Scanners

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  #1  
Old 11-17-08, 06:44 AM
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Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 188
Scanners

Hi there,

We have hundreds of photos, and a sizeable amount of old negatives and slides to filter through, that we want to save to our computer and then copy on discs for distribution to family members.

Keeping a family budget in mind, we have been looking for a suitable scanner to do the job. Most the pictures are old photographs, but we still want the option of scanning from old negatives and slides. What would be ideal is a unit that can scan multiple photos on the scanner screen but file them separately into a folder on the computer.

We have identified several units but wanted to post here for any input before making a purchase.

Thanks for any ideas.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-17-08, 11:10 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,127
Scanners

I currently have 4 scanners that I use.

For normal work on newspaper articles, photos, etc. up to 8 1/2 x 11, I use my Canon (470?) color/BW printer/scanner/copier because it does a good job, is handy and easy to use. When I bought this, the scanner had a better resolution than many single use, dedicated scanners.

I also have an older HP 4600 that has a transparent top that can be laid on any item to scanned. It does a good job. This also allows scanning large documents (bigger photos, maps) and using a program to "stich" together many individual scans into a single large file to be enhanced or used. I think this also has a separate "plug-in" unit that is back lit for scanning negatives that other scanners may not handle due to the size. I have some problems with compatibility when other scanners are used, so I have to shut off all other scanners and restart before using it. - My HP computer and Canon scanner/printer are more compatible than my HP computer and HP 4600 scanner!

Scanning negatives and slides realy requires a means of providing a back light. I tried a couple of other HP scanners with this feature a few years ago and still have them because I am too lazy to go through the hoops to dispose of them conveniently. If you are thinking of scanning a lot of 35mm and similar slides and negatives, you should have a dedicated scanner that has the resolution and ability to make the scanning easier.

Because I have many, many old negatives and slides, I have a Konica/Minolta Dimage dual Scan IV (not made now) that will handle 35mm slides in a carrier, 35mm negative strips and the Advantix type cartidges that are unwound, scanned and rewound. Because I had about 300 of the cartridges, I bought the machine on EBay, planning to sell it, but will never sell it now.

I am into photography, genealogy and have about 6000 photos scanned in addition to a few thousand 35mmm slides and many Advantix cartridges. Because I get many old photos and negatives, it is necessary to have good software to bring them back to better than original condition. I use the Corel Paint Shop Pro X (previously Jasc) along with a cheap program for organizing and tagging shots with words for seaching and finding and dating.

Restoring old photos can be good entertainment, since it is satifying, but can be very time consuming. It is necessary if you get a lot of old, damaged, scrtched, torn and abused photos. I just finished restoring a large very old professional tinted photo of my great-grandfather taken about 1885-1890. It had water and coffee stains, rips, missing corners and was torn in half. I now have an 11 x14 that I had printed (by someone else) from my scanned restoration. When I recently looked at it, I found I could see the hairs inside my great-grandfather's nose. - Watch out about restoring since it can get addicting.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 11-17-08, 01:46 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 188
Thanks for the reply Concretemasonry, it was impressive and knowledgeable. But my question remains: What would be ideal is a unit that can scan multiple photos on the scanner screen but file them separately into a folder on the computer.

In otherwords, I don't want to scan one photo at a time.

Thx
 
  #4  
Old 11-17-08, 02:23 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,127
Scanners

Most scanner software will automatically crop if you scan individual photos. They usually also allow you to crop and cut into separate images, but in some cases you will have to rescan the entire layout you put on the glass. Usually, the scanner stores them in a file like "my scans" or one in a file they created. In either case, you can always then put into your folders, you have created to provide some organization. You can always rename an image/file to make it more meaningful or descriptive.

If you do not take the opportunity to improve the shots, you will eventually want to do so with a common program.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 11-18-08, 05:14 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Michigan
Posts: 977
Epson makes some good photo scanners. Check the link above.
I have an old V100--does a good job scanning 35 mm film...........
 
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