Camera for pictures of gardens

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Old 07-23-20, 03:28 PM
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Camera for pictures of gardens

I'm trying to find a camera that will take magazine quality photos of gardens. More specifically, I'd like to capture 30 horizontal feet or so without having to be standing so far away that the detail is sacrificed. I assume this is a function of something like focal length or depth of field or whatever. My pocket camera just doesn't do it well at all. I'll attach examples of what I have in mind. I assume it is more a matter of the lens than the camera body. I'm wondering where to start in choosing the camera and lens. It will need to be digital and moderately-priced.


 

Last edited by GaryMN; 07-23-20 at 03:50 PM.
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Old 07-24-20, 07:19 AM
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If your camera has a "panorama" setting you could use that. My Panasonic Lumix DMC-LF1 has that setting. You pan the camera across the area like a video and it creates a digital snapshot. Here are two examples shot from the same place.



Standard shot

Panorama shot

Of course the picture sizes will be different. Also there may be some "fisheye" effect. The railing in the bottom shot does not bend but appears to be angled.
 

Last edited by 2john02458; 07-24-20 at 07:20 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 07-24-20, 09:31 AM
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What is your budget?

It sounds like you want as much wide angle as possible. In that case you want the smallest zoom number you can get. For example a zoom lens camera with a range of 20-200mm would be better for you than 24-200mm. When you get to wide angle even a few mm difference can be significant which is not the case at the long zoom end.

As for getting magazine quality out of all in one camera I would look at these features. A big sensor would be one of my first criteria. The next will be the quality of the lens. Third would be the pixel count.

If going for a removable lens camera my #1 criteria by a long shot is a quality lens. For example with Canon you put a photo taken through a consumer lens next to one taken with an L series lens and the difference is very noticeable. Next would be the sensor size and last would be the number of megapixels.
 
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Old 07-28-20, 04:27 PM
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How should I compare these?

Canon - EOS Rebel T6 DSLR Two Lens Kit with EF-S 18-55mm IS II and EF 75-300mm III lens - Black

Canon - EOS Rebel T7 DSLR Video Two Lens Kit with EF-S 18-55mm and EF 75-300mm Lenses

Nikon - D3500 DSLR Video Two Lens Kit with AF-P DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR & AF-P DX NIKKOR 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3G ED - Black
 
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Old 07-29-20, 05:14 AM
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How should I compare these?
That is a VERY open ended question. Can you be more specific?

You stated you wanted wide angle performance and magazine like quality. All you have listed are consumer grade so the images from all three will be a step below anything using a professional level lens. As for wide angle they all have 18mm at the wide end so they are basically equal in that respect. 18mm isn't very wide angle so you'll have to step back further from your subject to get it all in one frame. To help differentiate you can look at the maximum aperture capability of the lenses (you didn't provide for the Canon's). A smaller number, larger aperture is generally better.

I would avoid relying on a panorama feature if you with magazine quality especially if relying on the camera to stitch the image. A camera's processor can only do so much to combine a series of complex images into one without some level of distortion. Better would be to take individual photos and stitch them together later with good photo editing software which will allow you more control over how the images are combined.

I would not sweat the difference in specs between the three camera bodies. They will all take great pictures so it will come down to price and what features tickle your fancy. It may help if you hold each camera in your hand and see which feels best and has the control buttons and knobs where you intuitively feel for them. Also look for any particular feature that one has that the others don't.
 
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Old 07-29-20, 07:27 AM
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has the control buttons and knobs where you intuitively feel for them
This can be more important than you realize. Although I love my Panasonic the ON-OFF button is right next to the shutter button and I have inadvertently turned off the camera many times instead of shooting a picture. I eventually found a solution in a suggestion about glueing a small O ring around the ON-OFF button. That has given me enough of an obstacle/clue to avoid pressing the wrong one.
 
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