Buzzing Noise While Braking

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  #1  
Old 01-06-15, 08:42 AM
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Buzzing Noise While Braking

We had a couple inches of snowfall this morning and my Tundra is behaving oddly when braking. If I brake and the truck begins to slide even the slightest bit, the pedal pushes back towards my foot, which is accompanied by a loud buzzing noise. The more pressure I apply to the brake, the harder it presses back--pretty forcefully. So much so that it's as if it doesn't want me to be pressing the brake pedal at all. It has done this for as long as I have owned the truck and I have nearly gotten into a couple accidents because of it. Is something wrong with my ABS system? Can I disable the ABS system to avoid this from happening again? It is extremely frustrating not to mention dangerous.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-06-15, 08:55 AM
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What year is your Tundra?

If you've nearly gotten into accidents you think because of it I would get it looked at by a pro immediately. Is the ABS idiot light on the dash on continuously? Does the ABS light come on when you get the "buzzing"?
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-15, 09:03 AM
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It's a 2004 and there are no lights illuminating. I was exaggerating a bit about the accidents, but there have been times when it has been snowing and I waited to apply the brakes longer than I probably should have and began sliding towards vehicles at stop lights and found that I couldn't stop the vehicle as quickly as I wanted because the pedal would kick back at me. Would a faulty power booster cause this sort of thing to happen? Now that I think of it, it has always seemed more difficult than normal to stop my truck even in dry conditions. I figured it was because of the weight, but my wife's SUV weighs more and can stop on a dime. I know one test is to apply the brake while starting the engine to be sure the pedal depresses a little--mine does not budge and remains high and hard. BTW, I believe the buzzing is caused by the ABS valves. Regardless, the forceful pedal push-back and resistance does not seem normal.
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-15, 11:02 AM
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Pickup truck braking and handling $uks. Period! Most of the weight is on the front axle with little over the rear one. Traction is greatly affected by weight. Little weight = little traction. The rear wheels on a truck are easier to lock up so you'll get the ABS kicking in a lot more often than on a car or SUV. When cornering you also have to be careful as the back end loves to break free. Most vehicles will push in a turn but a pickup with an empty bed is loose and the back end just loves to slid out in a turn.

One thing that helps is to keep better tires on the rear. It seems counter intuitive as everyone says you want the good tires on the front for steering. With good tires on the front the front will stick in the turn while the back end kicks out putting you into a spin. Better tires on the rear especially with some well secured ballast will balance out the traction better. Then when you get into a turn a bit too fast the back end won't break free so suddenly. You may turn and the front wheels will loose traction so the truck won't respond as well to the turn but if the front slides it does not cause a spin.

Cheapest and easiest is to add weight to the back of your truck. Even a few hundred pounds can greatly help the wet and winter handling. It's not great for you mileage though.
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-15, 12:26 PM
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I have a water bladder that holds up to 400 lbs that is made specifically for pickup trucks. Today was our first snow and I haven't put it in yet. With that sucker filled up, it's like driving a tank.
 
  #6  
Old 01-06-15, 02:15 PM
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the forceful pedal push-back and resistance does not seem normal.
It is normal for the brake pedal to pulsate when the ABS is working although I don't recall ever hearing the buzzing. Personally I don't care much for ABS but it's great for people like my wife that just mash the brake and don't realize you need to let off and reapply the brake when the tires lock up.
 
  #7  
Old 01-06-15, 02:29 PM
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Mine makes a sound and vibration in the brake pedal that can be easily be heard and felt even over the clanking and rattling of a Cummins diesel. As long as ABS is working I love it. It's a great safety feature. The downside is it can be expensive to fix if needed.
 
  #8  
Old 01-07-15, 12:10 PM
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Mine buzzes, the pedal kicks back forcefully, and the front wheels lock up. I hate it.
 
  #9  
Old 01-12-15, 08:14 PM
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What you have explained sounds like normal ABS operation to me. Unless the ABS light is on or you can confirm that the front tires are locking up (which is the exact opposite of what ABS is supposed to do) I would say it sounds normal. Some trucks/cars will respond differently as far as pedal pressure and noise but my TrailBlazer acts the same way.
Remember your pickup truck is heavy but light in rear so it won't take much to get it to slide. What kind of tires are you running? Stock? Tires play a BIG role.
 
  #10  
Old 01-13-15, 08:35 AM
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The buzzing is the ABS valves pulsing the brakes several times per second to prevent any wheel from locking up. The harder you push, the more pressure is being ported, the louder it gets. In the early days of ABS systems being available (and often as an option) there were many complaints that it was less effective than manual brake control--but ALL the tests showed stopping distances were reduced when controlled by the ABS rather than by your leg muscles.
 
  #11  
Old 01-13-15, 04:06 PM
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Unless the ABS light is on or you can confirm that the front tires are locking up (which is the exact opposite of what ABS is supposed to do) I would say it sounds normal.
I'll pay closer attention next time and report back (once it snows again). When I apply the brakes and it begins to slide, the ABS kicks in like it is supposed to, but it doesn't seem to stop the vehicle from sliding. What stops it from sliding is me letting off the pedal.

From the NHTSA.gov website:

On very soft surfaces, such as gravel or unpacked snow, ABS may actually lengthen stopping distances.
Interesting.
 
  #12  
Old 01-14-15, 07:11 AM
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On very soft surfaces, such as gravel or unpacked snow, ABS may actually lengthen stopping distances.
I can see how that could be true. ABS prevents a skid and the only instance I can imagine where you might stop faster in a skid is on deep soft surface where a skid could plunge the vehicle in deeper.
 
  #13  
Old 01-14-15, 08:39 AM
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Sounds like normal abs to me. Those systems let you know when something is wrong. Unless youre getting abs lights, I would not worry about it
 
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