Replacing alternator seems easy. But a few questions anyway.

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Old 12-11-17, 11:51 AM
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Replacing alternator seems easy. But a few questions anyway.

Same old 92' Ford Ranger XLT with 2.9 V6. My alternator failed, so I'm waiting on a replacement. I already removed the old one. One of the wire connectors linked below isn't in very good shape. You can see a little bare wire and the plastic lock tabs broke off. Also the white plastic coating melted and softened a little. The voltage regulator wire connector is fine.

I have a few questions.

I don't know how to wire, pigtail, or solder. So I'd like to just reuse this wire connector. I can put a little silicone on the bare wire and tape over. And I notice that even without the locking tabs, the wire connector plugs in tightly. I suppose I could always have a new wire connector installed later if needed, without removing the new alternator. Think it's ok to reuse?

Also, I definitely don't want to buy a re-manufactured alternator. Never had good luck with those. I found a brand new one made by Ultima. Are these any good?

I can't determine if my make/model takes 60 or 75 amp alternator. Parts store guy says brand new one only comes in 75 amp and that will work on my make model. Do you agree?

http://i434.photobucket.com/albums/q...211_105612.jpg
 
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  #2  
Old 12-11-17, 12:15 PM
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most replacement alternators will come with a new pigtail just have to cut the old one off strip off a small amount of insulation crimp on the new one with crimping pliers and shrink the heat shrink over it not a big deal to install common failure item that melted witch is why most manufacturers include a new one with the alternator.
 
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Old 12-11-17, 12:30 PM
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Are you saying new alternator comes with new wire connector? If so, that would explain why my alternator from years ago installed with a new wire connector. Can I use a wire nut or wire connector instead? I don't have any experience with crimping.
 
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Old 12-11-17, 12:56 PM
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I would just buy a set of pliers if you don't have any you want the non insulated crimpers some pliers have different styles on them like below your local parts store should have them or even Walmart usually has them also you just insert the stripped wire into the crimp terminal and while holding the wire in use the pliers to smash an indent into the terminal securing the wire then the heat shrink is slid over and shrunk with a lighter, heat gun or blow dryer would likely work also to insulate the bare crimp terminal and yes every alternator I have installed on fords that used this connector came with a new pigtail in the box didn't matter if it was remanufactured or new.
https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-84-19...+wire+crimpers

https://www.amazon.com/Channellock-9...=wire+crimpers
 
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Old 12-11-17, 01:16 PM
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What about going from a 60 amp to a 75 amp alternator? I don't know what I have now. I hear sometimes you have to use a heavier gauge wire if you install higher amp alternator.
 
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Old 12-11-17, 01:47 PM
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should be fine they used that same connector on every truck and many cars also for a lot of years alternator amps vary a lot based on electrical load and battery charge but 75 amps is still a stock option and should be handled by the factory harness and wire size.
 
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Old 12-11-17, 02:26 PM
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Ok. Thanks. I'm picking up the 75 amp Ultima brand tomorrow morning. That's all they have for brand new. Hope it's good quality. I'm reading about the crimping tool now. On the tool, how to you what gauge setting to use for stripping off insulation if you don't know the gauge wire you're working with? And what kind of connector do I want to use for this application?
 

Last edited by bluesbreaker; 12-11-17 at 02:47 PM.
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Old 12-12-17, 03:50 PM
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I have everything I need now: new alternator with voltage regulator. crimping pliers, connectors, shrink tubing, and pigtail wire connector. I included photo below. The pigtail has those little silver metal barrels already crimped on the wire ends.

What do I do with those? Are those meant for soldering? I don't want to get into soldering. Those silver barrels are not color coded for crimping either. Do I cut off those barrels and insulation, and then work with bare wire to crimp myself?
 
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Old 12-12-17, 06:33 PM
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There should be another connector for the "barrels" to be inserted into, opposite end of the pigtail you have pictured. No butt connectors or crimping should be needed.
 
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Old 12-12-17, 06:56 PM
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Really..........................? That never crossed my mind. Just to be clear, it's not like the barrel connectors you see in consumer electronics wiring. So I hope my terminology isn't off. How do make sure it holds in place with just insertion? The opposite end wiring in the engine compartment is taped up. I'll see what's under there and report back tomorrow.

Also, all the new alternators use serpentine belt pulleys. My old truck is V-Belt. So the parts store guy removed the V belt pulley from the bad alternator with an impact wrench, and then torqued it onto the new alternator. I assume that's standard practice. But wanted to make sure.
 
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Old 12-13-17, 02:19 AM
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there non insulated crimp terminals already installed on the pigtail side they will not be color coded did you read my previous post about getting non insulated crimp pliers well you should see a spot that's not color coded as they offer a better crimp connection than insulated terminals usually do.
there is other ways of doing this I suppose you could always cut the wires and solder or even go buy insulated crimp connectors but the alternator manufacturers has typically given you everything you need besides the pliers witch most technicians would already have anyway, to make this as simple as possible.
 
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Old 12-13-17, 08:59 AM
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The opposite ends of the old pigtail wires have been soldered with the same silver non-insulated terminals. I'd rather leave that in place and just strip the wires ahead of that area.................and then just crimp/connect/tape that with the terminals on the new pigtail. Will that work?

Yes. I read your previous post. I purchased the crimping pliers. I see the red, yellow, blue, and non-insulated indicators. But they don't seem to be aligned to the notches on the tool. So I don't know how to read the tool.
 
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Old 12-30-17, 02:25 PM
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Forgot to update you guys. I figured out the rest of it myself. I used the method where you twist the wire ends together, then solder, then apply heat shrink tubing, then wrap electrical tape. It took me some time to practice soldering.

All done. Voltmeter indications are normal. Thanks again.

But next time I do this, I want to combine solder with non insulated butt connectors. I'll have to order bare metal butt connectors online. Very poor selection at brick and mortar hardware stores. What diameter or AWG rating of butt connector should I get for automotive wiring on my make/model?
 
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Old 12-31-17, 03:03 AM
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It depends on the size of the wire, butt connectors [and other types] are sized for different wires. The insulated ones are color coded so you can tell which one you need at a glance. Using the right size connector for the wire insures that it will go on easy and not slip off after being crimped. Soldering them would probably make a connector being oversized a non issue.
 
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Old 12-31-17, 04:01 AM
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I would have thought you would find a small assortment on one of those carousels of miscellaneous items that most independent auto parts stores use. Anyway, 14-18 gauge would cover most applications. But, for what it's worth, I have a pretty good assortment of connectors and almost never use this type. If you have space to solder, I think that you're going to have a better quality connection by doing it in the conventional manner of twisting the wires together and capping it with shrink tube. If there no way to get it soldered, then I use insulated crimp joints.
 
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Old 12-31-17, 12:34 PM
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Finding the insulated color coded connectors is easy. The non-insulated tubular shaped ones are virtually non-existent in the hardware or auto parts stores here. I ran into a slight problem while completing this first time solder. I tried to twist one of the copper wires. The wire was hard and brittle from old age, and strands started breaking off. I didn't have any bare metal butt connectors on hand. So I left the brittle wire straight and twisted the other one onto it. Then I added a little extra solder. The drawback with the insulated connectors is that you can't add solder to them as far as I can tell.

I'll order the recommended gauge non-insulated connectors on electricalhub.com or similar. Then I can have these as a backup, if for some reason I can't use the twist and solder method. Thanks.
 
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Old 12-31-17, 03:59 PM
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If you feel better soldering everything you can always remove the insulation on the connector, insert wires, lightly crimp, then solder.
 
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Old 01-01-18, 09:06 AM
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The insulation on the color coded connectors is pretty hard. Do I use the cutting edge from my crimping pliers and small torch flame to remove it?
 
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Old 01-01-18, 01:56 PM
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Often you can just pull them off, if not I'd slice them with a utility knife.
 
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Old 01-01-18, 03:45 PM
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Ok. Then it would make more sense to keep a small assortment of the insulated ones, if they can be readily converted to non-insulated.
 
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Old 01-19-18, 01:35 PM
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By the way, I went to a specialty hardware place in town recently. I finally found non-insulated butt connectors. They sell single pieces which was cheap. I picked up a few different sizes for my toolbox.
 
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