Pop-up Celing

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  #1  
Old 02-05-08, 10:52 AM
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Pop-up Celing

I purchased a 1994 Rockwood Pop-up for $100 (boss wanted it out of his yard). Its in pretty good shape. The drivers side seem from roof to side is shot, also the crank roof vent. I have it popped up, and ripped down most all of the celing to the Styrofoam panels. My question is what should I use in place of the rotten wood I pulled out, and what should I use as panel? Should I fill the gaps w/ foam insulation? Thanks in advance.
*Yooper*
 
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  #2  
Old 02-06-08, 04:17 PM
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Driver side seam from roof to side is shot ? I'm sorry, you lost me a bit there. Material?
Your other post Re: canvas, Have you tried a camping/outdoors, hardware store? We had a canvas repair place less than a mile from us, so we never really tried any kits or anything, sorry.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-08, 11:34 AM
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Update

In my head it made sense, but I get that a lot (that I don't explain things very well). The roof where it comes to a 90 degree angle is leaking (from the top roof to the side of the pop-up top shell, and also the vent on the top (most of culprit). Previous owner tried to fix it, but did not do a very good job. Inside I've ripped half the ceiling down to where it is just Styrofoam. I realize now that the cheap rotten wood I've ripped out in between the Styrofoam is there for stability and support. I'm going to replace w/ a nice sturdy hardwood.

My only question now is what type of material should i put up to create a nice ceiling? Should I go with a very smooth thin paneling that I can paint white before I hang?
 
  #4  
Old 02-08-08, 03:25 AM
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You should have a molding along the edge that your describing, after you remove the vinyl/rubber insert covering the screws, remove the screws & moldings and you can re-putty them, and then seal with good sealant (not silicone) along the edges. Make sure you seal the heads of the screws either before or after re-install, for added protection from moisture. once molding and putty are removed, clean surfaces thoroughly before re-assemble, and inspect plywood underneath for rot also. As far as ceiling panels go, they are usually just mahogoney, or Luan panels with wallpaper glued on, but can be purchased as one, from an RV dealer, or perhaps a plywood specialty store. The surface usually is of a water reisitant type of fabric, (vinyl) for obvious reasons. If you have an RV place near you, it might be your best bet, for all the materials & sealants you need. Make sure when you re-adhere ceiling panels, you use an adhesive that is good for styrofoam applications, like PL 300 or a similar spray type. Have some 2x4's, or whatever ready to support it when glued.
 
  #5  
Old 02-12-08, 08:30 AM
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Plywood under the roof

Thanks for the advise Mike. I've got the entire celling ripped down to the Styrofoam. I looked at the outside roof and see the seam you are talking about removing. It appears that the plywood on at least the drivers side and the front are in bad shape. Once I remove the screws holding the molding on, what is the next course of action? It looks fairly easy to fabricate a piece of plywood or chip-board to replace the ones that are rotted out. I don't want to get in over my head. The more I look the more work I find. However there is no point in making a nice celling only to have it get ruined in a year. Thanks for all who lend a hand with this matter. Think spring! Its a terrible ice storm today...
 
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Old 02-16-08, 07:38 AM
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OOPs! Been real busy, for got to check, sorry!
Anyway, you are right, it is fairly simple to replace those side panels if they are rotted too badly, but then again, it depends on how ambitious you are I guess. Sometimes a good indication, is how well the new screws bite in to the current wood. If old screws still in good shape you can re-use, but usually with moisture, the threads rust right off, if it's bad enough. If they will bite in and hold fairly well, maybe it's better off left alone, and just re-seal everything good on re-install of the molding. With molding off, you should be able to determine how bad the top edge & side is rotted, and proceed or not from there. If you decide to rebuild & If you have the room, it would be better to remove the attaching bolts from your upright supports, disconnect any wiring & remove it, and set it on a couple of sawhorses or similar that will hold the weight. This will make it easier for both jobs, as you can flip it over, and do your ceiling too. If you do remove it, simply put a long 2x6 or something similar, from horse to horse, extended out enough that you can set cap ends on it, and makes it easier for side removal. Take all your moldings off, and if you don't think the side will come off in one piece, for tracing later, then use a large sheet of paper, and make a cut-out, if needed, otherwise, a sheet of plywood or particle board cut to proper length & height,(at highest point) in a rectangular shape, can easily be trimmed along top edge later, with a saws-all or jig saw. The skin you remove, may be all you need as far as a template for new wood side. Be sure to take a few height measurements along various areas of the roof edge from side, to insure it's not put back together with a sag in the roof, before you disassemble. Don't be afraid to make a drawing before disassembly, of everything you want to remember, such as bolt hole location. I'd use a little construction adhesive between top & side & ends,as well as the screws, for added strength. Be sure when your replacing your ceiling panels you use an adhesive that is compatible with styrofoam, like PL300 or whatever your supply store recommends. (read label on can or tube) You'll need to re-adhere skin to plywood so allow enough adhesive for that too. Seeing how this is getting pretty long,Get back to me with what you decide to do, and I'll give you a few tips before re-assembly.
 
  #7  
Old 02-17-08, 05:50 PM
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Entire top is disassembled.

After some help with a friend we have decided to build a new roof. Why spend a lot of time making a nice celling if the wood is all rotted and weak. All the chipboard has been removed, and I need one 48" x 9 or 10 feet long and I will cut all four pieces and stencil in. The sides have a bow shape at top, but the chip board in front and back appears to be a stright rectangle?

You are right, I'm kinda kicking myself for not taking a few pictures before disassesmbly. I will mark the holes for brackets that attach to raising mechanism. My main Question now is where do I find the right size lumber that goes all around the perimeter and additional air conditioner center supports. It actually measures 1"x1.5". I don't really see this size anywhere. My next try will be RV place or custom lumber store.

Thanks for all the help! Now I have a heads up on the adhesvie for celling panel (I'm thinking of using this white panel basically a whiteboard). What do I use to attach main support to fiberglass?
 
  #8  
Old 02-18-08, 06:45 AM
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Been a while since I worked on a Rockwood HT , so bear with me here. As far as the lumber goes, when/if right size not available, we used to rip down 2x2s to proper size on a table saw, or even 2x4s ripped at 1" fence setting. When you say "attach main support to fiberglass" I'm assuming where they attach at the sides. Your fiberglass skin on the outside, is laminated (glued) to your plywood/particle board, and will need to be removed, cleaned off & re-adhered to new plywood, or whatever you use. Those brackets just bolt through don't they? If you plan on keeping this unit for a while, check out the difference in price between regular plywood & marine plywood. If not too much difference, marine will hold up & last longer, but if expensive in your area, don't worry about it, just use regular. If you want to shoot me a couple of digitals of what your up against, it would help jog my memory. As far as adhesive go, we always used Lepage products, (http://www.lepageproducts.com/produc...y.asp?catID=22 ) but 3M has some good adhesives too. ( http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3...beSC2785KN7Pgl ) Your local homedepot or lowes should have what you need.
 
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