Advice for RV renovation

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  #1  
Old 08-05-05, 11:47 PM
janeshome
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Question Advice for RV renovation

I am renovating the interior of my motorhome and need some advice. Due to water damage I have to replace the wood panels on my wall. Can I purchase wood paneling from my home improvement store? What type of adhesive? There is a foam (blue colored) product in between the studs of the wall. Also, any forseable problems using tile on my kitchen backsplash (in the RV)? Help!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-06-05, 01:05 PM
jeffstevens
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Originally Posted by janeshome
I am renovating the interior of my motorhome and need some advice. Due to water damage I have to replace the wood panels on my wall. Can I purchase wood paneling from my home improvement store? What type of adhesive? There is a foam (blue colored) product in between the studs of the wall. Also, any forseable problems using tile on my kitchen backsplash (in the RV)? Help!
I would use an adhesive for tub and shower, also you can get all your paneling from any lumber yard. The blue foam you found would be a type of insulation. You may run into a problem with the tile, the grout may crack up, it depends on what type you go with.
I hope this helps
 
  #3  
Old 08-08-05, 05:25 PM
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The paneling used in rv's is the same stuff as what you get at your local home improvement store or lumber yard. Just different patterns.
I would call the motorhome manufacturer and find out what type of glue they used in laminating the wall. You should be able to go through customer service and find out. I would then Use the same type if not the same glue. Some use contact, some urethane, ect. The Blue foam is your insulation. If it is too badly dammaged it will need replaced. the good news is that it is the same stuff as what you get at your home improvement store or lumber yard, just get it in the same thickness. The type of gule used will determine what pitfalls to beware of.
The contact stuff is hard to work with in the fact that it is unforgiving once it touches its stuck and is almost, if not impossible to adjust without dammaging the panel or wall. The liquid urethane stuff makes an awful mess and carefull masking and surface protection is a must. When you think you have masked off enough do twice that much then you should be ok. The stuff will ooze out of gaps and cracks and get everywhere, you must also be carefull not to use too much or it will bulge out behind the panels. The easiest stuff to use comes in tubes or sausages kinda like silcone. I only know of it by the brand name sikaflex. It is a urethane type glue that you need to heat the tubes to make it workable instead of a liquid urethane. run it on in beads and set the panel. the only thing is that the stuff that is not contact glue generally needs to be pressed to the wall for a while. sometimes hours. you can use a plywood sheet and some 2x4's to hold it in place. just mock up everything dry before adding glue no matter what type you use.
As far as tile goes I have seen it used in lots of RV's. just make sure to use a good quality mortar. and then a good quality flexable grout mix. Do the best surface prep you can. There are epoxy grouts that work well in the rv enviorment. Remember that the motar and the grout are not the same stuff. Some places and some manufacturers seem to think that such is the case but this will generally not work well in an rv. The motar and grout is no place to skimp on the job. It will show up in the results later. You might want to think about setting the tile and grouting between them, but usuing a thin line of silicone between the counter top and the tile backsplash. this will help to eliminate cracking due to movement between the top and the backsplash.
 
  #4  
Old 08-10-05, 10:40 AM
janeshome
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Thanks Jeffstevens and Hapdad I can now get started, I am redoing the entire interior of my RV and am sure I will be posting more questions. FYI, I found an add-mix for my mortar and grout that is supposed to add flexibility for applications where vibrations are a concern. I ordered the product and am going to try it, I'll let you know if it works out okay. Thanks again for the advice!
 
  #5  
Old 08-10-05, 07:56 PM
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The entire interior? Wow that is alot of work. Been there done that. This may sound elementry, but as you take things apart put the screws and hardware in plastic cups or bags or something and lable where it came from. Even if you plan on usuing new fastners, this will keep things organized and give you a refrence for how long of screw to use if you are replacing. Also alot of MFG's like to "back screw" stuff. If you take out all the screws you can find and the thing is still held fast to the wall it may be back screwed. This means running screws into say a cleat for a overhead cabinet from inside an adjacent wall. Then proceeding to panel off the wall. And hide the screw.
Make youself as detailed a drawing as you can. it will be worth its weight in gold later. Mark the location of wiring comming through the paneling you will replace with tape and measurements written on the tape. An example would be to place a peice of 2" masking tape on the cieling inline with the wires for a light and off to one side in line with the wires and then mark arrows with measurements. This is a good back up to just a drawing. You can then locate where to drill holes while dry fitting.
All at once or in sections is up to you. Stuff does tend to get lost or broken and you tend to forget where stuff came from when the job takes too long between disassemble and reassemble. A video of before during and after disassembly might also help.
Before you start disconnecting wires get some wire markers. Numberd, letterd what ever floats your boat. just make sure you understand your system and you dont scrape off the markers pulling wires through holes in cabinets ect. just in case you don't know what wire markers are the ones I use are Numberd. like little rolls of tape with a series of 0's on one roll 1's on the next ect. Just wrap the wire on one side of say a wire nut with say a 0 then wrap the wire on the other side of the nut with the same numer and remove the wire nut and viola! its easy to see that the 2 wires belong together. I match 0 to 0 and 1 to 1 ect. Some people use masking tape and write on it themselves but I personally think it is too easy for the writting or the large masking tape to get messed up. Whatever works for you makeing sure you can get the wires back where they came from is the improtant thing.
You might want to mark you plumbing lines the same way. Checking later to be certain you haven't mixed up cold and hot will save you a scaled hand or worse later. Thats about all I can think of at the moment off the top of my head. Hope this helps.
 
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