Camper

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  #1  
Old 04-07-15, 01:36 PM
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Camper

looking for a 25-28 ft pull behind camper 1/2ton towable. Any pros are cons?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-07-15, 02:25 PM
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Are you looking at 5th wheel, goosneck, or bumper pull? I like gooseneck, personally for ease of taking sharp turns or backing into tight places. I don't own a camper, but pros would be availability of the towing vehicle to go to the store to get a loaf of bread, rather than pulling a second vehicle behind a motorized home.
 
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Old 04-07-15, 02:43 PM
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A friend of mine headed west a few years ago and hasn't returned, guess they found a place that was warmer than Maine. He chose a 5th wheel unit, but one of the problems he ran into, if I remember right, were the different laws in different states. He ended up buying a dual rear wheel dodge to get a vehicle that would meet all laws in all the states he would be traveling through. He is a retired police lieutenant so knew the regulations. And his 5th wheel wasn't extremely big.

Bud
 
  #4  
Old 04-07-15, 03:53 PM
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Your question is really open? Pros and cons of what?

My folks recently got rid of their little 5th wheel. They pulled it with a 3/4 ton but it was very doable behind a 1/2 ton.

One of the big benefits of a 5th wheel is the increased living space without increasing the length of your towing rig since part of the living area is up and over the bed of your towing vehicle. The downside is you cannot have a cap over your truck bed so you lose some storage space.

Another drawback with a 5th wheel is you have to remember to lower the tailgate before hitching and unhitching. I got two "you won't believe what I just did" phone calls over that.

If you're considering a trailer the pro is that you take your hotel room with you. Many will argue that there is no packing and unpacking but if you've ever used a camper you know there's a whole lot more packing & unpacking than with a hotel room when you consider parking, unhitching, leveling jacks, extending an awning... the list goes on for a good bit. But if you want to travel many areas of the west, Canada and Alaska a RV is sometimes your only option unless you want to travel far out of your way or alter your travel plans around hotel and lodge locations.
 
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Old 04-07-15, 04:39 PM
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It depends on what your tow vehicle is..

Dont let the dealers sucker you in to anything. Most dealers will tell you.." yes you can tow it" .. Most times you may be severely overloaded..

Here is the criteria..

What truck do you have? Engine, rear gears, and body style? ( All trucks are different)
What does the GAWR on the door stickers say for front and rear axles?
What do the tires say on the sidewall, max psi and lbs per tire???


What we want to find is your actual payload. After you get that info take your truck fully loaded with passengers, full tank fuel and gear you may use for camping to the nearest cat scale.. It will cost less then 10 bucks. Get your individual axle weights then post back..


CAT Scale Locator | CAT Scale

If its a 5th wheel you are looking for then you may be limited on whats out there. #'s dont lie. You may be supprised to see what your actual payload is...

If you dont have enough truck then a travel trailer with WD hitch may be best.. You can get more trailer with a WD over a 5th wheel most times when truck does not have the capacity...

5 vers tow better then TT though so its a toss up...


Hope this helps..
 
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Old 04-07-15, 04:45 PM
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Just take your GAWR of the rear on your door tag and subtract it from the RAWR you get from the cat scale. That will tell you what pin weight to be looking at for 5th wheels... That # is your max payload...

I was a tractor trailer driver for some years in my youth. DOT goes by axle weights.. Tires carry the load and are normally rated at or above what the axle is rated at.. Not that non commercial is regulated by the DOT I just try to stay with in limits..

And if you ever towed above vehicle axle weights you will be white knuckleing in .. Its not fun...
 
  #7  
Old 04-08-15, 02:17 AM
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We've owned several travel trailers and one motorhome over the years. Were we to buy a new trailer, it would be another Jayco. Hands down, the best built of the bunch unless you prefer (and can afford) an Airstream.

If you don't mind paying less and having a bit less room, consider trailers with no slideouts. They also weigh a lot less. As a compromise, some have "short slides" that extend only a couple of feet. Two of our trailers had one, and you'd be amazed at the difference they make. As a side benefit, you can access the entire trailer when the slide is in. Deeper ones tend to block the aisle.

If you can, try to visit an RV show before you buy. You'll be able to see virtually everything that's available, all in one place.
 
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Old 05-01-15, 01:17 PM
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Thanks guys! I have been away a few days. Yes I'm looking for a standard pumper pull (for lack of words) Reese Hitch!!! Yea I figured it would come to me. 1/2 ton tow-able im in a Tundra, I believe rated at 10,300. I run 65lbs in my tires.
 
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Old 05-02-15, 05:28 AM
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Camper

Sounds like you want a travel trailer.

Slides give added living space, but add to the weight of the trailer.

The travel trailer will have a decal listing both the loaded and unloaded weight of the unit. Keep the loaded weight below your 10,300 lb. towing capacity.

Here is a web address to get you started. Happy shopping:

http://www.jayco.com/products/travel...te-hawk/24rks/
 
  #10  
Old 05-02-15, 05:43 AM
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If I remember correctly, the towing capacity includes the vehicle. A quick search gave me this:
"With trailer towing capacity, you must consider the gross combination weight rating. This figure includes the gross vehicle weight plus the gross vehicle weight of the trailer. "
That quote was on the Google search but is probably at the link they referenced.
Towing Capacity: The Maximum Weight That You Can Pull Safely | GMC

Bud
 
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