Cargo trailer floor


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Old 07-22-13, 06:11 AM
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Cargo trailer floor

I bought a used cargo trailer- 6' x 10' to tow equipment in. The floor looks like 3/4" plywood but looks to be worn- the metal beams under it look to be in good shape. I am wondering how difficult it is to remove the old plywood and install new plywood. ANy advice-suggestions? Looks like it's all screwed down to the metal beams- i am not sude what type of screws are used
 
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Old 07-22-13, 06:55 AM
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I would assume they used self-tapping metal scews to secure the floor.

One thing to note before removing the floor, Some trailers are assembled from the bottom up, so the walls are actually on top of the floor. Our old camping trailer was like this.
 
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Old 07-24-13, 08:22 AM
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thanks Mike- I will check- at the very least I want to replace the wood on the ramp door in the rear- I took out one old piece of plywood and see that it just screws into metal framing- there are holes already there- One question I have is- if I go to put new plywood down- how do I match up the existing holes? (or do I have to drill new ones?)
 
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Old 07-24-13, 09:46 AM
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While it would be nice to reuse the holes - the odds of being successful doing that are slim to none. Self tapping screws will eliminate the need to drill pilot holes.
 
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Old 07-24-13, 11:42 AM
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just a couple thoughts,could you lay a new floor over the existing one. If you want to use existing holes you could drill pilot holes from the bottom.
 
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Old 07-25-13, 03:54 AM
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They make self drill screws for trailer decking and they work quite well.
Just order in a size for the thickness of the deck.



Click image:

Image courtesy of screwproductsdotcom
 
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Old 07-25-13, 04:39 AM
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just a couple thoughts,could you lay a new floor over the existing one. If you want to use existing holes you could drill pilot holes from the bottom.
The only issue I see with this is weight.
These trailers are already pretty heavy.
 
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Old 07-25-13, 02:29 PM
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Mike is right about heavy when it comes to the ramp door.
You really would not want to double up the material.

You don't describe the trailer except to say it is a 6 x 10 cargo.
Is this an enclosed trailer, what is the gvw rating, what size tires are on it what spacing is the floor support members and what do you intend to haul in it.

If it is a reasonably heavy duty trailer with decent weight rated tires there could be an advantage to doubling up the floor thickness.
One thing to consider is it is fairly common to install screws into the floor of a trailer to secure a load.
 
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Old 07-25-13, 07:22 PM
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If your floor is mechanically sound you might consider coating it with Herculiner or a garage floor epoxy. Looks awesome and wears well.
 
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Old 07-26-13, 05:16 AM
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If your floor is mechanically sound you might consider coating it with Herculiner or a garage floor epoxy. Looks awesome and wears well.
Depending on what has been hauled in the trailer, there is a good chance it's beyond repair.
When people talk about replacing the floor of their trailer, I'm picturing a wood floor that has seen snow mobiles with studded tracks. Those will destroy wood floors to the point of no sanding or finish will save them.

Assuming it's an enclosed trailer, the OP will need to figure out if the walls were installed on top of the floor (top up construction). If the walls are not on top of the floor wood, remove the wood floor, and replace with a new sheet and self-tapping screws. Done deal.
Depending on what they are regularly hauling or can haul that might destroy the floor, a rubber matting might be a good idea. We've used pieces of old conveyer belt to compensate for studs and carbides of the sleds. Again, I'm using snow mobiles as my example as they will do extreme damage, very quickly).
 
 

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