RV winterize,why use air?

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Old 12-29-09, 04:25 AM
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RV winterize,why use air?

Just a little posting for discussion with guys that work on RV's.
Why do technicians advise owners to blow out all lines with air, then run RV antifreeze through all lines after? I'm curious to see what feedback I get on this .
 
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Old 12-29-09, 06:36 AM
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Hello: Mike

In parts of the world where temperatures get down to freezing and below, the water in the plastic supply lines will freeze. Frozen water expands, which will bust/crack/burst the lines and or fittings connecting the lines...

Blowing out the remaining water in the lines helps to prevent the above. Of course, draining the water in the holding tank(s) is also done.

I never heard of using any toxic and hazardous chemical like an anti-freeze in the lines for any reason ever. Flushing will not always remove an anti freeze or any or all of the residual.

Plain water flushing come spring time is all that should be required. Even if the fresh water holding tank water is never used for drinking or cooking, not a good idea to use anti freeze of any type IMO.

UNLESS (????) there is a special type or blend of anti freeze exactly for this purpose of which I am not aware of. ??? I do not live in an area where freezing is a concern.....
 
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Old 12-29-09, 07:18 AM
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A few stores up here in the North(Ohio) sell an RV antifreeze. It's pink in color, and is safe for freshwater holding tanks and lines. Just have to flush til the color is gone, then the water is safe to drink again.
 
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Old 12-29-09, 07:51 AM
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RV antifreeze is sold everywhere up here where everything is frozen for about 5 months. You can even find it in some gas stations and grocery stores. People even use it in their traps and toilets of their seasonal cabins.
 
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Old 12-29-09, 10:15 AM
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Rv lines

Without using air, some water will remain in the lines. I proved this to myself this fall when I was winterizing my RV. I thought draining only was good enough, but my neighbor strongly advised using air as well and he was right. Removing all the water means less wasted rv antifreeze when charging the lines. Antifreeze and water mixed together is a no no because the antifreeze is formulated to be used at 100% strength.
 
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Old 01-02-10, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
Without using air, some water will remain in the lines. I proved this to myself this fall when I was winterizing my RV. I thought draining only was good enough, but my neighbor strongly advised using air as well and he was right. Removing all the water means less wasted rv antifreeze when charging the lines. Antifreeze and water mixed together is a no no because the antifreeze is formulated to be used at 100% strength.
Were you going through city water valve, or through the pump?
 
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Old 01-02-10, 02:34 PM
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O.K.,, I need to ask, where/how was air introduced to the system, and how/where, was antifreeze introduced. I'm assuming this or whatever RV, has a pump in the system.
 
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Old 01-02-10, 03:03 PM
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Rv

Buy an air fitting that attaches to your city water connection. Lower your compressor pressure to 20 psi. Charge the system with air and open each faucet one at a time. Be sure to hold the commode flushing lever down to blow the water out of the line to the commode.

Drain your fresh water tank and your waste tanks.

If you RV has a fresh water tank, then you will have a pump. Use the pump and a short piece of hose to pump the antifreeze out of the jug as you charge the lines with antifreeze. Be sure to bypass the water heater so you do not have to fill the water heater with antifreeze.

Be sure to add about a pint of antifreeze to each drain trap.
 
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Old 01-04-10, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
Buy an air fitting that attaches to your city water connection. Lower your compressor pressure to 20 psi. Charge the system with air and open each faucet one at a time. Be sure to hold the commode flushing lever down to blow the water out of the line to the commode.

Drain your fresh water tank and your waste tanks.

If you RV has a fresh water tank, then you will have a pump. Use the pump and a short piece of hose to pump the antifreeze out of the jug as you charge the lines with antifreeze. Be sure to bypass the water heater so you do not have to fill the water heater with antifreeze.

Be sure to add about a pint of antifreeze to each drain trap.
O.K. Wirepuller38, I have to apologize, I already know all the methods, but I was just curious what the majority of RV techs or those experienced in RV's use. I guess myself and a few others I trained under since day 1, some 15 years ago, are the odd balls. As you and the rest that answered, agree that airing the lines is the way to go, including most of the guys I work with now, because that's the way they were taught, but personally, I have never used air in all those years, and probably thousands of RV's later, which includes $500 vehicles, to $750,000 motorhomes, and have never once,(knock on wood) had one freeze up on me here in Canada, where we need to do it, every winter. I can not count the number of units I've had to bring inside, and thaw, lines from city valve to pump, Manifolds, and miscellaneous other spots, that were all done with air first. I think the main reason being, that the extra operation of airing the lines, is just enough to make them forget where that water may be going when pressure is applied to the lines. I've always questioned the feasibility of doing that. If I'm a dealer, I see it as costing me more money than not airing it. If it's my own, I see it as a waste of time and effort. I may use an extra half or at most one more jug, but that's just mine, and a few others opinions. It really is, an unnecessary step, that in my experience has caused more problems than enough. If you Pump straight from suction side of pump, and through entire system, with same options such as by-pass etc, in proper positions, water heater drained, city valve purged, and after, undo caps of low point drain lines if equipped, let lines drain, throw caps back in, etc, dump some down drains and your done. No looking for, or having to buy blow out plug, air pig, compressor, or whatever, just to use air first. When the antifreeze enters the lines, it's going to take the same amount of antifreeze pumped through line, to get to open tap, whether line is empty or full of water. If full of water, you may be more likely to use an ounce or 2 more per tap, just for your own satisfaction, but I just watch color of liquid coming out of tap. If I'm the owner of the dealership, I'd rather pay for 1/2 jug more per unit, than lose 1/2 hr of labor that I could be billing elsewhere, especially when going door rate in my area, is about $100/hr. But that's just me I guess. What can I say?
Please understand, that I am not saying you or anyone else that is using air, are wrong, as that was not my intention, it was only intended as a thought for discussion, on different methods. I also have to admit I know of some in my area who use air only, and have been lucky doing it that way as well.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 09:12 AM
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Air or Not?

Wow! Thanks for being honest! I have a Cougar 312 RLS. After I drained the lines, I thought I was ready add antifreeze. My neighbor advised that I should also use air. (He has 3 RV's). So I used air at 20 psi and water came out. The draining did not do a thorough job on my unit. I suppose when I added the antifreeze the water would be pushed out. I will know this spring if I did it correctly. Thank you for your input.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
Wow! Thanks for being honest! I have a Cougar 312 RLS. After I drained the lines, I thought I was ready add antifreeze. My neighbor advised that I should also use air. (He has 3 RV's). So I used air at 20 psi and water came out. The draining did not do a thorough job on my unit. I suppose when I added the antifreeze the water would be pushed out. I will know this spring if I did it correctly. Thank you for your input.
As long as you pumped antifreeze from jug, into suction side of pump. Also, don't forget to remove screen in city water hook-up, and push in stem of check valve, to release any water, that is trapped in there as well. If you have low point drain lines under the unit, sticking down, remove the caps on them, let liquid drain out. Once antifreeze has displaced water, there is really no need for it to be in there anymore when you think about it. The reason I do that is because we had a bad batch of antifreeze one year, and everyone that didn't open those low point drain lines, had some freezing. Also, low points, are likely to have water in them, and no where to go, as antifreeze is in behind them, and if air used, it just blew right over top of those low points. Usually they will freeze, but not enough water there to do damage most times.
 
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