Fuel Filter Corroded - Cut and Repair help needed!

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  #1  
Old 07-18-15, 04:30 PM
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Fuel Filter Corroded - Cut and Repair help needed!

2000 Chevy 1500/Silverado.

Fuel filter connections are corroded, will not open. Im going to give it another shot tomorrow after they soak.

However... my question is about cutting off the connections... what type of material do I need to make the repair? I don't want to have to buy and learn how to use a flaring tool.
 

Last edited by zmike; 07-18-15 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 07-19-15, 05:02 AM
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Flaring tools are pretty simple to use so there is not much learning. Many auto parts stores have tools you can borrow so you might not even have to buy the tool. Even if you have to buy it flaring tools are relatively inexpensive. Just make sure you get the correct flare angle. There is no one standard flare angle but 37 and 45 degrees are the most common.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 09:20 AM
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Does your filter use threaded fittings or a girdle spring to hold the fittings to the filter ?
If you cut the GM fittings off you can use rubber hose to connect the fuel line to the filter.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 09:47 AM
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thx both for your replies.

filter is standard one with threaded fittings.

PJ that is the method I was thinking about... a little retrofit plumbing job.... cutting off the flare nuts and adding a short piece of rubber.

But I am not sure what size/type of line and fittings I need nor do I know the size of the gas line itself.
 
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Old 07-19-15, 09:53 AM
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The two most common sizes are 5/16" and 3/8".
 
  #6  
Old 07-20-15, 06:52 AM
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I'm not sure that's a good idea. The reason for the solid line with threaded fittings is to hold up to the pressure. Older cars used rubber fuel lines because they were a simple gravity feed to the mechanical pump. Parts of the system will still have rubber hoses, but they will be steel reinforced with threaded fittings and not hose-clamped in place.

Side question, are you using flare nut wrenches? If not, that will help tremendously.
 
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