99 chev 1500 remote door locks

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Old 11-19-10, 02:49 PM
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99 chev 1500 remote door locks

When the overnight temp drops near freezing, there is not enough lock/unlock force by the solenoids to move the lock plates. In warmer weather or after the cab warms up, problem goes away
 
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Old 11-19-10, 03:36 PM
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(Question) When the overnight temp drops near freezing, there is not enough lock/unlock force by the solenoids to move the lock plates. In warmer weather or after the cab warms up, problem goes away

Easy.

The rubber window seal (pressing against glass) in up position does not displace all water and condensation. Condensation and water can (and will) seep through the seal and find its way down the door and into the door lock actuator. When the temperature drops to freezing or below, the condensation or water will freeze. Once frozen, the door lock actuator will seize. Then once the temperature rises above freezing the lock actuator goes back to operating normally.

The cure is even easier

Remove the inner door panels and give lock actuators a heavy coating of dielectric grease or wheel bearing grease. This will displace the condensation or water from getting into the actuators, thus stopping freezing.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 03:55 AM
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Sam, I had the opposite problem on my '93 K1500. Since the lock mechanism was so long and horizontal rather than vertical, the grease method seemed to slow it down considerably. I found out using either PB dry lube or Dry Lithium grease worked a little better. I found out, too, it was the wide slide part at the door handle that had the biggest friction factor.
 
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Old 11-20-10, 11:55 AM
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(Quote) Sam, I had the opposite problem on my '93 K1500. Since the lock mechanism was so long and horizontal rather than vertical, the grease method seemed to slow it down considerably. I found out using either PB dry lube or Dry Lithium grease worked a little better. I found out, too, it was the wide slide part at the door handle that had the biggest friction factor.

Chandler,

What’s up buddy?


Nothing with the above quote surprises me.

On the other hand the little item below (in red) speaks for itself

I found out, too, it was the wide slide part at the door handle that had the biggest friction factor.

There shouldn't be
a friction factor here buddy
if there is, that tells me that
someone with the skills
(and eyesight) of
“Stevie Wonder”
was in there before
you inner door panels
came off rods and linkages
got bent and distorted
thus creating the
said friction factor


Semper Fi
 
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Old 11-21-10, 04:53 AM
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Bent rod....could have been, but I did find it sluggish in cold weather. Sort of like...Hey, I want to unlock, but I'm really tired. Thanks, friend.
 
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Old 11-21-10, 04:58 PM
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are the door panels difficult to remove? Tom
 
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Old 11-21-10, 07:23 PM
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(Quote) Bent rod....could have been, but I did find it sluggish in cold weather. Sort of like...Hey, I want to unlock, but I'm really tired.

Chandler
What’s up
buddy?


I just want you to understand that the above quote is not a door key cylinder issue. It just presents that way because the key won’t turn in either direction when inserted into the cylinder. Here's what's really going on.

Remember

There are a number of rods and linkages. All the rods and linkages terminate at two spots.

At the electric door lock actuator (aka motor) and the back of the key cylinder in the door.

If any water, condensation, or moisture, freezes at either of the mentioned termination points. The key won’t turn in either direction, because the frozen rods and linkages are preventing rotation.


Spraying WD-40 into the cylinder
Using lock deicer or heating
the key with a cigarette lighter
won’t make a difference


To fix the problem (for each winter season) you have:

Remove all the inner door panels

Use a heat gun to heat up all the lock linkages, rods, and lock mechanisms.

You’re doing this to dry off any water, moisture or condensation that is currently present.

Now when everything is good and dry you want to coat it all with a heavy layer of dielectric grease or wheel bearing grease.

This heavy coating will displace any water, moisture, or condensation, and thus prevent freezing.

To keep the tumblers moving freely inside the cylinder, spray inside the cylinder with WD-40 at least once a week during the winter.


Best Regards
Sam
 
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Old 11-22-10, 03:49 AM
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Tom, the panels will snap off. Use a 5n1 tool to get under the fasteners and gently pry them out. You will need to remove the screw or screws in the grab handle (one you use to close the door. Then lift up and out.

Sam, I see your point. It is not only the horizontal linkage, but the ones interconnected to the manual door lock that can bind up. Gotcha.
 
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