Canon EOS D20 - Lighting

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  #1  
Old 05-25-05, 05:50 PM
gojfb1
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Canon EOS D20 - Lighting

This is my husband's first digital, otherwise he is an amateur photographer with his other cameras. He took many digitals photos, checked them prior to development and they looked great. After processing, the photos are too dark. Why didn't they would show up too dark prior to development. I thought it would be wonderful to check photos prior to processing and make a smart dicision. Wasting too much money...
Anyone can help? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-25-05, 07:45 PM
cprevost
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He needs to learn what a histogram is and how to check it for each picture. This is the surest way to tell whether a picture will be too dark or not. I'm sure if you google d20 histogram you will get plenty of advice. Good Luck!
 
  #3  
Old 05-25-05, 08:05 PM
gojfb1
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Appreciate the reply...I am going to Google it now!
 
  #4  
Old 05-26-05, 06:46 PM
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Who did the processing and were they processed or just printed?

Are these high contrast scenes (lots of black and white, perhaps a bright spot or two)? High contrast will throw off the automatic printers.

Try a different processer. You can take digital phots to 20 different processers and get back 20 different results, including color shifting.

If processing yourself, you can lighten the pics without washing out anything.

Additional thoughts:
This is a serious digital SLR camera. It is definitely more than point and shoot. You and/or your mate should be doing some processing yourself. ALL photos, even film, are processed in some way. I don't mean just printing. Take a roll of film into any store and there will be some processing done before its printed. Get the most out of your camera. You've spent close to $2000 on the camera. Spring another couple of hundred for good photo software and do your own processing. I'd suggest taking the hobby to the next level and working with RAW files. Careful - this can be addicting.

Dark pics were a complaint of the digital rebel cameras and flash pictures, usually by those who never had a digital slr, using film or digital point and shoot. Point and shoot cameras have defaults preset. If your pictures are consistantly dark when printed, then simply make an adjustment on the camera. You can tell the camera to open the lens a 1/3 or more stops to let in more light.

I also suggest taking part in some of the forums on other sites. There are forums devoted for all Canon cameras and at least one or two devoted to specific camera models.
 

Last edited by BobF; 05-26-05 at 07:13 PM. Reason: additional comments
  #5  
Old 05-29-05, 07:42 AM
gojfb1
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Originally Posted by BobF
Who did the processing and were they processed or just printed?

Are these high contrast scenes (lots of black and white, perhaps a bright spot or two)? High contrast will throw off the automatic printers.

Try a different processer. You can take digital phots to 20 different processers and get back 20 different results, including color shifting.

If processing yourself, you can lighten the pics without washing out anything.

Additional thoughts:
This is a serious digital SLR camera. It is definitely more than point and shoot. You and/or your mate should be doing some processing yourself. ALL photos, even film, are processed in some way. I don't mean just printing. Take a roll of film into any store and there will be some processing done before its printed. Get the most out of your camera. You've spent close to $2000 on the camera. Spring another couple of hundred for good photo software and do your own processing. I'd suggest taking the hobby to the next level and working with RAW files. Careful - this can be addicting.

Dark pics were a complaint of the digital rebel cameras and flash pictures, usually by those who never had a digital slr, using film or digital point and shoot. Point and shoot cameras have defaults preset. If your pictures are consistantly dark when printed, then simply make an adjustment on the camera. You can tell the camera to open the lens a 1/3 or more stops to let in more light.

I also suggest taking part in some of the forums on other sites. There are forums devoted for all Canon cameras and at least one or two devoted to specific camera models.
My pics were processed at our local Camera Shop where I have always done my business with. My wife's pc does not have enough memory for the install if the software (she the pc person, not me!). With this being said, I am going to check on another shop for processing also...
Yes, I have visited and learned alot from the Canon Forum. I have caught on how to read the histogram, so I tested some pics and they turned out to be fair. I just finished a wedding, but obviously took 250 shots with my 35MM and just a few with the 20D. I have to learn alot yet to have enough confidence for the 20D at the weddings!

Oh, by the way - do you have the website for the specific Canon 20D model?
I think these Forums are absolutely wonderful.

Happy Memorial Day!
 
  #6  
Old 09-09-05, 05:46 PM
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Viewfinder Does Not Show Actual Picture

The viewfinder does not show the actual picture that has been recorded. It shows a representation of the picture. The results can be surprising if you judge results solely by the viewfinder, as you have found out. Learn about Histograms and judge your digital photos using the histogram feature of the camera, not just the viewfinder alone. There should be a way to see the histogram superimposed on the viewfinder as you compose the picture.
 
  #7  
Old 09-09-05, 06:11 PM
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Here's a popular one for the 20D
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/forum.asp?forum=1019
 
  #8  
Old 09-15-05, 10:43 PM
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Angry It might be a camera problem

It might be a camera problem. I had Canon EOS Digital Rebel which was terrible. It made some pictures too dark or too light at random. I was also new to digital cameras and I thought it was something I was doing wrong. Because I thought it was my fault, I kept it too long and passed the Camera's store return period. After researching on the Internet I discovered it was a camera problem. I lost about $200 because of a restocking fee. (Arlington Camera in Arlington, Texas). Now that I think about it, the box was open when the store clerk first showed it to me. So, someone else may have already returned it, I don't know. I called Canon and they stuck to their company policy and basically told me they were sorry and to get lost. I suggest you do a Google search for the terms:

"20D" (and)
problem (or) faulty (or) bad

That is a good way to research anything.
Another place to look it epinions.com
 
  #9  
Old 10-02-05, 07:02 AM
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Just a comment, if you pictures are coming out to dark that's overexposure.
You would then compensate by shutting the lense down a bit, not opening it up for more light to make it darker.
Or did I forget something about basic photography?

PS, I just got the Rebel XT, and it's great!
 
  #10  
Old 10-02-05, 05:44 PM
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Ya got it backward, ken. The key is over as in overexposure. That means too much exposure, ie) too much light.
Too dark is underexposure, not enough light.

don't know if you're confused on the aperature thing, though. Shutting it down is going to a higher f-stop, say from f5 to f8. Yea, thats right. The higher the number, the less light.
 
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