Flooded Park Model Trailer - Can it be saved?

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  #1  
Old 06-12-08, 09:15 PM
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Flooded Park Model Trailer - Can it be saved?

We just lost our fight with the river in Wisconsin. The water is knee high inside our 39' park model. We have insurance and am wondering if the trailer could be renovated. We bought it in 2003 and it cost $40,000. It's book value now is only $25,000. and I'm sure the insurance will give us much less. Does anyone here know if it could be saved? Only water damage. The outside of it looks fine. Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-12-08, 10:37 PM
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If you want to do what you want to do and have explored the history of floods there, then you can accept the insurance as stipulated in the policy. You may also want to know that if you have FEMA, it pays one time if you have that insurance. You need to read house insurance and flood insurance policies, paying particular attention to fine print.

Can the property be renovated? Yes, you can strip it down to bare bones and start from there.
 
  #3  
Old 06-13-08, 06:14 AM
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Thank you for your reply. Any ideas on where to start?
 
  #4  
Old 06-13-08, 12:02 PM
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You start by cleaning out all mud and debris. You rip out all floor coverings. You rip out wallboard and insulation and clean out all mud. You remove covering beneath the unit and all insulation and clean out mud and debris. Everything must be opened up and dried out and all flood damaged materials removed. All cavities must be opened up and cleaned out and allowed to dry out. Depending on temperature and humidity, it can take several weeks to several months for the unit to dry out. Dehumidifiers and fans can expedite the drying process. A moisture meter can help you determine if wood products have dried out enough. 15% or less is usually good. If 20% or greater, there can be decay.

You may have to hose out the home to get mud out of cavities. Removing all mud and debris and cleaning and disinfecting surfaces with bleach/water solution can eliminate odors and mold/mildew.

Here's a good link with lots of links to helpful info: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Dis...very/flood.htm
 
  #5  
Old 06-13-08, 05:53 PM
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Thanks. The link you provided is very helpful. Now we just have to wait for it to stop raining!
 
  #6  
Old 06-13-08, 06:38 PM
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I'm assuming your park model has metal siding ? The reason I ask is because if it has laminated sides (filon or fiberglass) then you will have styrofoam insulation, which won't absorb water like pink or yellow fiberglass in the walls. Get that de-humidifier going a.s.a.p. and open up all the cupboards etc, & covers that you can find. If you have siding, and can get, it inside, maybe rather than rip out the walls, cupboards etc., remove the siding and work from the outside- in. Once all the siding is off, insulation etc can be removed, without disturbing too much of the internal wiring. You'll also get a good look at the back of your wall panels etc, and decide which ones are beyond repair, or can be saved. Good luck, keep us posted. Believe it or not, it will probably be a whole lot less/easier work to do it from outside-in.
 
  #7  
Old 06-14-08, 04:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike.B View Post
I'm assuming your park model has metal siding ? The reason I ask is because if it has laminated sides (filon or fiberglass) then you will have styrofoam insulation, which won't absorb water like pink or yellow fiberglass in the walls. Get that de-humidifier going a.s.a.p. and open up all the cupboards etc, & covers that you can find. If you have siding, and can get, it inside, maybe rather than rip out the walls, cupboards etc., remove the siding and work from the outside- in. Once all the siding is off, insulation etc can be removed, without disturbing too much of the internal wiring. You'll also get a good look at the back of your wall panels etc, and decide which ones are beyond repair, or can be saved. Good luck, keep us posted. Believe it or not, it will probably be a whole lot less/easier work to do it from outside-in.
I guess the whole procedure will depend on how long it was full of water. Somehow I missed the part about knee high , ouch! Most, if not all manufacturers use particle board as a core for the cupboards etc, and once they've been in water for any amount of time, they usually start to swell & crack/separate. I guess the good news is, anything higher should be able to be saved.
 
  #8  
Old 06-18-08, 08:27 AM
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Well, the trailer has been knee high in water for 8 days now. The river finally crested yesterday (over the kitchen counters) and is finally going down slowly. The water won't recede enough to start working on it until next week. That's if we don't get anymore rain! So, I figure it will have been under water for 2 weeks. Can it still be salvaged? I am thinking the wood frame will soak up the water and warp. We looked in the trailer yesterday and the kitchen cabinets are coming apart. After looking at prices on the internet I can see I am under-insured. A new trailer like this one would cost $55,000. So, I'm going to have to find a way to fix it. After I get in there and start tearing things up, I'll send an update.
 
  #9  
Old 06-22-08, 04:28 PM
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It's been a long weekend. We visited the trailer park and found out that the insurance companies are not paying. We purchased flood insurance for our "park model" and now, after reading the fine print, it looks like it doesn't cover "park trailers". Don't you think the guy that sold us this should have known it? It covers almost every other kind of trailer but ours. The trailer is still sitting in water after 2 weeks. FEMA has declared every county in southeastern WI but ours a disaster area. The park won't pay for cleanup. Could this get any worse??? Not expecting any replies, just rambling.
 
  #10  
Old 06-23-08, 05:05 AM
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Is your park trailer the only thing you had covered with the flood insurance? If so you might be able to take action against the insurance agent although I doubt you would get much more than a reimbursement of your premiums.
 
  #11  
Old 06-28-08, 07:16 PM
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Well, today we finally got back inside the trailer. It was a real mess inside. The good news is the walls and the underflooring look really good. Since the trailer has a double loft, it's too big to move inside a garage. So, I think I'll have to work from the inside. First I plan on taking everything wet out of there. That includes the kitchen cabinets which were ruined, plus the appliances (I don't think they can be saved), and flooring. I plan on cutting about 1 foot above the flood line on the walls and taking them off. Then removing the insulation as far as I see water marks, etc. After that, I plan on powerwashing the entire inside and getting a dehumidifier going with fans all over it. Getting to the inside of the flooring will be the biggest challenge. I believe it is completely sealed with insulation on the inside. Still, it really didn't look as bad as I expected. Any advice, let me know.
 
  #12  
Old 06-28-08, 08:19 PM
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same situation

I dont suppose that you are on the Crawfish. Well I feel you pain. I also have a park model that had 6" in the bedroom and 3" in the living room. We got in there last weekend and the mosquitos had taken over. I hate to burden you with a question but I am truley concerned about the issue. Our policy state that our MANUFACTURED HOME is covered. Is this good or bad. And does anyone know with the amount of water in the trailer (and seeping up the walls over a foot and a half) will it be considered totaled (I was foolish and purchased a new trailer thinking mine was done). Also does anyone know the percentage of coverage it takes for it to be considered totaled.

I went to a friends trailer today and they had mold growing EVERYWHERE. Be very care to get all mold out. They recommend that it is done professionally.

Best wishes, I hope all works out for you.
 
  #13  
Old 06-28-08, 09:19 PM
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For insurance purposes, the term "manufactured home" does not include park trailers, travel trailers and other similar vehicles.

If insurance company deems that costs of repairs exceed the cash value of the home, then it is considered totaled. Your insurance company will have to inspect and appraise the damage. Ideally one should have enough insurance to cover replacement.
 
  #14  
Old 06-28-08, 09:29 PM
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Thanks for your quick response, so you think I will be denied. My problem with that is that the company that sold us the trailer also issued the insurance policy. How could they screw that up, do I have recourse. Thanks for the help.
 
  #15  
Old 06-28-08, 10:25 PM
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If you have a manufactured home and meet the following definition of a building, then the flood insurance should cover the damage.

FEMA flood insurance makes the following clarification: "Building" means a structure with two or more outside rigid walls and a fully secured roof that is affixed to a permanent site; or a manufactured home (also known as a mobile home, which is a structure built on a permanent chassis, transported to its site in one or more sections, and affixed to a permanent foundation); or a travel trailer without wheels, built on a chassis, and affixed to a permanent foundation that is regulated under the community's floodplain management and building ordinances or laws. Building does not mean a recreational vehicle, park trailer, or similar vehicle, except as described above."

http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache...lnk&cd=5&gl=us
 
  #16  
Old 06-28-08, 10:35 PM
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I have wheels and only sit on a gravel pad. So I am SOL.
 
  #17  
Old 07-03-08, 07:28 AM
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Hello Dstetler!
I am on the Crawfish River. My unit still has water in it! We are hoping to go this weekend and start cleanup. My insurance adjuster is not saying one way or another if it will be covered. The NFIP will decide. But, I would think the people that sold you the trailer and insurance would also be liable. I took pictures to our insurance agent last October and told him I thought it was a "recreational vehicle" not a "mobilehome". He still argued it with me, swore an oath that it was covered, so I went home. Even the Jefferson County Zoning Ordinance says we are not allowed to have a "park model" trailer in the floodplain. I don't know how so many people (park management, county management, insurance companies, and NFIP) could ignore what was going on in these parks. We figure they sold us the policy, we thought we were insured, and somebody should pay!
 
  #18  
Old 07-03-08, 09:00 PM
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I have to agree with you guys, if someone sold me a trailer & an insurance policy, then I find out its not covered, I would make his place of business my new parking space for my uninsured trailer that was ruined, and write the name of the insurance company who took my money & refused to cover it, all over the side of it. I'd be their biggest advertiser until they paid. Maybe you guys should all get together and call a local news channel. or paper. Make sure you let them know they have one more chance to make it right, otherwise, the advertisement they get on your behalf, won't be exactly what they would prefer. "GOOD LUCK" keep us posted.
p.s. don't forget to mention all the RV internet forums that you will be contacting as well. Either the dealer will have to pressure the insurance company, or the insurance company will have to pressure the dealer, to make it right.
 
  #19  
Old 07-06-08, 07:49 PM
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I finally got to tear the trailer apart. What a mess! The good news is we took down everything beneath the chair rail and it wasn't too bad. The insulation was really wet. I don't think it would have dried for months. The cabinets in the kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom were worthless. We tore them apart and threw the whole mess away. They were already covered in mold so the place was starting to smell. We did wear protective coverings so we didn't ruin our health in the process. I was surprised how they put the trailer together. Everything was built in. The flooring was the first thing they put in, then the walls and everything else! We have plank flooring and it's under every wall. Instead of pulling it out from under the walls, I just cut it off at the wall. So, we now are wondering about the subfloor. It looks fine, but I know there is insulation sandwiched between the plywood. My new question is, do we leave the floor alone, or will the smelly mold make it's way throughout the trailer. It smells pretty good right now, so we are thinking about it for now. We haven't heard about the insurance yet, but so far it hasn't cost us anything but our time.
 
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