Which water pipe/tubing is best for an rv?

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  #1  
Old 02-18-15, 04:23 PM
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Which water pipe/tubing is best for an rv?

I'm used to using pvc and cpvc around my house but is there a consensus that one type is best for rv's?
 
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Old 02-18-15, 04:39 PM
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Well, in FL you probably don't need to worry about freezing too much, but CPVC would be my choice.

Have you considered PEX?
 
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Old 02-18-15, 05:37 PM
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I would use PEX. It's flexible so it's easy to run whichever way you want. The big drawback is the need for a special crimping tool but you might be able to borrow or rent it.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 06:00 PM
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I've never used pex but I believe it's flexible plastic tubing and expensive? Needs special tool? Maybe that's why I haven't used it. But if it can take some freezing, expand and not split and I can snake it through complex angles it could be worth it. Aren't there different kinds of pex? Well, I can google pex but I'll look at it if you guys think it's the best choice. I like cpvc but it's not so flexible.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 06:11 PM
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It's not really expensive when you consider that you don't need a bunch of fittings and glue and such. The Pro's will tell you more later, but you can often buy the tool used or on E-bay for much less than retail, then re-sell it.

There are different types of PEX, both for the clamps and the type of tubing. You'd just need the basic stuff, not that designed for boilers and such. And yes, that's why PEX has become so popular, it won't crack and split like hard plastic pipe. I bet if you check out new RV's, that's what they use.

I believe most folks here like the crimp fittings as opposed to the cinch clamps. It requires a go/no-go gauge but that's not a big deal once you get used to it.

That is one issue...do you have the space to get the tool on?

I haven't used it, but I've heard/read plenty about it.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 06:16 PM
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I haven't started a project yet. Planning ahead. I'm still working on the house right now.

So is the crimp tool the only expensive, specialized tool needed for pex? Or I could use compression fittings. How about using other hose clamps like automotive types?

And having the space to get the crimping tool in could be an issue I guess.

What tubing or fitting did I see on "This Old House" that stretched the tubing, then you put the fitting on/in and the tubing permanently contracted onto the fitting? And can you use Sharkbite fittings with pex?

Ok, I found a utube showing six different connections to use with pex. If that's everyone's choice then that's what I'll study up on. Yeah, I like that. How many pipe materials do we get a choice of six different ways to join pieces?
 

Last edited by time1; 02-18-15 at 07:01 PM.
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Old 02-19-15, 03:35 AM
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There is only one way to connect PEX for the DIY'er. Crimp fittings. Some use cinch fittings, but I like the crimp ones, as Vic said, you can use a GO-no-GO gauge to ensure proper fitment. The crimp tool may be down to about $40 now. The one you saw on TOH used a tool that cost probably $500. Yes, you can use Sharkbite fittings on PEX, depending on when you run out of money. Average fitting is about $8. Don't try to go outside the parameters of the requirements of PEX. No compression fittings on line runs. Use the tool and the fittings.
 
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Old 02-19-15, 07:34 AM
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RV Plumbing

Whichever type of tubing you decide to use will need to be able to withstand the vibration when traveling on the road.
 
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Old 02-19-15, 07:40 AM
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PEX piping is what is normally used on RV vehicles.
 
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Old 02-22-15, 07:08 AM
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Thank you gentlemen. I've always used pvc and cpvc but it looks like I'm going to switch mostly to pex in the future for the flex. If I need rigid pipe for a certain application I can go back to harder plastic. And except for the cost Sharkbite fittings are hard to beat for ease of use. With these new materials plumbing is sure easier than it used to be. Although the hard part, pulling out the old stuff, is still there.
 
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Old 03-09-15, 12:04 PM
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Use Pex, and if you don't want to invest in crimp tool, or room is limited to use it, we have been using "Flair-it" and "Seatech" fitting successfully for years. Flare-its are cheaper than Seatech and require a little more effort to install but would be better for motorhome use.
 
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