Blurry Video Stills

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  #1  
Old 04-21-15, 05:45 AM
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Blurry Video Stills

I'm using a Sony PJ760 Camcorder. I usually record with 60i, 30fps,
on auto focus and auto settings. When I play the video back on my computer and try to capture stills, I find that most of the frames are way too blurry for my liking and it hurts my eyes.

I tried playing around with 24p, and adjusting the shutter speed also (1/180, 1/250, 1/400 etc).

I found that in playback of videos shot in 1/250 or 1/400 shutter speed, the stills were much more focused and clearer BUT I noticed the quality was degraded. There was a lot more noise and grainy speckles in each still.

So I guess what I'm looking for is what is the best/optimum settings where I can record a high quality video AND less motion blur in frame by frame playback?

I tried 24p and shutter speed of 1/388 and 1/250 and they seemed to capture non-blurry stills but the picture quality was not as clear/sharp as 60i under auto settings, but 60i auto was mostly motion blur in frame by frame stills.

BTW, this is for indoor shooting with mostly indoor lighting. Thanks for any suggestions and tips.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 06:11 AM
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What you are running into is video. It's also why photography taking single pictures is still used to produce the best still images. Video is good at capturing motion but is quite poor at producing single images.

A faster shutter speed will reduce blurring due to motion but it allows less light into the sensor which is probably automatically turning up the gain (ISO) to try and get the proper exposure. This is why movies are often filmed with a lot of light and use big lenses. Shooting indoors with reduced light makes everything worse.

Since we haven't seen your videos it's difficult to say what to do other than you'll just have to try settings until you find the best for your usage. More light will help. So would mounting the camera on a tripod to minimize it's motion. Many things in photography are a trade off. Shutter speed, aperture and ISO are all tied together. Change one and it affects the others.
 
  #3  
Old 04-21-15, 06:34 AM
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thanks, I appreciate that information. Yes, I guess you are right about the trade offs. I guess I just need to find the best balance between a good enough shutter speed but still making for some good quality stills.

I'm not sure if it's just me or does recording in 24p actually seem to produce less motion blur stills than 60i (30fps) mode? Am I right? I'm pretty sure that's what I'm seeing.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 07:57 AM
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Progressive is a full frame grab. So, 24p is taking 24 full pictures every second. Progressive is more similar to a DSLR cranking off full image pictures as fast as it can to create a movie.

Interlaced is not a full frame but goes back to old CRT TV's how the picture was drawn as a series of lines. Each "image" is created in two passes. The first pass does the odd numbered lines and the second pass does the even numbered ones. So, when recording in interlaced mode there is a slight time difference between the first and second passes used to create one image which is bad if your subject is moving. So, I would only record in interlaced mode if you're going to output to a old style picture tube type TV.

Best would be to record in progressive mode if outputting to a computer or modern flat screen. That way you're capturing full images. Then decide how many frames per second is best for you. The slower the rate the more time the camera has for each image which is generally better for low light situations. Higher frame rates are better for fast moving things to avoid motion blur but it requires more light.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 05:04 PM
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thanks for the explanation!
 
  #6  
Old 05-01-15, 09:44 AM
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just a little update:

after playing around with some settings, so far I found 24p at 192 shutter speed has turned out to be the best setting. I can now view my video frame by frame and 9/10 frames almost always clear with no "ghosting" effect.
 
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