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black mold


dstetler's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2008
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WI

07-10-08, 11:04 PM   #1  
black mold

Hello, first timer, I have a trailer in a campground with 400 other trailers. We recently were flooded, and approx. 300 trailers were flooded inside. I recently brought in a new trailer, but most people are trying to fix there trailers. A salvage guy came around 3 weeks later and said that the black mold in the trailers that had been there will never go away and that it is airbourne and will contaminate my trailer that is next to an old one. He then said it will grow and my trailer will show rotting with in 2 years. And that there are health concerns from the spores that are out side. His suggestion is that we take all the affected trailors out of the park (there are 300 hundred affected trailers.) Is the ventalation outside not enough to dilute the spores? My guess is that this guy is partially right but I think that he is exagerating and trying to make a quick buck. Can anyone give me some honest advice. The people in the park can not afford to have their trailers all taken out. Should I worry about my two children when they go up there to play in three weeks? Anything would be helpful. Thanks Dave.

 
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Mike.B's Avatar
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CANADA

07-11-08, 04:15 AM   #2  
Here's a link you may want to check out. (http://www.handycanadian.com/article...ld-removal.asp )
Yes I have to agree that maybe this guy is putting everyone into a panic & looking for a quick buck. When I run into this problem, I soak the mold down with a solution of approximately 70% white table vinegar, 30% water, (which is what I've been informed kills mold better than bleach etc.) wait for it to dry completely, then apply a couple of coats of "B.I.N. by Zinser, which is a primer sealer, to seal in anything that may remain. I'm talking the framing in behind wall panels etc, that you don't see. As far as the wall panels etc, that are out in the open, I'd rip them out & replace them, as well as any trim that shows sign of same. You'll want to get them off and check insulation in behind anyway, if they are showing signs of delamination. (bubbling, splitting, peeling & separating). You should be able to smell the musty, moldy smell as soon as you enter, and if you do, it's wise to locate the source & eliminate it.

 
twelvepole's Avatar
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07-11-08, 08:00 AM   #3  
Mold spores are everywhere in the air. Once they find a damp, poorly ventilated, soiled surface, they tend to settle in. Surfaces that remain damp or wet 24-48 hours are prime targets. Once mold settles in, depending on type of mold, it can present itself in a variety of colors, including black. Just because you see a mold that is black, does not mean that it is BLACK MOLD This is the dreaded, toxic black mold known as Stachybotrys. The only way to rule out Stacybotrys is to have a mold test done.

You can not eye ball mold sand declare it toxic Stachybotrys without a test. A salvage guy can not either.

"The black mold in the trailers that had been there will never go away and that it is airbourne and will contaminate my trailer that is next to an old one. He then said it will grow and my trailer will show rotting with in 2 years. And that there are health concerns from the spores that are out side."

-There has been no test done to confirm Stachybotrys.
-Mold spores are airborne and are everywhere.
-Mold spores will not settle into your new trailer if you monitor moisture and humidity conditions and take steps to control those.
-Health concerns re: mold spores in the air are especially problems for those with allergies and respiratory problems. For instance, many have problems in the fall with leaf mold. Mold spores are everywhere in the air. Not all are toxic. Without laboratory testing of air quality inside the home, there is no way to know what type(s) of mold spores exist. http://www.essortment.com/all/whatisblackmo_rfls.htm

Links to recommendations for flood cleanup: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Dis...very/flood.htm

Consumers are warned about salvage scams after floods and hurricanes. Although nonpermanent structures such as trailers tend not to be covered by flood insurance, many owners do carry travel trailer insurance. The insurance company would have to declare the trailer as salvage, not the salvage guy.

If concerned about children and mold in trailers, limit children to the outdoors and keep them out of flooded trailers as an extra precaution. It is indoor air quality that is of concern. In your trailer,
Keep humidity level in house between 40% and 60%.
Use air conditioner or a dehumidifier during humid months.
Be sure the home has adequate ventilation, including exhaust fans in kitchen and bathrooms.
http://www.cdc.gov/MOLD/stachy.htm#sum

 
Mike.B's Avatar
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07-11-08, 04:36 PM   #4  
Adding to my previous posting, over the years I have seen many a trailer with water damage and mold in behind interior & exterior panels, that no one was aware of, nor was there any reason to suspect it because everyone was just fine, healthwise. Probably the best thing you can use to detect it, is your sniffer (nose). It has it's own distinct smell as I am sure you are aware. Like the article twelvepole posted, keep the air inside dry by running your A/C, and if not possible, concentrate a fan on the dampened area through the day when your not in it too much, and dry it out. Once you have it dried out completely, and have eliminated any more moisture entering, then decide what areas need your attention the most. If you have knowledge of someone with allergies to it, would be smart to forwarn them just in case. Don't forget to open cupboard doors etc, and allow air to circulate & dry it out in there too.

 
fab44's Avatar
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NY

07-12-08, 06:51 AM   #5  
Mold

I have a similar problem but not as potentially serious. I have mold on the canvas roof of my gazebo, any ideas on how to remove it? Bleach is not an option because of the colour issues.

 
twelvepole's Avatar
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07-12-08, 07:34 AM   #6  
Mildew stains on fabric are next to impossible to remove. At best, you can expect to lighten them. Scrub the canvas as usual and rinse. Apply enzyme digester cleaner. Keep affected areas moist with the enzymes which should digest the mold/mildew. Stains tend to remain. Enzyme cleaners are marketed under a variety of names such as Out, OdoBan, Nature's Miracle, and others.

 
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