Best Recharger for batteries for Digital

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  #1  
Old 10-21-04, 08:24 PM
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Please respnd here rather than a pm, more will learn that way...............Thanks

Amy wrote:

I'm enjoying my fujifilm...but need more time to get used to..
the ins and outs. I'm what you might call a ambitious novice. I've never owned an SLR- just point and shoot camera's but have always had an interesting eye for photography. The fuji is really nice...i'm not sure how to take closeups yet. It seems like when I put it on macro and shoot (it is in wide angle) i often get blurred pictures. I recently had to take a closeup of my lip and the best way to do it was to take a picture of my face and then crop down to my lips?? I'm take mostly pictures of my incredibly cute boys who are all under 4 1/2. Have not tried thier sports mode for moving subjects yet....but believe i may have to use that for blurred moving subjects too. The quality seems great when you do not get blur. I think it is a matter of learning the camera. I have to get re-chargeable batteries before I can do much more testing

Have to run now...baby 3 is up
Amy
 
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Old 10-21-04, 08:49 PM
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Amy, to correct the lack of focus in macro,

You will need to refer to your manual.

There is a focus distance range shown in the specifications.
It will be a number, possibly like my camera : Macro focus distance: 3 1/2" to 31".
This means I can take a picture on the macro setting between those two distances and it will be in focus.
This is called depth of field and is very important to understanding the basics of photograhy.

Because you can't see what's in focus due to the automatic nature of digital cameras, you will have to remember the numbers for your camera.
As a reminder when taking macro, you could tie a piece of string to your camera with a knot at the min and max focus distance as a guide.
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-04, 08:01 AM
mattame
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Arrow Got the rayovac 15 min! thanks greg for the...

idea on the string.....what is the advantage to using macro....are you supposed to be able to get closer to the subject. I'm going to have to check my manual on the specs.

I ended up getting the rayovac 15 minute charger and it works fine as of now...I couldn't find the 1 hour in target/walmart stores....only the 15 min.
We will see how the life of the batteries hold up. I need to buy more batteries for it for other uses. Any great sources for batteries???
need aa and aaa.
I also need to buy a 9 volt charger. Any thoughts on this?
Thanks a ton!!
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-04, 12:30 PM
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mattame,

Macro allows you to get VERY close to something and have it be in focus.

I don't have my manual handy and I should remember this but I think that while in normal mode the minimum distance for my camera is about 3', meaning any closer and it will be blurry.

Each camera when in macro has a different magnification so I can't say how big an image will look.
When in macro, your zoom function will be disabled and you will have to move the camera to frame the subject.
The magnification on mine will allow me to fully frame a small frog at about 6".

Macro will allow you to move in on something like a flower, and with the right light, be able to see a drop of nectar, glistening on the tip of a stamen.
Or, you could find a small frog and set up a picture with it sitting on a mushroom or tree fungus.

There are some fun things you can do with macro and with some creativity, take some pretty awesome pictures.

It takes a bit of experimentation with lighting being the biggest challenge.
The best is in direct sunlight with the camera off to the side so as not to block the light.
Flash on the camera will work but because you are working so close to the camera, the flash is in a poor position.
Objects that are about a foot away are starting to get out of the shadow of the camera mounted flash on my camera.

My next purchase will be a ring flash that mounts on the barrel of the lens and emits a soft flash for in close work and can be fired by slave accessory that is fairly inexpensive.

Let us know how macro works for you.

Oh ya, never tried 9V rechargeables.
 
  #5  
Old 12-03-04, 04:51 PM
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Rechargeable Batteries

I just came across this website that I thought might be of interest. But one word of caution. The writer gets REALLY TECHNICAL. But if you read through it I think you will find it informative. Plus he provides ratings of a large number of rechargeable batteries. For myself, I have been quite pleased with the Energizer cells I bought a couple of years ago. The set came with eight batteries plus the charger. This allows me to always have a set of batteries charging when I am using the other set (actually, I have two Energizer chargers and sixteen batteries). One thing I have noticed is that with another make of charger and matching batteries, the batteries don't seem to retain a charge as well as the Energizer cells while I am merely carrying them about. One additional thing. Using the rangefinder instead of the LCD screen when shooting greatly reduces the battery drain.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/ACCS/BATTS/BATTS.HTM
 
  #6  
Old 12-05-04, 04:27 PM
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Bob, thanks for the link. Very useful website, good to see somebody has actually done a standard comparison of many different battery brands. Interesting that none of the batteries met their mAh rating.

Would have been nice if they had tested some 2400 mAh batteries to see how those fare.
 
  #7  
Old 12-14-04, 12:22 PM
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Hi,

I have a Fuji 2600 2 Megapixel Digital Camera and the NiCad batteries I have keep dying after 5-10 pictures taken. I had these batteries/Camera for 2 years now. Does this mean I need a new set of rechargeable batteries or is my charger bad?? Please let me know.

Thanks,

greenda4
 
  #8  
Old 12-14-04, 01:33 PM
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My guess would be that it's the batteries. Rechargeable batteries do eventually wear out due I believe to normal chemical deterioration in the batteries. There is little - or perhaps I should say less - to go wrong with the rechargers themselves. That mostly would be component deterioration due to surges I would guess. If you know someone that has a charger for NiCad batteries you may try charging your batteries in it. Just be sure the chrger is for NiCad batteries or has a switch to handle NiCad batteries. That would tell you for sure. My recommendation would be to have at least one charger with two full sets of batteries. For example if your camera takes four AA batteries, you should have eight batteries total. One set would be at the ready in your camera, the other set recharging, or set aside after a recharge. For twenty dollars I bought an Energizer recharger with eight batteries at a Sam's Club. I have had it for over two years with no problem with either the batteries or the charger.

Bob
 
  #9  
Old 12-14-04, 03:52 PM
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NiCad's for digitial cameras

This is the first I'd heard of using NiCad's in a digital camera. I don't know why it hasn't come up before, but I do know that NiMH (nickel metal hydride) are the recommended battery type for cameras that take AA's.

Greenda4, do your NiCad batteries happen to have a rating on them in terms of mAh (milliamp-hours)? If it is significantly less than 2000 mAh (a typical number for NiMH AA's), it would be wise to switch to NiMH batteries. Also, do you use the flash a lot? That would limit the number of pictures you could take before needing a fresh charge.

It may be that you happen to have bad batteries, but if you are going to replace them anyway perhaps NiMH is the way to go.

(edit added) Just googled: nicad aa mah
It appears that most AA NiCads are rated between 700 and 1000 mAh, while NiMH are typically around 2000 mAh. Definately a compelling reason to use NiMH batteries, since they will last 2 or 3 times longer. If you buy them, look for the mAh rating; it could be as low as 1200. Get 2000 or higher. The extra money spent on longer-lived batteries is so-o-o-o worth it.
 

Last edited by Mark_W; 12-14-04 at 04:04 PM.
  #10  
Old 12-14-04, 06:13 PM
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I agree with what Mark said. I have tried using NiCad batteries in my digital camera. But they did not hold a charge for long. I was unaware of the differences in terms of capacity as Mark alluded to. The only batteries I use now are NiMH.

Bob
 
  #11  
Old 12-14-04, 06:44 PM
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Lightbulb

Oops! I made a mistake. I do have Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries and they are 1800 mAh batteries. I have Sunpak batteries with a Sunpak Charger. When I first got the batteries 2 yrs ago it seemed like I could get 50 pictures out of fully charged batteries easily. But now 2yrs later, I am struggling to get over 10 pictures out of fully charged batteries. Is this normal with these batteries?? Sorry for the confusion.

greenda4
 
  #12  
Old 12-14-04, 10:03 PM
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I really haven't tried to keep track of how many pictures I get from a set of fully charged batteries, mainly because I try to always have another set on hand and don't worry about how long they last. But I would say that I can easily get forty or fifty pictures from a fully charged set of batteries with power to spare. These are batteries I've had for two years. Do you normally shoot using the LCD or rangefinder? If you use the LCD it will significantly add to the drain on the batteries.

Bob
 
  #13  
Old 12-15-04, 07:07 AM
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Greenda, sounds like it is time to buy new batteries! Regardless of if you use the LCD, or flash, or whatever, your batteries' ability has dropped from 50 pictures to 10 pictures.

Um, in the oft chance it might be the charger's fault, hang on to your old batteries until you know you can get 50 photos from the new batteries. If the new batteries have the same problem, then it's time for a new charger.

(edit added) It sounds like you have just the one set of batteries, which might explain why they've lasted only two years. I have 4 sets of batteries -- since each set gets used just 1/4 of the time, they probably last longer for that reason.
 
  #14  
Old 12-15-04, 08:48 AM
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Yes..I do use the LCD when taking pictures and I do have 4 batteries and my camera uses 2 AA batteries, so I have an extra fully charged set everytime I go out with my camera, but both sets react the same way (10 pictures or so). I was also wondering if it could be the brand Sunpak?? What do you guys think??

greenda4
 
  #15  
Old 12-15-04, 11:10 AM
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If you look at the website I referred to in the post above, the SUNPAK1600 batteries were rated fairly low. How that reflects on the SUNPAK1800s you have I'm not sure. The fact that you could get 50 pictures on a single charge with two batteries and using the LCD seems to speak well for them in my opinion. Of course we're dealing with several issues here. One is how long the batteries will continue to function after a single charge, the other the actual lifetime of the batteries. Unfortunately, that website doesn't really address the second issue. Again, I would suggest that if you have a friend with another charger, try charging your batteries on it. Better yet, I would just simply buy another charger along with a set of batteries. Use that charger on your old batteries to see if it makes difference. You can never have too many batteries, especially if you are travelling. You may wish to refer to the ratings at that website to find a good mid-level set of batteries and charger. Also, in the mean time, try experimenting using only the rangefinder through a set of fully charged batteries (until the camera tells you to replace them) just to see if there is a significant difference.

Bob
 
  #16  
Old 02-11-05, 09:26 AM
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battery chargers

personally I've owned a few different chargers and still have some somewhere but my favorite one now is the RAYOVAC 15 MIN, NIMN. It not only charges fast but seems to hold the charge longer. I've had mine for a little over a year and bought a total of 8 extra batteries and use them for my cameras and for other items like the cd player of cassette player.
 
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