Film to Digital (not easy for me) HELP!

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Old 08-12-06, 05:36 AM
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Film to Digital (not easy for me) HELP!

Years ago I used to be into 35mm film photography, but I'm having a hard time making the switch to digital.

I can compose clean, clear pictures with the Digitalís, but that's about where it ends. With my 35mm film camera's I could easily control depth of field or make a waterfall look like cotton candy by adjusting the aperture ring and shutter speeds. But with my Digitalís it's not so easy because I have to scroll through different menu's to get to the aperture and shutter settings.

I know part of the problem is my equipment; I have a Fuji S-5000 and a Fuji A-340. The A-340 is more of a pocket type "Point and Shoot" camera and the S-5000 is supposed to allow the user some control, but I'm just not getting it!

One of my favorite ways to shoot with my 35mm camera was to put the program on aperture priority and then simply turn the aperture ring to control depth of field; the camera would adjust the shutter speed accordingly for proper exposure.

On my S-5000, I have to go through several menusí to set it up that way; and, because there's no aperture ring, the button controls are clumsy. By then, I've missed the shot!

Do the high end digital cameras use a ring on the lens to adjust the aperture or is it also done with menu's and buttons on the camera?

I'm so frustrated, I'm about to unpack all my 35mm film gear and put these digitals away in the back of my closet.....

Any tips would be greatly appreciated?
Thanks,
Phil
 
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Old 08-12-06, 11:42 AM
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Part of the problem is you are comparing a flim slr to a digital point and shoot. To get comparable control you neeed a digital slr. The canon brand is easy to change the aperature and/or shutter speed. Its not a ring, but a knob on the camera. Manual focusing is still done with a focusing ring on the lens.

Another issue is that unless you developed the film yourself, it had some processing done to it. The digital camera may or may not have it, but by shooting raw and using good photo software, you control all processing.
 
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Old 08-12-06, 03:36 PM
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Phil,

I see you are having the same angst over the film to digital conversion that I experienced.
Your S5000 is an updated version of my first digital, a Fuji 2800.
It was a very frustrating three years that I labored with the same problems as you.
When I shopped for a replacement a year and a half ago I knew what I needed and was able to get an advanced point and shoot that can do more than a film camera with minimal need to access the programming. What I was looking for was a camera with the most knobs and buttons..
The camera I wound up getting was a Nikon 8800 with a 10x zoom but there are several brand options in this category that make it difficult to choose.

Not sure if you are looking to replace your camera but if you do you will now know what is important to you.
Actually I just recently bought a Canon A610 5mp point and shoot for the wife and it has the shutter/aperature priority selector right on the dial.

Try my favorite, Steves Digicams for good reviews and info.
 
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