability or charges extra for certain breeds of dogs. Pitbulls are one of those. They send someone out every so many yrs to verify the property being insured is insurance worthy. One of the pics they took when they came out last time was of my collie/shepard mix.
 
clancy voted this post useful.
  #11  
Old 06-25-20, 08:36 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,987
Received 143 Votes on 116 Posts
Mark, I had forgotten about the insurance angle. My insurance specifically exempts several breeds from my coverage, one of which is the pit bull.

What a lot of folks and pit bull apologist's don't understand is that pit bulls are naturally inclined to be nasty. Just like a beagle is naturally inclined to chase rabbits, a lab is naturally inclined to retrieve sticks, pit bulls are naturally inclined to fight. Add on top of that irresponsible breeding, cruelty of owners and dogs deliberately trained to attack. If you watch Judge Judy you'll get her opinion of the breed based on the cases she sees in her "courtroom." I don't know how many times I've seen dog owners in tears describing how a pit bull gutted their family pet.

As you can guess I am not a fan of the breed. That started when my 3 year old daughter and I were attacked by one that broke his rotted cloths line leash. The only thing that saved her from injury. was the broken rope got tangled in a broken down fence before he could reach her.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #12  
Old 06-26-20, 10:42 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 147
Received 12 Votes on 12 Posts
How would you characterize the person who will be the owner master? Some people are not suited to successfully own strong willed dogs. I am sure you know owners who have never corrected or otherwise established dominance over an animal. They let their pet bark, scratch, growl, pull at the leash, bound out doors, etc. Essentially these are passive owners. Is this breed a good match for this owner?

Some people can can even make “purse dogs” a terror to be around.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #13  
Old 06-26-20, 12:34 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
the more I research pit bulls the more I'm leaning that they can be unpredictable, e.g. 5 years of being a loving dog and then turn around and attack.
my daughter isn't the type of person that would handle herself well in that situation.
in researching alternatives, it's pointing more towards either a boxer or a short-haired German Shepherd.
They are more intelligent so they can figure out things better for themselves that a first-time trainer might not be able to communicate as effectively and they're (reportedly) not as unpredicatble.
definitely the tip to get from a breeder is one I'll follow if at all po$$ible.
anyone have thoughts/experiences they can share on either a boxer or a shepherd?
 
  #14  
Old 06-26-20, 12:39 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
Michael,

I definitely think a Boxer would be a good idea. Again with the caveat to be sure not to buy from a backyard/irresponsible breeder or pet store. German Shepherds are awesome dogs, but in all honesty, more of a breed for experienced owners. Meaning no disrespect to your daughter.

Your daughter can go through a good training course with the pup when she gets it and will learn along with the pup as it grows, to be a good owner.

If you have any questions about the type of trainer or training to look for, or how to find a good breeder, please feel free to reach out.
 
  #15  
Old 08-19-20, 07:06 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Responded to a posting for someone looking to rehome an 8 month old female German Shepherd. Everything looks good but what concerns me is that this dog still isn't fully trained to pee and poop outside. They say close but not 100%. A quick Google search says the average dog should be fully trained by 4-6 months. Given that this is a GS who are supposed to be smart and females are supposedly easier to train, what could the issue be?
 
  #16  
Old 08-19-20, 07:35 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

GSDs can be extremely great dogs. They are very smart and do require a LOT of training and attention to attitude. People often are lazy with training, especially housebreaking.

I would think the issues are more with owners, than the dog...

If you and she have a connection, I'd say it is definitely worth a try. Be sure to get a good trainer lined up and begin as soon as possible with her proper obedience training.

Two other very important things be sure to wait until she's fully grown before getting her spayed. Have the vet check her growth plates around 18 months to 2 years will be about right. Yes DO get her spayed, it will help her be more stable in the long run. Also, have her hips xrayed for Hip Dysplasia. She'll still be a great dog if she has Hip Dysplasia, but there are things you'll want to do to help her stay pain free for as long as possible.

Do keep us posted on how things go.
 
  #17  
Old 10-18-20, 11:19 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
so after lots of searching, since the coronavirus, dogs have been flying off the shelves, I've seen breeders charging $2500 (on up), tried to get into an adoption meet-n-greet event, full capacity - which brings me to one opportunity that has come up (about 2 hours away) ...
a lady is fostering an APBT, says it's the sweetest thing, gets along with kids, cats, etc. and would keep it but already has 4 other dogs.etc etc. She said the reason people have been shying away is due to age (7 years) and size (apparently large but I'll ask lbs) I asked to do a quick FaceTime this afternoon before driving out for 2 hours.next weekend to meet...curious to get some thoughts/recommendations on the situation from some of the more experienced dog owners?
 
  #18  
Old 10-18-20, 12:23 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

It sounds like a dog who may be a good choice. You definitely want to meet her in person and see how she gets along with you and your daughter both. She would most likely be a good dog for you, if the rescuer is experienced and knows the breed.

Do let us know how things go and whether you decide to take her or not. Bless you for looking to take in a rescue.
 
  #19  
Old 10-18-20, 06:33 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Did the FaceTime, 100 lb gentle muscular dog, only concern is tearing up the Pergo floor. Itís scratch resistant level three, are there claw covers that can be applied?
 
  #20  
Old 10-18-20, 07:12 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

Sounds like you probably want to look into Soft Claws:

Soft Claw Covers for Dogs and Cats

Also, keeping the nails properly trimmed will be extremely helpful for keeping the scratches to a minimum. Any good groomer can do it for less than $10. When you take the dog in for a vet check(please do this!) have your vet teach you how to trim them.

Do let us know how things go. I'm excited for you and your daughter, and your new puppers
 
  #21  
Old 10-18-20, 07:21 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,987
Received 143 Votes on 116 Posts
Be sure to let us know when the APBT freaks out and eats some kid's face.
 
manden voted this post useful.
  #22  
Old 10-19-20, 05:33 AM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
CWBuff, that comment borders on unacceptable. Please cease and desist these kinds of comments they serve no purpose.
 
marksr, Oberon voted this post useful.
  #23  
Old 10-19-20, 07:11 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
cwbuff, can you elaborate pls
 
  #24  
Old 10-19-20, 07:18 AM
Shadeladie's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA - USA
Posts: 4,673
Received 178 Votes on 144 Posts
Obviously, CW feels that ALL pitbulls are dangerous and will bite a kid in the face. Of course, that's not true. And of course, some are, but I find most owners are responsible owners and keep a tight leash on their dogs. Unfortunately, there are some bad owners and they're the ones that give pitbulls a bad name. Not saying that some breeds are definitely more dangerous, but it's the owners that are more so, IMO.
My neighbor has an American Bullie and it must not know it's one. He's one of the friendliest dogs I ever met.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 10-19-20 at 11:06 AM. Reason: Spelling
  #25  
Old 10-19-20, 08:55 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
ShadeLadie, I'm pretty confident that we can keep the dog on a leash and away from others, my concern would be a family member living in the house, or someone visiting, like my 70 year old mom, getting attacked.
When we go see/pickup the dog this weekend, what are the things to look for that this dog could freak out, maybe there are some small tests that we can give it to see if this is a possibility?
 
  #26  
Old 10-19-20, 09:17 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,987
Received 143 Votes on 116 Posts
Michael I apologize for my wise ass post but I suggest that you visit this site and read the statistics re pit bulls. Read about all the people killed or maimed by a "sweet" family pet that never hurt anyone. You should also consider your financial exposure should your pit bull attack someone. Is it worth it?

This breed is named pit bull for a reason. They were bred for fighting in a pit. The reason they were bred for fighting is because of their natural tendencies.

There are so many non dangerous dog breeds available for adoption it perplexes me why anyone would want to bring such a dangerous animal into their homes.
 
  #27  
Old 10-19-20, 10:50 AM
Shadeladie's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: PA - USA
Posts: 4,673
Received 178 Votes on 144 Posts
what are the things to look for that this dog could freak out
It's been my experience that there are none at that point. They're usually on their best behavior when you go there, like they know it's their chance to find a new home. It's when they're at your home, that the test begins. They then sometimes will get protective of both you and your home. Not all but some. It's the only way to test. Some rescues will let you take them home for a trial visit. This is probably the only option for you unless they've had the dog long enough to analyze their behavior.
 
  #28  
Old 10-19-20, 01:17 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Southern Arizona
Posts: 157
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
Unfortunately it is a crap shoot. I once purchased a male Samoyed for my wife to show. Nikki was close to standard and was a typical male. As he got older say about 3 he started to be come aggressive to everyone.
He jumped on the bed when Linda was making it, seemed like play in the beginning. But he decided to lunge at her.
My shoulder caught him in mid lunge and he connected with the wall followed by me. A time out ensued. I played pretty rough with the dogs, I used them for sledding, Yep owned 2 sleds at the time.
About a week later Nikki killed my lead dog Jeep in the laundry room where they were fed from the time they were all puppies. I grabbed him while Linda screamed, found a nice place in the desert and shot him. Strike 2.
Research after the fact which should have been in the from of the fact found he was the last of the line that had started in Oregon. Most were shot for killing chickens, while one killed a calf. Nikki's sister got a hold of a child.
If it is possible check the history of the animal. Registered dogs can be traced. Any history of aggressiveness would, be a disqualifies for me.
Pits make great pets and can be very protective. My sister in law has one. Wonderful as long as she is home. A bit more on edge when just the husband and kids are there.
IMO all breeds will choose someone to listen to in a family setting. Commonly the person that feeds them.

Pits are not for me. Good luck with your search. Aggressiveness can be a product of the environment.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #29  
Old 10-19-20, 01:24 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
we can all take turns feeding the dog. If the dog doesn't display aggressive behavior at 7 is it safe to say he won't "snap" at some point?
when outside we can put him on a short leash, my main concern is attacking family members inside, especially while we're sleeping
 
  #30  
Old 10-19-20, 01:30 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

I honestly don't think you have to be concerned with the dog attacking while you are sleeping...it's not in domestic dogs' nature to attack at those sort of times...not saying it can't happen, but not really probable, in my opinion. I honestly think that you'll most likely be alright, but do watch for any signs of aggression as time goes on.
 
  #31  
Old 10-19-20, 01:32 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
If people in the house are safe for the most part, is there any kind of pet insurance I can buy that would cover attacks on other people? let's say we take him to a dog park and he goes bezerk?
 
  #32  
Old 10-19-20, 01:40 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,241
Received 427 Votes on 382 Posts
You homeowner's insurance usually covers that but many policies specifically exempt certain breeds of dogs - check with your agent.
 
  #33  
Old 10-19-20, 01:45 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
one scenario that comes to mind is I noticed pitbulls are both active and athletic, my youngest is a hs wrestler and will play-wrestle dogs that he knows but the dogs typically aren't interested and just leave, is he inviting a bite?
 
  #34  
Old 10-20-20, 03:03 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,241
Received 427 Votes on 382 Posts
I'm thinking if you have any doubts maybe you should consider a different breed.
 
Baldwin, cwbuff, RhainyC voted this post useful.
  #35  
Old 10-20-20, 03:04 PM
O
Member
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 189
Received 7 Votes on 5 Posts
Michael,

How experienced a dog owner is your daughter? Your questions and concerns make me wonder if you (and she) aren't very comfortable around bigger dogs, but I could be wrong.

Some dog breeds may not a good fit fo ran inexperienced owner, the APBT being one of them. Honestly your indecision over the appropriateness of the breed makes me concerned that this may not be your best choice. Just as i would never recommend a nordic breed, for example, to a first time dog owner. Just not appropriate fit.

Again based solely on your questions and concerns I think that your daughter might be a lot better served by looking for a breed that is more "inexperience-friendly" such as a lab or another larger dog of a breed that is
more forgiving and tolerant of owner mistakes. I think that perhaps an older and calmer German Shepherd or boxer (as mentioned previously) that came from a good environment might also be a more appropriate match for your daughter.

 
cartman, RhainyC voted this post useful.
  #36  
Old 10-20-20, 06:37 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
marksr/Oberon, I wouldn't say I have reservations as much as I just want to do my due diligence in researching this.
So there are 4 of us in the house and none of us have ever owned a dog.
However given that it's 7 years old and has already been trained to poo outside, sit, shake etc I'm not sure what else we would train it to do
 
  #37  
Old 10-20-20, 07:01 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

Ok...Did you mention somewhere else that none of you had ever owned a dog before and I just missed that part???

I've scanned back through the thread and did NOT see you say that anywhere else...

If none of you have ever owned a dog, Please, Please, PLEASE...Do Not Get A Pit Bull OR Any Bully Type
breed.

You need to find a good large Labrador or Collie or Golden Retriever or some other similar first owner friendly type breed as Oberon suggested...

You getting a Bully Breed of ANY Kind is sadly asking for trouble with you not having any dog experience.

Please seriously take this suggestion seriously...you'll end up regretting getting a Pit if you decide to do so, even one who's 7+ and trained.

Please let us know what you decide to do...
 
cartman, PAbugman voted this post useful.
  #38  
Old 10-20-20, 07:26 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I think I will err on the side of caution and pass on the APBT then
Just curious why an APBT wouldn't be suitable for a first time owner(s)? (A friend of mine, first time owner, got one as a puppy and it's worked out well for him)

Also you mention Labrador or Collie or Golden Retriever but I've also heard Shepherd and Boxer, what about Dobermans?
 
  #39  
Old 10-20-20, 07:53 PM
RhainyC's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Blaine, Washington
Posts: 555
Received 9 Votes on 5 Posts
MichaelChang,

The reason for not suggesting Bully Type Breeds is many fold, but the main one is that you need to have a lot of real dog experience to visually notice the cues the dog may give for any issues that may arise. These things take a lot of years and/or training to really get to be experienced enough to catch.

As for Dobies, they wouldn't be my first suggestion for a new dog owner either. My family used to breed them for both show and Law Enforcement work. They are another breed for an experienced dog owner as well. Shepherds if from a good bloodline and/or older and more settled, would be a better suggestion than a Dobie to be honest.

Most dog breeds I have mentioned, Labradors, Goldens and Collies, are large and can be very protective. If you decide on a Labrador, be sure to try to stay with the American "Field Type" Labrador, as they are much more athletic and tend to be more attentive than the English(show type) of Labs. I've worked with both.

Goldens are also a really awesome dog for first time owners and can also be protective without being aggressive. Same goes with Boxers.

If your daughter wants a protective dog, but not the aggressions that come with Protection Type Breeds, or those that "Appear Aggressive" I honestly think a good larger Labrador would be a good choice. They are very family oriented and can be very protective without being aggressive towards anyone, unless they feel their pack is in danger.

Others may have other suggestions as well.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #40  
Old 10-20-20, 09:14 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 962
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
The inability to notice visual signs is important, thanks.
I initially shyed away from Retrievers and Collies due to the amount of hair since the kids have allergies and the ENT recommended short haired pets. Hence my search for short-haired Shepherds, APBTs, Ridgebacks, Dobermans, etc. The Boxer would be a great choice but the energy level is high and I don't want to run into a situation where the dog wants to play but no one's available for play at the time.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: