95 Ford Ranger hot start issues


  #1  
Old 05-21-14, 06:52 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
95 Ford Ranger hot start issues

I've joked about my truck being unstealable because of it's many quirks but one thing has become an annoyance since the weather turned warm.
First thing in morning, truck cranks normal. If I cut it off when it is warmed up, it might not immediately crank back. To get it to crank I have to hold the accel pedal to floor like you used to have to do when the vehicle flooded. Sometimes it won't crank even then. Pedal to floor after an hour will usually crank it. In winter, after sitting a couple of hours, it cranks normal. Now that it is 90 degrees, I have to hold the pedal to floor even after it has sit for 8 hours.
I have sprayed Deep Creep in carb and added Deep Creep to fuel but to no avail. What are some possible problems? Seems like the cold start mode sets regardless of actual engine temp.
 
  #2  
Old 05-22-14, 04:26 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 12,016
Received 67 Votes on 56 Posts
Number one thing I would check when it's in a no-start condition is to see if you are getting spark. Heat-related breakdown in electronic ignition components is not uncommon. Can also shoot some carb cleaner (I'm not familiar with the one you mention) into the intake while cranking to see if you can get it to fire. That would tend to point to a fuel delivery issue.
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-14, 04:23 PM
M
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Iowa!!!!!
Posts: 4,213
Received 19 Votes on 18 Posts
That sounds like an ignition control module problem. They aren't too expensive and fairly easy to replace. They come with heat transfer grease. Make sure you put a good coating of it on the module.
 
  #4  
Old 05-27-14, 10:36 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hope everybody had a good Memorial weekend and also took time to remember why we have it.
I have spark. It will crank and immediately flood out and cut off. Then if you try without pressing pedal to floor you get nothing because it is flooded. The spray that I used was called "Sea Foam Deep Creep". The additive just said "Sea Foam" Sorry for the confusion. It may be starting to work. Today I had to run to the jobsite to finish up some odds and ends to get our rough-in inspection. I was there 3 hours. The truck cranked normal after that time with air temp about 80 degrees.
My book shows an ignition control module for the 93 and 94 models and location and how to replace it. It doesn't mention the 95 to 2000 having one. What it does have, looking at the 95 wiring diagram, is 3 sensors that feed data to the Powertrain control module. They are Intake air temp sensor, Eng coolant temp sensor and a Octane Adjust sensor. Does anyone know off the top of their head where these 3 sensors are located and if any of them malfunctioning could cause my symptoms.
 
  #5  
Old 05-27-14, 11:49 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Wondering about leaking fuel injectors? Hot engine heats fuel lines, causes leakage, causing flooding?

Which engine and fuel injection do you have?

Autozone has a pretty good list of component locations in their repair section.
 
  #6  
Old 05-28-14, 09:47 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Engine is 2.3L. I usually put that info in title. Sorry bout that.

Further research shows me there are a total of 5 sensors that supply the PCM with info that determines the amount of fuel that is added to the mix by the solenoid controlled injectors. Too much fuel = flooding = "leaking" injectors. I think we're on the right track.

So my refined question is: Which sensor would set "start" mix but not affect running. Idle and running are fine. Actually, idle seems too fast when i push clutch in upon deceleration. It takes a few moments to settle down, but it does go to normal when I stop.

btw.... located info on location and r/r for all 5 sensors.
 

Last edited by Greyfox; 05-28-14 at 09:51 AM. Reason: additional info
  #7  
Old 05-28-14, 08:31 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So I took my Ranger in for safety inspection today. Armed with my recent research, I was able to talk intelligibly with my mechanic. His experience is that if you must press the pedal to the floor to start then 90% of time the problem is the Engine Coolant Temperature sensor. He said that was an "issue" with that generation of 2.3L Ford engines. I'll be replacing that and report back the results.
 
  #8  
Old 06-05-14, 08:41 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've been holding off on replacing that sensor since I am continuing to see improvement from the fuel additive. after a 30 minute wait the truck cranks normal and the idle is acting normal again. Obviously the additive is cleaning something that is making a difference (injectors?). I only used half the can since it would treat more gallons than my tank would hold so I will add the rest with my next fillup. I've driven about 300 miles since the first dose of additive.

I guess the lesson is to give stuff time to work. Sometimes the results you want are not instantaneous.
 
  #9  
Old 06-05-14, 10:42 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,112
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
It could very well be cleaning gums and deposits off the injectors. Thats pretty much what it does. And yes, you need to run a tank or so through before you really start to see anything.

Wish we could have seen a before and after of them.
 
  #10  
Old 06-05-14, 12:53 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,645
Received 16 Votes on 13 Posts
OP, run full can of Seafoam through tankful. Don't worry about "overdoing". Also, you want to get on FWY and run engine hot right after, for maybe hour, so that Seafoam really "gets there". Deep Creep is not fuel additive. It's Seafoam equivalent of Liquid Wrench. Not even sure how you landed using it in the fuel. Or I am misreading something?
You, also, want to do 2 tanks, can of Seafoam per each, consecutively.
Also, do not forget to use a funnel to pour it in and FLUSH it in with gas, so that it does not stay in filler tube elbow or somewhere else.
Seafoam is good medicine. I'd drive with it in crankcase too, then change oil. I had it in mt Ranger oil for 2500 miles out of curiosity once.
 
  #11  
Old 06-06-14, 08:40 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'll add the rest of this can and get another per your instructions. There still could be another issue. As yet, it still doesn't want to start normal immediately after shutting off. However, in 10 minutes it cranks normal.

The improvement in performance is so dramatic, it makes me want to put a can in each of our other vehicles.

I used Deep Creep to successfully unclog the tiny aperture under the diaphragm of my PAS unit and to free up the choke flapper on my Mom's riding mower. It didn't work on the truck trying to spray it in where the air intake attaches. If I removed the intake hose to spray it, the idle became very unstable. I also realized that I was dealing with a fuel injection system, not an old fashioned carburetor.
 
  #12  
Old 06-19-14, 07:47 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Final update

I've driven out another tank of Seafoam treated gas and running and cranking are perfect. In all my 62 years I have never seen a fuel additive make such drastic improvements to cranking and performance. I am now a believer.

I'm back in love with my Ranger ;-) She ain't pretty.... she's a construction work truck and also been the recipient of falling limbs during several ice storms and thunderstorms but she has almost 350,000 miles on original motor and trans and doesn't use a drop of oil between changes.
 
  #13  
Old 06-29-14, 06:59 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 759
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My thinking is injector leak by was original problem and is now cleaned up. If it happens in future, a fuel pressure gauge attached at right time,(after heated up or better yet just prior to ) and shut off and watch gauge for pressure drop, indicating leak by at injector, thus causing flooded symptoms. When cool, any fuel that hasn't evaporated will only help start, but when engine warm, will cause flooding.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: