New used body

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  #1  
Old 08-01-06, 03:56 PM
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New used body

I gave my film cameras away when I went digital. None of my digitals have a good remote capability.

I am happy with what I have for digital, because of the ease and the ability to manage my shots with high powered software, but would like to get back into film for some specialized photography. Buying a new 8 MP SLR does not make sense for me.

I am thinking of getting a used 35mm body that will accept good telephoto lenses for shooting birds and other wildlife. I want to be able to use a remote with an extension. There seems to be a lot of good reasonably priced film bodies around that will accept many good lenses.

I was thinking of something like a used Canon 630 body and then shopping for the right telephoto lens. I really dont need a normal zoom lens, and do not want to go to the extreme telephoto lenses. - Probably a 300mm to 800mm without great light gathering ability would be OK.

Any thoughts?

Dick
 
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  #2  
Old 08-01-06, 10:14 PM
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Dick,

Yep, I'm one of those who abandoned a film SLR (I still have, but don't use) and went with the Canon 20D (awesome digital goodness). I can't suggest a film camera due to the fact...it's expensive for film developing for maybe 1-3 good shots (I actually mean a good shot, not an "oh honey, that's nice"). I've seen (regularly) a Canon 350D (Rebel XT - 8mp), Canon 10D, Canon 300D (original digital Rebel) go for around 400-500 used with extra goodies included. There are also cheaper 3-4mp dSLR from Canon that go for around 250-300 used. A lens you speak of, I believe would disappoint you in the long run...unless you get into some high dollars. You can get a lens in that range that uses mirrors cheap, but like I said... they are pretty much garbage.
This isn't probably what you wanted to read, but I would look at buying used...not on the "auction website" either. There are much better places to get great deals on camera equipment.

matt
 
  #3  
Old 08-02-06, 10:32 AM
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New used body

I am all set for my normal and business digital photography (macros, etc.). I just don't have the remote capability in my collection of digitals (not planning and all too convenient).

I was thinking of a used film body as a starter. I don't want to pay a lot of bucks for a 6 or 8 mp digital with all the program features and would rather put the extra money into a good lens (AF?) that I could either resell or put on a good digital $1000 SLR body later if I got more serious. Good lenses will hold their value better than cameras in a changing electronics market.

The cost of developing film is not a factor now. The inconvenience of film is something I can accept for a while.

Dick
 
  #4  
Old 09-01-06, 06:52 PM
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New used body

I took a step (I think) toward a quick short term solution to my long term desire.

Since I gave away an old 35mm camera (Canon AE1) and lenses, I managed to retreive a couple of the Canon EF lenses - (35-105) and (75 -300) and bought a Canon 630 body with an 1.8 50mm and a GR-20 grip for a remote release. It is amazing how you can find things when everyone wants to go digital to be light and "point and shoot" and the big boys have discontinued much of the film-based camera development. Fortunately lenses are still needed.

I plan to use this equipment as a short term solution to an immediate project involving remote wildlife shots. The subject to camera distance is 10 to 30 feet. Unfortunately, the distance from me to the camera will be 50 to 500 feet. Today, I could have shot a hawk 20 feet from a camera location, but I did not have it set up - yesterday a doe and fawn from 30 feet.

Ultimately (a year or 2), I will get a DSLR when the prices stabilize a bit, but who knows when, since they keep adding pixels and reducing the prices ($50 to $100 a month) on the old DSLRs. Now a 8 megapixel is passe'. Soon, the electronic definition will exceed the physical definition. I am confortable with digital photo manipulation and restoration and am not in a hurry. I am willing to have professional negative sacnning or can scan mine at 3220 dpi on my negative scanner. At worst, I can use professional processing all the way.

I know I can use a remote release or even add a wired extension for shorter distances (10 to 100'). This is not the best solution for my situation. Is there a good method to use a wireless remote within these parameters? - I am getting tired of Googling old sites and solutions. - Low temperatures could be a problem.

I know that RC planes/cars/boats have a good range. Is there a way to adapt the technology to a camera?

Thax for any opinions.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 09-02-06, 03:05 PM
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This is very possible using readily available R/C equipment. I've flown R/C for years and at one time adapted a servo to a small digital camera for taking aerial shots. If you can construct a bracket to mount a servo that will depress the shutter button, all you will need is a basic 2 channel radio system. At the camera, you will have a rechargeable battery, receiver, and servo. All this should come with the radio, and will be a relatively small package. The only problem that I had was the auto shutoff on most digital camera. A film camera with autowind would be no problem. If you have any other questions, I'll be glad to help.

Nashcat
 
  #6  
Old 09-02-06, 08:12 PM
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Good lead

Nashcat -

Thanks for the information. It shows it is possible and I will go to a good hobby shop to check out hardware. I know I can make some sort of bracket out of aluminum.

Instead of activating the shutter release on the camera and creating a bracket for the camera, I even may try to use the R/C servo to physically activate the butom on a 6' remote release cord. This might eliminate mounting things directly on the camera.

I am also looking into a way to electronically activate the remote cord that has a T3(?) fitting.

Thnx again!

Dick
 
  #7  
Old 09-02-06, 11:09 PM
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When you look for a R/C radio system. Please get one that is listed for "Surface frequencies". It will be on a different frequency band that what is used for model aircraft. If by some remote chance that you interfere with another radio, it would be much less damaging for a remote controlled car, than it would be to an airplane. When aircraft frequencies are compromised, gravity takes of control of the plane. The range of the radios is a couple of miles.

Things you should look for in a radio system.... 2 channel basic radio, rechargeable battery packs in transmitter and receiver, standard size servos, and charger. For your application, you will need none of the bells and whistles that are available on newer radios.

Here is a link to a pic of my servo/camera. The servo is held on with velcro. The camera is a cheap pocket pencam from Wally World. I didn't want to risk my Minolta in a plane.

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f386/john3435/camera.jpg
 
  #8  
Old 09-28-06, 02:46 AM
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Canon EOS A2

With everybody switching to digital, you can pick up sed SLRS that are in mint condition for literally pennies on the dollar. As a professional photographer I have used Canon EOS A2s for sometime and am quite happy with them, however with the market so flooded with used bodies, you can probabaly pick up an A2 for about $40 or less.
 
  #9  
Old 09-28-06, 06:17 AM
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Update on used body project

My project is progressing well and is working better than I thought. It is also much more enjoyable than I thought.

Equipment:
1. Used Canon EOS 630 w/50 mm Canon lens and GR-20 grip. Purchased at a good price.
2. Old Canon EF 35 - 105 zoom
3. Old Canon EF 75 - 300 zoom
4. Old tripod
5. Konica Minolta Scan Dual IV scanner (3220 dpi) that I had previously for rolls of APC.
6. Canon wired remote ($20 on EBay)
7. Canon 100' remote extension ($20 on EBay)

I have not gone the wireless release route yet until, but I plan to activate the remote release (30" from and reasonably independant of the camera for vibration elimination) when it is convenient.

I have shot 35mm (400 ASA) test rolls and had them processed at a professional processeer and had the negatives scanned at normal resolution ($3- $10/roll) and at "high definition" ($19.98/roll). I also scanned the negatives on my own scanner.

The processing of the films seemed to be equivalent from the preocessors used (profesional and "drugstore"). Both had a quick 1 - 2 hour turn around (the "drugstore" is 3 blocks away and the professional is 2 miles away).

The scanning appeared to have differences. The cheap "drugstore" scans did not seem to be as good when viewed on screen. My home scanning (3220 dpi) seems about the same as the high definition at the professional (Agfa scanner). I learned to get the roll uncut, so I could cut it later if I chose to fit my scanner (6 per strip) instead of the standard (4 per strip).

My lightweight digital has 10x optical, but no remote release so I could not compare it with my Canon on remote shots. When used hand-held, the Canon gave superior results because of the ease of use, controls and weight that made it much more effective for telephoto action shots (kids 6:00 to 7:00 PM football).

I will continue to use my digital for casual shooting and field macro shooting (work). At times, the date imprint is necessary as is the photo information I cannot get from a scanned image.

In most fill instances, I will be shooting and dropping off my rolls at a "drugstore" from processing only. I will then view and scan the negatives to what is needed and store the negatives. If I have something I feel is absolutely necessary, I will probably spend the extra to see if the professional scanning is really worth it.

I was lucky I bought my scanner when I did. Since Konica Minolta has changed product emphasis, the demand for my particular scanner is up and the availability has decreased.

I will end up going 100% digital in the future, but I want an 8 - 13 MP real SLR camera at a reasonable price. What I have is OK for a year or two and the 8-12 MP body prices will come down quickly (8 MP are already dropping quickly).

It is a lot more fun taking real pictures and the cost and inconvenience of processing rolls is not as bad as what I thought and I do not print too much. I do my own work on photos using Corel Paint Shop. If I really need a high quality big print, I can always have that print elsewhere if my printing is not adequate. If I lived in a different place that did not the conveniences so close, I probably would not have tried this.

Dick
 
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