Butt Ugly Blue Fiberglass Cap

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  #1  
Old 10-12-09, 10:08 AM
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Butt Ugly Blue Fiberglass Cap

I got a fiberglass cap with a truck I just bought and it needs repainting in the worst way. Can I just sand this thing down and repaint with the same paint I'm going to use on the truck?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-12-09, 06:47 PM
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paint cap

Yes you can,, I did one three years ago and it still looks good. Just make sure you do a thorough job on the wet sanding or the paint will not stick.
 
  #3  
Old 10-13-09, 12:37 AM
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Thank you. What grit do you sand down to?
I'm going to paint the truck and the cap the same color (black). I also want to try to modify the cap a bit to make it more useful to me. I'd like to take the side windows out, make the window holes longer and put locking doors in their place. I keep just about every tool I own in this truck and I hate climbing over stuff to get the tool I need which is always all the way at the front of the bed.
 
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Old 10-13-09, 03:29 AM
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400 grit is considered the norm prior to using automotive paint. You may need a coarser grit to remove/smooth any problem areas, just be sure to use the 400 afterwards. 400 grit is the coarsest sandpaper that automotive paint can still fill in the sanding scratches.
 
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Old 10-13-09, 04:23 PM
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I don't mind sanding at all. On some of my nicer woodworking projects, I've been known to go down to 1000 grit. A lot of people don't pay enough attention to sanding.
I thought you were going to say 2000 or something. I had assumed I was going to have to go to 1200 or 1500 but I didn't really know for sure as this will be the first vehicle I've ever painted. I just have to figure out how to get dry air. I'm having a serious problem with water in my air when I'm using air tools like a sander or something. I even have a water trap on the compressor but it's not much help.
 
  #6  
Old 10-14-09, 04:14 AM
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What size compressor do you have?
Water traps work better when they are farther from the air compressor. How often do you bleed or drain the compressor?

btw - you can use a finer grit, 400 is just the minimum, any coarser and sanding scratches will show. I suspect if you go too fine it might affect adhesion.
 
  #7  
Old 10-14-09, 12:13 PM
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It's 20 gal 5.5 HP. When I first put it in, I put the compressor about 30 ft away in a separate concrete block room. I couldn't stand having it in the shop with me because when it started I would jump 10 feet. Anyway, from that room I ran PVC hose to a regulator/water trap. Then rubber hose to a wall mounted reel about 6 feet up.
Now the compressor is back in the same room with me but it still goes to the hose reel.
Last night I was using a die ginder with a paint remover pad on it and with in 15 minutes, the die grinder started spitting water. I'm beginning to think the compressor isn't big enough to use a tool like a die grinder and as it struggles to supply me with air, it gets warm and the cool ambient temperature causes a lot of condensation.
Maybe I should insulate the tank?
 
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Old 10-14-09, 02:15 PM
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How often do you drain the trap?

My 1st air compressor was a 1hp 11 gal from sears. I've used DAs and have painted cars with it. I don't remember a lot of moisture problems and I lived in fla at that time. I had a seperate water trap and did drain the tank after each use. The biggest problem I encountered was waiting on the compressor to catch up so I could spray some more. With sanders, they would just continue to operate at a reduced speed.

While I still have the small compressor and use it occasionally [it's portable ] I now have a 6.5 hp 60 gal. The climate here is a lot drier but again I don't have a lot of condensation problems. I bleed off the bottom of the tank regularly and both regulators have a built in water trap.

You might try installing another water trap. It can be as simple as installing a tee with a drop pipe and valve. They say you aren't supposed to use pvc for compressed air. Supposedly it can burst under pressure and cause damage or even injury although I must admit my shop has the air plumbed with 1/2" pvc and it has held up fine for over 17 yrs.

I also have my air compressor set up in a seperate tool room - you can still hear it run but it isn't as overwhelming
 
  #9  
Old 10-17-09, 09:06 AM
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Apparently, I don't drain the tank often enough. I'll start doing it more often. I'll definitely install another trap. I'll try the tee as you suggest.
 
  #10  
Old 10-17-09, 01:59 PM
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You don't have to completely drain the air tank, just enough to drain off the water. While I always completely drained my little 11 gal compressor tank, the 60 gal never gets drained - I just bleed off a little after each day's use, the water settles to the bottom and generally 90% or more of the water will come out in the first few seconds. If I'm going to paint something critical, I'll also bleed it before I start.
 
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