Lenses from 35mm to Digital

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  #1  
Old 10-02-11, 10:22 PM
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Lenses from 35mm to Digital

I have a Canon Rebel 2000 EOS - lenses 35-80 and 80-200. I would like to purchase the digital Rebel, and want to confirm that my lenses are compatible with the digital Canon model. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 10-03-11, 03:37 AM
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It is highly doubtful, but taking one of the lenses to a camera shop and asking to see if it would fit, would make your decision easier.
 
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Old 10-03-11, 04:50 AM
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Yes, they should work fine.

The older series lens were designated FD and will not work on digital cameras.
Your film Rebel would have an EF lens which is what is used on digital cameras.

The other designation for Canon digital lens is EF-S which is a line of less expensive lens that are used on the the more entry level Canon digital cameras.
The EF lens will work on any modern Canon camera, the EF-S lens will only work on smaller sensor Canon digital, they will not work on film cameras or full sensor professional digital cameras.

One thing to keep in mind is that consumer digital cameras have a sensor that is smaller than the area of 35mm film.
This means that the image for all lenses on a cropped sensor digital camera will not all fall on the sensor.
This gives you the effect of a higher focal length than what is stated on the lens.
Canon has a 1.6x ratio for it's APS-C sensors.
This would give you for example on a 100mm lens a field of view of a 160 mm lens, or a 80mm field of view on a 50 mm lens.
Keep this in mind if you have an option to purchase a lens with the camera.
A popular kit lens is an 18-55 mm zoom.
This would give you the equivalent field of view of a 28-88mm lens.

Smaller sensors are common to all consumer digital cameras.
Full frame sensors which are sensors that are the same size as 35mm film, can only be found on pro digital cameras that cost thousands for the body only.
 
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Old 10-03-11, 12:25 PM
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Ahh, good to learn something.
 
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Old 10-06-11, 10:25 PM
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GregH, thanks for that info. My lens are EF. Regarding the 1.6 ratio, the lens that come with the digital are still 1.6 ratio or my lens from my 35 mm? Thanks!
 
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Old 10-07-11, 04:38 AM
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Yes, all lenses are designed to have their image fit a sensor that is the same size as what 35mm film would be.
If you take any lens and put a smaller sensor in front of it not all of the image will be seen.

So, yes, your old lenses and new ones behave the same way.
Multiply the lens focal length by 1.6 to know what the field of view will be on any lens on a cropped sensor.
Your 35-80 will seem like a 45-128 and the 80-200 will behave as if it were a 128-320.

Sensor quality has come so far that there is not much of a downside to having this phenomenon.
There is an advantage and disadvantage to the crop effect.............people who tend to use more telephoto will see an apparent increase in their reach........a 500mm lens will seem like an 800!
The ones who are not so lucky are wide angle shooters.
What was common on film cameras was a 28mm wide angle, unfortunately this focal length becomes a 45mm equivalent lens.
I guess this is why a standard kit lens is an 18-55mm length.


What camera are you considering?
 
  #7  
Old 10-07-11, 06:52 AM
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The Canon EOS Rebel is running $530 and I paid $350+ for my 35mm. I am assuming that lens are not inter changable between brands, so that's why I was staying with the Canon. If one can interchange what camera do you suggest? Thanks
 
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Old 10-07-11, 10:54 AM
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You really cannot go wrong. They are all good camera bodies. I would look at the features and see which one is best for you.

The Rebel XS (1000D) is a good camera but if you've got the money I'd probably opt for the T1i. I like the focusing on it better.
 
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Old 10-07-11, 04:04 PM
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Yes, the XS is a pretty good camera and quite closely matches a film camera's features in that it is pretty basic.
Pilot is right in that you might do well to move up to one with a few more features.

I am not really sure what is available where you are but someone has the T3 kit for just over $500.00 and is a bit more advanced than the XS.
I didn't see the T1i listed as being available.
Someone has the T2i body only for just over $600.00 but you would do well to get a camera that comes with the 18-55.
 
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Old 10-17-11, 09:01 AM
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Smile Just wondering if you made the plunge?

A report on a film cameral EF lens on a digital would be great!
 
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Old 10-17-11, 11:01 AM
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Thanks for the follow up!! I checked out the T2i and T1i, however I also looked at the Nikon D3100 for $739 with 18-55, and liked the features, yet only if my lens will work. Draw back, I just bought a 79 MGB GT Convertable project car, so my camera shopping has been put on the back burner until I get my car completed!!
 
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Old 10-17-11, 11:57 AM
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I don't think you can go wrong with either Canon or Nikon and you might as well throw Sony into the mix. When you do finally get the MG on the road I'd consider selling the old gear and put the money to your digital choice. Places like KEH, Adorama and B&H all purchase used equipment.
 
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Old 10-19-11, 05:05 PM
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Dane, reckon they'd buy film cameras? I am sitting here stuck with 2 Minolta XE7 bodies, assortments of lenses, filters, flash, etc. Tried Ebay, but got laughed off. And, I ain't givin' em away.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 04:54 AM
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They bought my old film gear but a few pieces didn't bring much and honestly I have to agree. I even sent them my gear that KEH did not offer to buy so they could use for spare parts.

They had been sitting in my closet for 10+ years without being used so it was time to get rid of them. Sort of like that old 486 computer hiding in the corner. Yea, it cost a fortune when new, now it's only value is as scrap and it's still 20 or more years away from any chance of being collectible.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 02:58 PM
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And, I ain't givin' em away.
My view on this is that if it has no cash value at all I would prefer to give this equipment away to someone who would actually use and learn from it.
The alternative is to continue to hoard it until an ancestor has to deal with it.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 04:40 PM
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Good point, Greg. I could give it to a tax deductible charity and realize more than if I sold it probably. Thanks. Didn't mean to hijack the thread.
 
  #17  
Old 10-20-11, 06:48 PM
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Not a problem.

I not too long ago sold a complete b&w darkroom to a young fellow who was planning to get into photography as a vocation for the grand sum of $250.00!
I paid that for the enlarger lens.
I gave him the run down on the basics of simple developing and printing and I don't think he ever took the equipment out of the boxes.

I'm not exactly sure what the lesson is in this but at least I had a warm fuzzy feeling while he was loading the stuff in his car and I'm not storing the stuff myself.
 
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Old 10-21-11, 04:13 PM
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Now the hard part is finding someone that will use and learn from a 35 year old film camera and have fun explaining what "film" is.
 
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